About to Bypass Neutral Safety Switch

No neutral safety isn't a problem till its a problem 🤭 😬😃

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I tried to start it in neutral and in park but it only starts as soon as I move it towards reverse. Also, my backup lights are not working.

Of course they aren’t working, you didn’t wire up your harness correctly. I told you exactly how to do it but you appear to only want advice from the bransford. You can’t go by colors in your case. Do it as I outlined earlier.
 
Of course they aren’t working, you didn’t wire up your harness correctly. I told you exactly how to do it but you appear to only want advice from the bransford. You can’t go by colors in your case. Do it as I outlined earlier.

Oh sorry I didn’t see your post! I will look back at it. Thank you
 
Oh sorry I didn’t see your post! I will look back at it. Thank you

Don’t mess with the shifter at this point. Fix the wiring first. It will probably fix both the lights and starting issues because right now the wiring is screwed up for both. You have your ignition power for the backup lights hooked up to a ground circuit. You are probably going to need to replace the backup lights fuse as you likely shorted that circuit by now.

Also as I stated earlier, you need to determine which side of that black wire goes to ground and which side goes to the starter relay. The side that goes to the starter relay needs to go to the center position on the NSS connector. The ground side can be taped off.

As I also outlined earlier, the jumper harness for manuals loops the starter relay into a pin that corresponds to ground. That’s why it’s looped and you need to cut it. If you had the auto jumper harness, the black wire would come out of the big plug and go straight to the middle pin on the NSS. You are essentially hacking the wiring to create that yourself, which means you need to find the starter relay side of the black wire and run that to the middle position of the NSS.
 
Don’t mess with the shifter at this point. Fix the wiring first. It will probably fix both the lights and starting issues because right now the wiring is screwed up for both. You have your ignition power for the backup lights hooked up to a ground circuit. You are probably going to need to replace the backup lights fuse as you likely shorted that circuit by now.

Also as I stated earlier, you need to determine which side of that black wire goes to ground and which side goes to the starter relay. The side that goes to the starter relay needs to go to the center position on the NSS connector. The ground side can be taped off.

As I also outlined earlier, the jumper harness for manuals loops the starter relay into a pin that corresponds to ground. That’s why it’s looped and you need to cut it. If you had the auto jumper harness, the black wire would come out of the big plug and go straight to the middle pin on the NSS. You are essentially hacking the wiring to create that yourself, which means you need to find the starter relay side of the black wire and run that to the middle position of the NSS.

This pic is what I copied exactly to my harness. Sorry I have a hard time understanding schematics. So maybe the picture is wrong?

IMG_0160.jpeg
 
This pic is what I copied exactly to my harness. Sorry I have a hard time understanding schematics. So maybe the picture is wrong?

View attachment 461430

That’s definitely not correct, at least for your case. You can’t just match up colors, you have to learn how the things work and apply that to the changes that need to be made.

Not sure where this pic came from but violet/white is what brings power to the NSS for the backup lights. With that taped off the power is stopping at that connector, so the power can’t make it to the backup lights. As I outlined before, ignition power goes to one of the outer wires on the NSS. The other outer wire takes the power back to the backup lights. The NSS connects those two wires when the transmission is in reverse.

Read my first post after you asked for help. I listed exactly how it needs to be done and why. The hardest part will be figure out which side of the black wire needs to go to the NSS. You can either try that on a 50/50 chance of trial and error, or you can grab a multimeter and check to see which side of the wire has continuity to ground and which side has continuity to the relay.
 
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That’s definitely not correct, at least for your case. You can’t just match up colors, you have to learn how the things work and apply that to the changes that need to be made.

Not sure where this pic came from but violet/white is what brings power to the NSS for the backup lights. With that taped off the power is stopping at that connector, so the power can’t make it to the backup lights. As I outlined before, ignition power goes to one of the outer wires on the NSS. The other outer wire takes the power back to the backup lights. The NSS connects those two wires when the transmission is in reverse.

Read my first post after you asked for help. I listed exactly how it needs to be done and why. The hardest part will be figure out which side of the black wire needs to go to the NSS. You can either try that on a 50/50 chance of trial and error, or you can grab a multimeter and check to see which side of the wire has continuity to ground and which side has continuity to the relay.

Thank you so much. I will try in the morning!
 
That’s definitely not correct, at least for your case. You can’t just match up colors, you have to learn how the things work and apply that to the changes that need to be made.

Not sure where this pic came from but violet/white is what brings power to the NSS for the backup lights. With that taped off the power is stopping at that connector, so the power can’t make it to the backup lights. As I outlined before, ignition power goes to one of the outer wires on the NSS. The other outer wire takes the power back to the backup lights. The NSS connects those two wires when the transmission is in reverse.

Read my first post after you asked for help. I listed exactly how it needs to be done and why. The hardest part will be figure out which side of the black wire needs to go to the NSS. You can either try that on a 50/50 chance of trial and error, or you can grab a multimeter and check to see which side of the wire has continuity to ground and which side has continuity to the relay.

Got it to work! Thanks so much for taking the time to help.
 
I would do like Blaine said with a momentary switch. It would also act as a theft deterrent.
Bumping this old thread because I've been giving some thought to how I want to do this. I'm considering a custom button panel (from the likes of custom3dfab). I read @mrblaine 's comment and thought, "Yep, a momentary switch for clutch bypass makes total sense." But then I thought about the ways I'd be using it. For example: when swamped, holding down a switch while also cranking the key and, presumably, steering the Jeep, sounds like it could require more hands than I've got. So I'm back to thinking an on/off switch and the wherewithal to click it off when it's not needed is the way to go.

If you wanted to get real tricky, two momentary switches side-by-side on the dash could work: one starter (I guess with the ignition cylinder starter wire either connected or disconnected) and one clutch bypass. That way, you could operate the starter & clutch bypass with one hand. Letting go of either one would shut off the starter. Hmm.
 
Bumping this old thread because I've been giving some thought to how I want to do this. I'm considering a custom button panel (from the likes of custom3dfab). I read @mrblaine 's comment and thought, "Yep, a momentary switch for clutch bypass makes total sense." But then I thought about the ways I'd be using it. For example: when swamped, holding down a switch while also cranking the key and, presumably, steering the Jeep, sounds like it could require more hands than I've got. So I'm back to thinking an on/off switch and the wherewithal to click it off when it's not needed is the way to go.

If you wanted to get real tricky, two momentary switches side-by-side on the dash could work: one starter (I guess with the ignition cylinder starter wire either connected or disconnected) and one clutch bypass. That way, you could operate the starter & clutch bypass with one hand. Letting go of either one would shut off the starter. Hmm.

I haven't re-read all 5 pages of this old thread, but if the problem with a clutch bypass switch is that you don't have enough hands, have you considered the OEM-equipped foot-activated clutch "bypass" switch?
 
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I haven't re-read all 5 pages of this old thread, but if the problem with a clutch bypass switch is that you don't have enough hands, have you considered the OEM-equipped foot-activated clutch "bypass" switch?
:LOL:

Well... yeah. But hidden in these five pages are a good reason or two why you might not want to do that.
 
So I'm back to thinking an on/off switch and the wherewithal to click it off when it's not needed is the way to go.
Maybe have the momentary switch energize a timed relay that would shut if off? I'm also trying to think how you could use the ignition wire to open the relay back up whenever the Jeep shuts off rather than using an expensive timed relay.
 
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Maybe have the momentary switch energize a timed relay that would shut if off? I'm also trying to think how you could use the ignition wire to open the relay back up whenever the Jeep shuts off rather than using an expensive timed relay.
Yeah, I do like that solution. The bypass would latch as long as the starter is running. So if the starter stops cranking, you have to hit the button again if you want to crank again.

I thought about that, but it seems like an overly-complicated way to save myself from my own attentiveness. As it's been pointed out here & elsewhere, people managed without clutch safety switches for decades.
 
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I have seen several disasters caused by disabling the NSS. One was a CJ at a car show that rode up on the hood of a pristine, unrestored 57 Vette.

No, it wasn't caused by a lack of a Nanny State device. It was caused by an IDIOT that 1) Didn't bother to either push in the clutch OR put the thing in neutral, and 2) Couldn't simply hit the brakes and clutch once the "accident" did occur. Its also very hard for the vehicle to start in gear if the damn PARKING BRAKE was engaged when it was parked - but I forget: Americans don't use their parking brakes.

I had a "run away" one time due to a faulty throttle linkage. It was annoying, but absolutely no problem whatsoever as I had brakes (both service and parking), gearshift, and ignition key ALL available as remedial devices (automatic, so no clutch). I actually used the ignition key - turning it off and back on briefly until I could get it to a safe location to stop for good. This stuff isn't rocket science, but it might as well be what with IDIOTS who are both untrained and lack any common or mechanical sense whatsoever. Bah!
 
No, it wasn't caused by a lack of a Nanny State device. It was caused by an IDIOT that 1) Didn't bother to either push in the clutch OR put the thing in neutral, and 2) Couldn't simply hit the brakes and clutch once the "accident" did occur. Its also very hard for the vehicle to start in gear if the damn PARKING BRAKE was engaged when it was parked - but I forget: Americans don't use their parking brakes.

I had a "run away" one time due to a faulty throttle linkage. It was annoying, but absolutely no problem whatsoever as I had brakes (both service and parking), gearshift, and ignition key ALL available as remedial devices (automatic, so no clutch). I actually used the ignition key - turning it off and back on briefly until I could get it to a safe location to stop for good. This stuff isn't rocket science, but it might as well be what with IDIOTS who are both untrained and lack any common or mechanical sense whatsoever. Bah!