Affordable forged alloy wheels for 35s - an experiment

I for one am ready for an update!

Wheels came in today 🙂

I'll call this experiment a success.


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Are you going to share who made them?

I don't have an answer to your question because I do not know. Just so you know, it is not also really relevant to why I started this thread. My goal was to document my experiences with this experiment (and it really was one) and share the results and learnings.

There are two ways you can go about something like this, and this applies to things other than wheels too. For those that have experience working with suppliers overseas, what I'm about to say won't be any surprise whatsoever. You can find a wheel that you like on any of the Chinese websites, and then try to contact the company directly. They may or may not have the wheels in the size that you want. Or their scale maybe too large and they may not want to do just 5 wheels. You keep looking till you find something that will work for you. Or you can go through an intermediary who speaks reasonable English, and will work with you to understand your design needs, timeframe and budget. Then they will work with multiple factories to figure out who can make the wheels within your constraints. I chose the latter route.

In either case, the full money is paid up front. That is a certain level of trust involved. Or you can call it risk.

I encourage you to explore options and find out a path that is at an acceptable risk level for you. I have shared everything that I'm willing to share publicly at this point of time.
 
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I don't have an answer to your question because I do not know. Just so you know, it is not also really relevant to why I started this thread. My goal was to document my experiences with this experiment (and it really was one) and share the results and learnings.

There are two ways you can go about something like this, and this applies to things other than wheels too. For those that have experience working with suppliers overseas, what I'm about to say won't be any surprise whatsoever. You can find a wheel that you like on any of the Chinese websites, and then try to contact the company directly. They may or may not have the wheels in the size that you want. Or their scale maybe too large and they may not want to do just 5 wheels. You keep looking till you find something that will work for you. Or you can go through an intermediary who speaks reasonable English, and will work with you to understand your design needs, timeframe and budget. Then they will work with multiple factories to figure out who can make the wheels within your constraints. I chose the latter route.

In either case, the full money is paid up front. That is a certain level of trust involved. Or you can call it risk.

I encourage you to explore options and find out a path that is at an acceptable risk level for you. I have shared everything that I'm willing to share publicly at this point of time.

What happened to @Chris ’s wheels? I saw he had some made too. Who made his?
 
From personal experience, those Allen Head bead lock bolts are a pain. They strip easily, so take care with them.

I’m surprised they’re even used, they must have a very low torque spec.

The only beadlocks I’ve worked with thus far are the Hutchinsons, and those demand 100 ft lbs.
 
The only beadlocks I’ve worked with thus far are the Hutchinsons
You should have just stopped there.
I’m surprised they’re even used, they must have a very low torque spec.
The job a group of fasteners has to do can be easily divided into multiple points of attachment. In the case of yours, they don't use very many so they step up the diameter. Assuming 8 bolts torqued to 100 ft. lbs, that generates about 112,000 lbs. of clamp load to hold the two rim halves together with the caveat if one comes loose, you have lost 14,000 lbs of clamp force.

The 24 bolt version above uses 5/16" diameter fasteners that when torqued create 4700 lbs of clamp load each. Multiply that by 24 and you wind up with, yep, you guessed it, 112,000 lbs of clamp load with the caveat that if you lose one, that's only 4700 lbs.

Little known and very confusing fact, socket head cap screws with the little numbers stamped around the rim are graded higher than grade 8. ;)
 
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You should have just stopped there.

The job a group of fasteners has to do can be easily divided into multiple points of attachment. In the case of yours, they don't use very many so they step up the diameter. Assuming 8 bolts torqued to 100 ft. lbs, that generates about 112,000 lbs. of clamp load to hold the two rim halves together with the caveat if one comes loose, you have lost 14,000 lbs of clamp force.

The 24 bolt version above uses 5/16" diameter fasteners that when torqued create 4700 lbs of clamp load each. Multiply that by 24 and you wind up with, yep, you guessed it, 112,000 lbs of clamp load with the cavet that if you lose one, that's only 4700 lbs.
That makes a whole lot of sense. 👍

Little known and very confusing fact, socket head cap screws with the little numbers stamped around the rim are graded higher than grade 8. ;)
I had to check for myself because that’s crazy.

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How exactly does that work?
 
That makes a whole lot of sense. 👍


I had to check for myself because that’s crazy.

View attachment 476451How exactly does that work?

Works the same as every other fastener. The only difference is the vast majority of socket head cap screws meet the high spec because they are socket head cap screws. You don't even have to go to the specialness that is Unbrako either.
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What confuses folks is when you move away from the alloy steel versions and get into the various stainless grades which are very commonly not even as strong as grade 5.
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To be equivalent to grade 8 or better, they would be A4-100 in stainless. A4 denotes the particular SS alloy and the 100 is the N/M of tensile divided by 10. There are other ways to mark them and the -100 is a very rare fastener. -80 is more common but still rare.
 
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