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Air conditioning blowing hot air

schabj3

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2021
Messages
71
Location
Fort Mill, SC
Anyone guide me to a starting point to figure out what’s wrong with the AC? I have a 2006 TJ X with about 62,000 miles. Hot air blowing when on the AC setting.

Thanks.
 

AndyG

TJ Guru
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Messages
12,754
Location
Alabama
Anyone guide me to a starting point to figure out what’s wrong with the AC? I have a 2006 TJ X with about 62,000 miles. Hot air blowing when on the AC setting.

Thanks.
I’m not deeply familiar with the system, but it will be that the switch is not telling the right mechanism to operate essentially....or that part is not responding to the switch.

This is typically called a blend door issue as it allows the air from the heater core vs ac to mix to control cabin temperature .


Cause? Basically lack of use- 62,000 miles in 15 years is just over 4000 a year...things get sticky, stuck, frozen, dry out, etc. Plus moisture and dust collect on surfaces that don’t need them.

First, work the switch a lot, and fiddle with the solenoids that move the doors under the dash, silicone spray may help, and watch for disconnected wires , chewed wires and the like.

A good rule of thumb for all of us is to operate the system frequently in all modes.

If you use the search engine you will see this issue, and see that it has been solved.

TJ’s are fairly solid little vehicles, a lot of issues with them are from sitting, age and owner neglect, rather than poor quality or design. In some cases you will wish the owner had neglected them, because they messed up more than they fixed.

Hope this helps
Andy
 

qslim

The Man with the Big Yellow Car
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2018
Messages
4,757
Location
Utah
First step is to determine if the compressor is turning. With the engine running & AC turned in all you have to do is look at it. The inner part of the pulley should be rotating with the belt which means that the compressor clutch is engaged & the compressor is spinning. If that is the case then you have an issue with the blend door system not routing cool air to the vents.

If that isn’t the case then compressor clutch isn’t being engaged and the most likely culprit is low refrigerant pressure. If you have a leak somewhere the pressure sensor will keep the clutch from engaging to prevent damage.

Refrigerant is greasy, so a visible leak of enough volume is easy to spot because it will attract dirt and grime. Look over all the AC lines for signs of a leak, & take flashlight and look at the condenser for a patch of greasy dirt. Refrigerant also has a very distinctive smell which I can only describe as refrigerant if that helps lol.

Tackling AC yourself requires a set of manifold gauges & a vacuum pump to do it right, folks on here will help you out. Otherwise the best way to approach it (assuming there isn’t an obvious leak) is to take it to a shop, have it evacuated & recharged with refrigerant along with addition of some UV dye. That way if & when does leak it’s easy to spot.
 
OP
S

schabj3

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2021
Messages
71
Location
Fort Mill, SC
First step is to determine if the compressor is turning. With the engine running & AC turned in all you have to do is look at it. The inner part of the pulley should be rotating with the belt which means that the compressor clutch is engaged & the compressor is spinning. If that is the case then you have an issue with the blend door system not routing cool air to the vents.

If that isn’t the case then compressor clutch isn’t being engaged and the most likely culprit is low refrigerant pressure. If you have a leak somewhere the pressure sensor will keep the clutch from engaging to prevent damage.

Refrigerant is greasy, so a visible leak of enough volume is easy to spot because it will attract dirt and grime. Look over all the AC lines for signs of a leak, & take flashlight and look at the condenser for a patch of greasy dirt. Refrigerant also has a very distinctive smell which I can only describe as refrigerant if that helps lol.

Tackling AC yourself requires a set of manifold gauges & a vacuum pump to do it right, folks on here will help you out. Otherwise the best way to approach it (assuming there isn’t an obvious leak) is to take it to a shop, have it evacuated & recharged with refrigerant along with addition of some UV dye. That way if & when does leak it’s easy to spot.
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