All things welding

Interesting - they removed a selection for gas type?

you also select the process being used which covers the gas.

My 235

Miller-Multimatic-235-Welder-MIG-Screen_700x700.jpg
 
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Oh, yeah. I just remembered that mine also has a material selector (aluminum, steel, stainless, etc.) That's probably why they had a gas choice, too.
 
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The auto set is more of a suggestion or starting point. There's other factors to consider such as overall volume of metal in the parts being welded, ambient temperature & humidity, capabilities of the welder or machine, etc. For example, Mr. Blaine runs really hot, but if another person tried to weld with the same settings then they might have trouble managing the puddle. Some auto set feature will give you a small range of adjustment but that is not always enough. Don't be afraid to push the limits of the machine settings (on scrap pieces first) & you might find you're more capable of a welder than you thought you were.

Welding machines with an auto set feature are seldom used on an industrial scale. Instead each weld has what's called a WPS (weld procedure specification) that gives the welder a set of parameters & allows them to adjust how they see fit as long as the settings are within those parameters.
 
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I'm curious to hear how the modern Auto-set works. On my old 250MP, I set the wire size, gas type, and material thickness, and it sets the wire feed speed and voltage for me.
That is how the Miller multimatic 220 I bought 2 years ago works.
 
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If you are like me, you have 2 problems following best practices and advice. 1, you don't weld often enough to stay in practice. 2, you will never be good at uphill Mig and even if you practice enough to get good, you will lose it in short order if you don't keep practicing.

What I do instead, is get really good at downhill.

This is all downhill, they will never fail, and I need something I can do every time that will give acceptable performance that doesnt' look terrible that I can get right back into the swing of doing in fairly short order.
View attachment 504490

View attachment 504491

If you aren't doing it enough to stay good at pushing uphill, it goes without saying that I'm not. But those downhill welds look great to me.
 
Welding machines with an auto set feature are seldom used on an industrial scale.

I think that's why the 250MP didn't last long. Back in 1992, I don't think there were as many guys welding in their garage because we didn't have YouTube or even Internet forums to learn from each other. The Auto-set feature is great for those of use who don't weld every day!
 
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Since somebody brought up the auto-set function, I'd like to explore that a little. I've researched where career welders say that auto-set doesn't run hot enough. Is that statement relatively true across all platforms? I run a Millermatic 211 auto-set and it seems to do a pretty damn good job for the most part in my amateur opinion.

Those welds above are .030 wire just a smidge into the 3/16" thickness range. They would be way too hot if I turned it over to the top of the 3/16" thickness range.
 
That's purdy! I'll have to take a pic of my controller tonight to show what state-of-the-industry looked like three decades ago...

Here's what 1992 Auto-set looks like:

IMG_6042.jpg


And I need to try some .030" wire. I've always used .035", but do occasionally struggle with it.
 
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I ordered .030 for delivery tomorrow. Figured I’d try it too.

I had bad luck twice ordering wire (granted they were 30lb spools) online. Both times, it wasn’t packed well enough and the spool cracked, which resulted in a birds nest situation. Now I just buy it locally. I hope you have better luck!
 
I had bad luck twice ordering wire (granted they were 30lb spools) online. Both times, it wasn’t packed well enough and the spool cracked, which resulted in a birds nest situation. Now I just buy it locally. I hope you have better luck!

I’ve had the same experience with bad packaging and a cracked spool when I ordered a little 2# spool of 0.030” ER309L stainless wire that I got for exhaust work. I tried to get it at the local Airgas but they didn’t have it and couldn’t tell me when they could get any.
 
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I’ve had the same experience with bad packaging and a cracked spool when I ordered a little 2# spool of 0.030” ER309L stainless wire that I got for exhaust work. I tried to get it at the local Airgas but they didn’t have it and couldn’t tell me when they could get any.
Were you able to use that wire on the stainless exhaust tube with any success? I have a spool, what I don't have is tri-mix gas and I'm not willing to spring for that expensive nightmare unless I have a reasonably high level of success. My teacher tells me the big issue is welding with SS electrode is a very low energy process so it is hard to keep the weld clean and smooth without a lot of spatter and I can do that just fine with normal Mig wire.
 
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Were you able to use that wire on the stainless exhaust tube with any success? I have a spool, what I don't have is tri-mix gas and I'm not willing to spring for that expensive nightmare unless I have a reasonably high level of success. My teacher tells me the big issue is welding with SS electrode is a very low energy process so it is hard to keep the weld clean and smooth without a lot of spatter and I can do that just fine with normal Mig wire.

Yes, if you call success sticking 2 pieces of metal together. I put a down pipe on my '08 6.7 Cummins from an '06 5.9. Both are 4" but the turbo outlet is bigger on the 6.7. So I had to cut the flange off the stock downpipe and weld it to the new one. I don't have any pics of the raw weld. It was hard to do. You have to move way faster than I'm used to. Here it is after I sprayed it with high heat paint which I did in case my technique was too hot and messed up the corrosion resistance, which I guess is a thing. I did get a small bottle of Tri-mix to use.
downpipe 1.jpg


downpipe insitu 2.jpg
The only other thing I had to weld for that project was to bend some stainless rod for hangers and tack them on. Also surprisingly difficult and not pretty:
exhaust 2.jpg
 
Yes, if you call success sticking 2 pieces of metal together. I put a down pipe on my '08 6.7 Cummins from an '06 5.9. Both are 4" but the turbo outlet is bigger on the 6.7. So I had to cut the flange off the stock downpipe and weld it to the new one. I don't have any pics of the raw weld. It was hard to do. You have to move way faster than I'm used to. Here it is after I sprayed it with high heat paint which I did in case my technique was too hot and messed up the corrosion resistance, which I guess is a thing. I did get a small bottle of Tri-mix to use.
View attachment 504685

View attachment 504683The only other thing I had to weld for that project was to bend some stainless rod for hangers and tack them on. Also surprisingly difficult and not pretty:
View attachment 504684

I'm more than able to fuck it up without using special wire and gas so it looks like I'll keep doing just that.
 
Were you able to use that wire on the stainless exhaust tube with any success? I have a spool, what I don't have is tri-mix gas and I'm not willing to spring for that expensive nightmare unless I have a reasonably high level of success. My teacher tells me the big issue is welding with SS electrode is a very low energy process so it is hard to keep the weld clean and smooth without a lot of spatter and I can do that just fine with normal Mig wire.

I have a 2 lb roll of stainless wire that I've used twice over the years. Like you, I also didn't want to buy another bottle, so I thought, what can it hurt to try on a simple project where failure is no big deal? I have a large Yeti cooler that I use to age small white-tail deer quarters in, so I built a drop-in cage out of small diameter stainless rod which was welded with normal 75/25 gas and stainless rod. It welded just fine, but corrosion was a possibility. I haven't used that cage in years, so I'll have to take a look at it. The last time I looked, the welds were not corroded. It's got to be going on a decade old now.

The second time I used it was recently. I changed the oil pan gasket on the LJ, so I had to remove the exhaust. The previous owner had work done on it, and it was welded almost completely, so I cut it to get it out. I then added v-band clamps and new stainless pipe in a couple areas. Since it was temporary due to the mid-arm kit sitting on the shelf waiting on me, and since my TIG skills aren't up to the task, I took my 100% Ar bottle from the TIG machine and put it on the MIG, and welded the v-band rings with the stainless MIG wire. The MIG sounds funny welding stainless, but it seemed to work okay (for now). When I get the mid-arm in, I'll either practice TIG more or outsource the welding. I do have a purge setup (just a dual flow meter regulator and rubber plugs), so I can weld with the pipe empty of oxygen. However, I'll need a LOT of practice to get that done...
 
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I have a 2 lb roll of stainless wire that I've used twice over the years. Like you, I also didn't want to buy another bottle, so I thought, what can it hurt to try on a simple project where failure is no big deal? I have a large Yeti cooler that I use to age small white-tail deer quarters in, so I built a drop-in cage out of small diameter stainless rod which was welded with normal 75/25 gas and stainless rod. It welded just fine, but corrosion was a possibility. I haven't used that cage in years, so I'll have to take a look at it. The last time I looked, the welds were not corroded. It's got to be going on a decade old now.

The second time I used it was recently. I changed the oil pan gasket on the LJ, so I had to remove the exhaust. The previous owner had work done on it, and it was welded almost completely, so I cut it to get it out. I then added v-band clamps and new stainless pipe in a couple areas. Since it was temporary due to the mid-arm kit sitting on the shelf waiting on me, and since my TIG skills aren't up to the task, I took my 100% Ar bottle from the TIG machine and put it on the MIG, and welded the v-band rings with the stainless MIG wire. The MIG sounds funny welding stainless, but it seemed to work okay (for now). When I get the mid-arm in, I'll either practice TIG more or outsource the welding. I do have a purge setup (just a dual flow meter regulator and rubber plugs), so I can weld with the pipe empty of oxygen. However, I'll need a LOT of practice to get that done...

Good luck. I'll never be good enough to spend the time to Tig up any stainless exhaust. I only use stainless because it is cheap and easy which makes welding it all up with the wire feed also cheap and easy. Just looks like ass.
 
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