TJ Fest 2021
Join us in Moab, Utah from 4/24/2021 to 5/1/2021 for the first annual TJ Fest 2021. Click here for more information.

Automatic tire deflators


TJBrad04

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
73
Location
US
Lots to choose from out there.... Which ones does everyone prefer?

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
 

Mr. Bills

TJ Expert
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
3,007
Location
Area Code 530
If you are going with automatic deflators my suggestion would be Coyote deflators, a step up from Staun although Harry (aka the Silver Coyote) will sell you Stauns if that's what you really want.


Also available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JJND26I/?tag=wranglerorg-20

There are similar automatic deflators on Amazon and Ebay that look the same and cost less. Doesn't matter - you should buy from Harry. He has contributed a great deal to the offroading community and has been a mentor for many jeepers. He doesn't sell junk.

___________
Disclosure: I do not own Coyote deflators. I have a set of similar looking S*ittybilt automatic deflators that I won in a raffle that are junk.
 

mrblaine

TJ Guru
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Messages
10,693
Location
Quail Valley, CA
If you are going with automatic deflators my suggestion would be Coyote deflators, a step up from Staun although Harry (aka the Silver Coyote) will sell you Stauns if that's what you really want.


Also available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JJND26I/?tag=wranglerorg-20

There are similar automatic deflators on Amazon and Ebay that look the same and cost less. Doesn't matter - you should buy from Harry. He has contributed a great deal to the offroading community and has been a mentor for many jeepers. He doesn't sell junk.

___________
Disclosure: I do not own Coyote deflators. I have a set of similar looking S*ittybilt automatic deflators that I won in a raffle that are junk.
He actually understands how they should and should not work well enough that he was able to patent his latest technology in deflators. He is the king of understanding air pressure.
 
OP
T

TJBrad04

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
73
Location
US
Thanks everyone, I'll order some Coyotes tomorrow!

It's been a loooong time since I've been out on the trail(10+ years) Currently running 35" km2's on black 8" steelies. I plan on getting some beadlocks and 37s when these wear out, but in the meantime..... What is a good psi to start out at? It's sad but I forgot lol

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
 

Jerry Bransford

TJ Guru Moderator
Staff Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Messages
15,316
Location
Escondido California
He actually understands how they should and should not work well enough that he was able to patent his latest technology in deflators. He is the king of understanding air pressure.
I've been a lover of my Currie deflator for years but you guys convinced me to order a set of the Coyotes. I had nothing but bad experiences with auto deflators being inconsistent before so I'm hoping these work as you're saying they do.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Apparition

toximus

TJ Expert
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2018
Messages
5,096
Location
Northern WI
What is a good psi to start out at?
Depends on the trail. 7 or 8 psi is a sweet spot but can also make the bead slip which will make your tire out of balance. Having a narrow rim like you have will help combat the bead slipping though. My last trip I went to 11psi because I was heading home on a Sunday hours away from any place that could balance for me. Make sure you have a way to fill back up before the drive home!
 
OP
T

TJBrad04

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
73
Location
US
I've been a lover of my Currie deflator for years but you guys convinced me to order a set of the Coyotes. I had nothing but bad experiences with auto deflators being inconsistent before so I'm hoping these work as you're saying they do.
I've got the ARB deflator already, just looking for something a bit "easier"

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
 

Mr. Bills

TJ Expert
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
3,007
Location
Area Code 530
Thanks everyone, I'll order some Coyotes tomorrow!

It's been a loooong time since I've been out on the trail(10+ years) Currently running 35" km2's on black 8" steelies. I plan on getting some beadlocks and 37s when these wear out, but in the meantime..... What is a good psi to start out at? It's sad but I forgot lol

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
Optimal destination pressure (see, I actually read the Coyote website) depends upon where and how you offroad. If most of what you do I forest service roads and relatively mild trails or if you are an overlander then 15 psi might be a good place to start, or perhaps 12 psi for the moderate trails. For the tough stuff 10 psi down to 8.

They are easy to re-set. Since you are just getting back into offroading you might start with a higher destination pressure and adjust downward manually from there each time out as your needs dictate. After you have a better idea of your particular typical trail pressure you can adjust the destination pressure of the deflators.
 

mrblaine

TJ Guru
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Messages
10,693
Location
Quail Valley, CA
I've been a lover of my Currie deflator for years but you guys convinced me to order a set of the Coyotes. I had nothing but bad experiences with auto deflators being inconsistent before so I'm hoping these work as you're saying they do.
Maybe I should tell them the story of the very first time I met you at a run down in Los Coyotes and you fetched up your helper to unload the box which contained that monstrous quadflator?
 

Jerry Bransford

TJ Guru Moderator
Staff Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Messages
15,316
Location
Escondido California
Maybe I should tell them the story of the very first time I met you at a run down in Los Coyotes and you fetched up your helper to unload the box which contained that monstrous quadflator?
Ha yes I went through several iterations of types of deflators with the goal of making it faster and easier to air down. The "quadraflator" was great in theory and I actually got the idea from some magazine article. One of its enticements was it could also reinflate all four tires at once. I went out and bought the hose and fittings and made one. Its greatest flaw was it still wasn't very fast and it somehow didn't get all the tires evenly deflated or inflated which is why I stopped using it. It was fun to make though, all part of the learning process. :)

2002_0721_202238AA.JPG
2002_0721_202150AA.JPG
 
Last edited:
  • Haha
Reactions: Kenneth G Zinis

Drizit

TJ Addict
Joined
Feb 18, 2018
Messages
1,248
Location
Canada
@Jerry Bransford , any update on the Coyote tire deflators?
I picked up a set towards the end of last summer as I was sick of fighting with my old 1st gen staun beadlocks not letting the arb deflators run any faster then pushing the pin with a key. Seeing as I do a lot of trail guiding and nubie runs my time was much better spent helping others. These are great, I go down to 4psi and they hit within 1/2 psi every time. I've previously used the smittybilt and other Chinese ones, they usually stop within 5psi or so, they were of no use to me. I can't say enough good things about them, I think I'll get a second set for when I'm doing easy stuff and only want to drop to 8psi.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JMT

Mumblewood

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Messages
532
Location
Renton Wa
I’ve never been a fan the the auto deflaters, mainly since I will very my air pressure on the terrain I run IE dunes are different from trails are different from snow. Also when trail jeepin I’ll usually go a couple pounds lower than I want if my tires are cold(trailer vs driving to trail head) or large elevation change. That’s why I like the currie deflater, fast and simple.
 

Mr. Bills

TJ Expert
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
3,007
Location
Area Code 530
Subsequent to my first post in this thread I purchased Coyote deflators to replace the crappy Smittybilt deflators I won in a raffle. (Two sets of Coyote deflators, actually.) I highly recommend them.

I don't worry about ambient temperature. I use my Coyote deflators to set pressure regardless of outside conditions and during a break later in the day I may take one deflator and walk around the vehicle adjusting pressure of hot tires on a hot day if necessary. Only takes seconds.

This is how Harry Llewellyn, owner of Coyote Enterprises, advises handling the effect of changes in temperature on tire pressure:

PRESSURE ADJUSTMENTS FOR TEMPERATURE INCREASE
As tires warm up, the pressure increases. To pick up that increase from a cold morning air down to a midafternoon, summer lunch break, just screw the deflators back on the tire valve stems and pull the Manual Start Rings. Then, wait for them to shut OFF. Expect only a few seconds of air flow since the pressure increase is typically only a couple of PSI.
As for different air pressure requirements for differing terrain, I have two sets of Coyote deflators at two pressure settings. This works out for me because I own two offroad vehicles. The "overlanding" pressure works for both rigs. The second set is calibrated at lower pressure for sand and tougher trails in the jeep but is not particularly useful for my overlanding rig. Still, I carry both sets of deflators in my air tool bag and move the bag from vehicle to vehicle as needed (I am the only driver so no need for two kits).
 
Last edited: