Bigger oil filter

Brian Alcorn

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 29, 2019
Messages
374
Location
27025
Saw a post a while back about a bigger oil filter .. can someone point it out please .. don't come up when searching oil filter
 
I have ran a Ford FL1 - all it does is spill more when changed.
One of my cars had its oil filter located at the top of the engine, it was even sitting in a cup-shaped aluminum bowl that had a drain tube to let any spilled oil flow down into the pan. Its oil filter was easily changed and it created zero mess. It was pure genius, I wish I could remember which car that was.
 
  • Like
Reactions: John Cooper
One of my cars had its oil filter located at the top of the engine, it was even sitting in a cup-shaped aluminum bowl that had a drain tube to let any spilled oil flow down into the pan. Its oil filter was easily changed and it created zero mess. It was pure genius, I wish I could remember which car that was.

Probably the Audi, or the Lamborghini, I don't the Mclearons have that feature :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 
One of my cars had its oil filter located at the top of the engine, it was even sitting in a cup-shaped aluminum bowl that had a drain tube to let any spilled oil flow down into the pan. Its oil filter was easily changed and it created zero mess. It was pure genius, I wish I could remember which car that was.

Do you remember oil changes on the TR6 with the reusable canister, totally impossible without covering everything in oil.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cliffish
Keep in mind that bigger oil filters don't filter any better, they can just be used longer before getting so clogged they go into bypass mode.

The only advantage to a larger oil filter is increased oil capacity. Oil both lubricates and cools, a larger oil capacity, in theory should help prevent overheating, if that is an issue. For most of us, a larger filter only increases maintenance cost. If you want better filtration, you need to look at the oil filters micron spec.
 
  • Angry
Reactions: 5632
What a lot of people are not considering here is that the primary function of the bypass is to keep the engine from starving for oil during cold starts and high speed operation, the bypass opens all the time in normal operation.

The small oil filters have a low bypass rating meaning they open sooner and more often than the larger filters with higher bypass ratings. (Due to the smaller media area they have to have a lower bypass rating to prevent oil starvation). There is also the matter of the location and the quality of the bypass valve. I found that Motorcraft uses a quality bypass valve located at the top (threaded end) of the filter while others put the bypass at the bottom which allows for a cheaper design using a plastic or thin rubber bypass valve. The larger FL-1A that fits our 4.0 engines also has a higher bypass rating, meaning it opens less and for shorter durations than a smaller filter with a lower rating, allowing less unfiltered oil to pass overall. IMHO it is a good choice for our somewhat primitive 4.0 engines.



bypass.jpg
 
The only advantage to a larger oil filter is increased oil capacity. Oil both lubricates and cools, a larger oil capacity, in theory should help prevent overheating, if that is an issue.
Surely you don't believe the extra quarter-cup of oil in a bigger oil filter is going to make a significant difference in engine temperature.
 
Surely you don't believe the extra quarter-cup of oil in a bigger oil filter is going to make a significant difference in engine temperature.



I guess you missed where I stated, "in theory'.

I could put a 2qt filter on a GM 350. That extra 1.5qt was a significant increase.
 
One of my cars had its oil filter located at the top of the engine, it was even sitting in a cup-shaped aluminum bowl that had a drain tube to let any spilled oil flow down into the pan. Its oil filter was easily changed and it created zero mess. It was pure genius, I wish I could remember which car that was.

The old MBZ has a top mounted cartridge filter. Zero mess. MBZ did this one right - but they were making up for their previous design which was a bottom mount cartridge filter that was damn near IMPOSSIBLE to get put back onto the engine without it going on wrong and leaking. My father and I both cussed our older MBZs because of that damn filter! I remember my dad being ALL pissed off multiple times, for some odd reason Adolf Hitler was mentioned frequently. It was so bad that I started having my mechanic change the damn thing for me - and even he managed to have it leak one time. But I did find out what the trick was: With the car on the lift, you took a BFSD - and I mean a BIG FSD - about 3 feet long - placed it under the engine "just so" and rocked the engine over about a quarter of an inch on its mounts. Then the damn thing would go right in, no problem.

So when I got this 300SD, its revised filter setup was a cause for celebration! All other things being equal, I do prefer a cartridge filter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jerry Bransford

Sigh, I just went and checked my last Motorcraft on the shelf, they did indeed move the bypass to the bottom. It's a never ending battle trying to stay with quality stuff but I'll stay with the larger size anyway in the belief that the bypass operation will be less.
The bypass location on our horizontally mounted filters is not as important as a vehicle where it is mounted with the bypass on the bottom where it can pick up more debris.
I have to assume the change was driven by money.
 
One of my cars had its oil filter located at the top of the engine, it was even sitting in a cup-shaped aluminum bowl that had a drain tube to let any spilled oil flow down into the pan. Its oil filter was easily changed and it created zero mess. It was pure genius, I wish I could remember which car that was.

Subaru?
 
  • Like
Reactions: cliffish