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Camping tent suggestions?

jazngab

TJ apprentice
Supporting Member
Aug 23, 2018
703
Montgomery County, PA, USA
Never used a tent in recent memory but going camping in June and looking to buying one. Just a regular tent, not a fancy TJ overland type tent. I’d like one preferably 6-8 ppl for my family of 4, and just as important, one that it fairly quick and simple to pitch as I would probably be doing it solo with minimal help. I’m not familiar with tent pricing but I don’t want to spend a boat load if I can help it. It’ll be a first tent and I’d like to see if I like camping enough to do it often. Any suggestions?
 

Bababooey

TJ Enthusiast
Oct 4, 2016
189
They have a lot of “self erecting” [insert juvenile comment here] tents now that are super easy to use. Google search will show you lots of examples. A decent pad to insulate you from the ground makes a big difference in terms of staying warm.
 
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Drafthorse

Member
Oct 21, 2018
26
Eastern Shore
will there be wind (OBX?)- make sure you talk to someone about that. you don't want the tent not to be able to handle stronger wind. (not farts)
Go to REI or Gander to get info, but you may want to look at some of the big box places for what you end up getting.
Or use FB mktplace or CL for someone getting out of "glamping"
 
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creecer

New Member
Feb 26, 2019
6
Woodstock, GA
You are going to want a ground cover (footprint), and look for one that has a an included rain fly as well. For the ground cover, a tarp should work just fine if your tent doesn't include it. Ideally you want a rain fly that includes a vestibule so that everyone can take their shoes off "outside" and not get dirt in the sleeping area, but those are harder to find in a tent of that size. Consider the season you'll be camping in, and choose one accordingly. Good ventilation is important in the summer time. Depending on how how tall/big your family is, you may want something with a more vertical wall structure. It will feel more like sleeping in a cabin versus the typical domed tent. Anything free standing should be easy to put up with one person. I'm a big fan of Kelty tents.
 

luk4mud

TJ Enthusiast
Sep 23, 2018
139
Pasadena, CA
The Coleman instant tents are well made and really do deploy quickly. I would start the search there, given your criteria. Keep in mind that the manufacturers' version of a 6 person tent realistically holds 4 people comfortably.
 

creecer

New Member
Feb 26, 2019
6
Woodstock, GA
The Coleman instant tents are well made and really do deploy quickly. I would start the search there, given your criteria. Keep in mind that the manufacturers' version of a 6 person tent realistically holds 4 people comfortably.
Yup, the Coleman tents are a good quality product, just a bit on the heavy side. Coleman used to make some pretty slick "multi room" tents, but I haven't looked at their current offerings. They come in handy if you want to be separated from other but still share a tent. To be honest, you'll probably go through a few before you find the one that is perfect for you. I've got a few Kelty's now, and use them for different situations. When I'm not with the family, I prefer a hammock.
 
OP
jazngab

jazngab

TJ apprentice
Supporting Member
Aug 23, 2018
703
Montgomery County, PA, USA

luk4mud

TJ Enthusiast
Sep 23, 2018
139
Pasadena, CA
I see this one that appears to be a good deal but it’s not an “instant” tent.
Thoughts?

Doubt it will sleep 8 (maybe 6 if you are ok with someone's foot in your mouth, probably fiberglass poles. I'd look for one with metal poles and a quicker set up.
 
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Ericict

I don't proofread for your enjoyment.
Supporting Member
Mar 6, 2019
228
Wichita, Ks
Cabela Alaskan guide tents are worth their weight. I had the 12x12 and gave it to my oldest daughter for their family. You could put a stove in it if needed. We used it to minus 10 and the stove kept it at 65 in the tent. Mines is close to 20yo and still works great.
 
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Sancho

TJ Enthusiast
Jan 17, 2018
588
San Diego, CA, United States
Just go to yoyr local walmart and grab a coleman family tent.. or possibly 2 mid size tents.

Should be around 100 bucks.

Tents are pretty eastly to setup, you dont jeed an easy pop up tent, unless you plan on paying more.

Personally, i use a big angus 2 person backpacking tent. But i grew up using the coleman tents.
 

Steel City 06

TJ Enthusiast
Mar 12, 2019
901
Pittsburgh, PA
Man, that sounds dangerous! Are you talking about a stove that burns gas or propane? Sounds like a recipe for CO poisoning.
Mr. Heater makes a set of catalytic propane heaters called the Big Buddy (18,000 BTU), Portable Buddy (9,000 BTU) and Little Buddy (4,500 BTU).

The catalytic (flameless) heaters do not produce any significant carbon monoxide and are safe for use in structures, tents, truck caps, etc. They do have an oxygen (not carbon monoxide) detector that shuts it off of oxygen levels get too low.

I use them all the time in tents and truck caps. Because I’m paranoid I always bring a carbon monoxide detector as well. Never set it off with the heaters. Set it off a couple times in the truck cap because I was idling the engine though.

Never use an unvented flame type heater in an enclosed space.
 

ac_

zombicon
Supporting Member
Jun 15, 2017
4,237
AZ, United States
@jazngab I actually like that tent. I have graduated to the overland type tent, but before that I used a Coleman dome tent. I actually had it for years. Never used it with kids, but it held up fine with us adults. The tents like you suggested are pretty easy to set up, and they are good in windy conditions. I used to use cabin tents with actual tent poles and found more than not they would break in big winds. Yours will change its shape, but spring back.

One time I was at Eastern WA, and we were out water skiing and when we got back to the cabin tent, the actual walls and roof ripped right off and blew away. The floor was still staked down. I have never and anything happen in a dome tent like that. I have had winds push the roof down to my face, but it always sprung back.

Now I glamp. Although I do have an overland tent trailer.

Have fun and post pics of your tent and your trip!
 
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zebra12

2005 Unlimited Rubicon auto
Supporting Member
Apr 9, 2018
741
Corvallis, OR, USA
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OP
jazngab

jazngab

TJ apprentice
Supporting Member
Aug 23, 2018
703
Montgomery County, PA, USA
@jazngab I actually like that tent. I have graduated to the overland type tent, but before that I used a Coleman dome tent. I actually had it for years. Never used it with kids, but it held up fine with us adults. The tents like you suggested are pretty easy to set up, and they are good in windy conditions. I used to use cabin tents with actual tent poles and found more than not they would break in big winds. Yours will change its shape, but spring back.

One time I was at Eastern WA, and we were out water skiing and when we got back to the cabin tent, the actual walls and roof ripped right off and blew away. The floor was still staked down. I have never and anything happen in a dome tent like that. I have had winds push the roof down to my face, but it always sprung back.

Now I glamp. Although I do have an overland tent trailer.

Have fun and post pics of your tent and your trip!
Yea I’m leaning towards that one. Seems like it would make a good starter tent especially at that price.
 
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