Do I scrap it?

Pokahpolice

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2020
Messages
506
Location
Maine
The old girl is struggling. The frame is toast. Full disclosure, I knew this when I bought it. I paid $3,000 for the rust bucket and got 3 winters out of it. That's about what I expected and I can't say that this was a poor purchase. I've actually gotten a lot more than I expected out of it. Originally, it was supposed to just be a plow/yard truck.

Here is where my conundrum lies. I really like the TJ. I ended up dumping about $8K into it knowing it was on it's last leg. So the question is do I
A.) Fix this one correctly (if that's even possible)
B.) Weld in a bunch of ugly patches and get a few more years out of it or
C.) Shop for a decent used TJ where I can swap the parts I've purchased.

What do you think boys
 
I have a habit of bringing cars back from the dead when I really shouldn't so I may be biased. Frames can be found to swap in and if you are mechanically inclined it can be done.

Considering you have a bunch of money in it and like it, I vote fix it if you have the ability to do so. Any pictures?

EDIT...everyone from out west or down south is going to say scrap it or part it out. In the rust belt good ones are getting harder and harder to find. So fix it or spend a bunch on a better one.
 
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$8K into it like in aftermarket stuff or just repairs? If its mods id look for a frame. You've got so much into it now it seems it would be a shame to scrap it.
 
I like these kind of problems to answer to because they make mine small. If the year was before 2006 or when the car manufactures built cars because that's what you wanted, instead of enforcing the car on you. Because that's what the govt. says your going to have, (because they know better). I am also confident that everybody on this forum can build a jeep better than any regulated manufacturing co. that out performs (in every way, including efficiency) and more useful to any specific need that last longer. Something the car manufactures don't want. And Cheaper with more options. Right, I strongly vote build it and you will like it. May God Bless,DL
 
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B.) Weld in a bunch of pretty (Safe T Cap) patches and get a few more years out of it.
 
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B.) Weld in a bunch of pretty (Safe T Cap) patches and get a few more years out of it.
Rebuild, new frame and go from there. Include friends (see how good they are) Wife/girlfriend (not both and hopefully one option), relatives (for showing off opportunities), end result........... better than what you can buy. May God Bless; DL

Just think after a while you may only have a electric jeep to choose/forced to buy.

Then see how that mixes with mud, water, and other corrosive items. Shocking.
 
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The old girl is struggling. The frame is toast. Full disclosure, I knew this when I bought it. I paid $3,000 for the rust bucket and got 3 winters out of it. That's about what I expected and I can't say that this was a poor purchase. I've actually gotten a lot more than I expected out of it. Originally, it was supposed to just be a plow/yard truck.

Here is where my conundrum lies. I really like the TJ. I ended up dumping about $8K into it knowing it was on it's last leg. So the question is do I
A.) Fix this one correctly (if that's even possible)
B.) Weld in a bunch of ugly patches and get a few more years out of it or
C.) Shop for a decent used TJ where I can swap the parts I've purchased.

What do you think boys
Post some pictures of your Jeep and the rust it has so members can have more information to make a judgement.
 
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Custom fabricate and new frame, stretched with coil overs, 4/3 link and a V8. Obviously.
 
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You are 11k in in total so just patch it up! If Trump is not your next President your gas prices will soon see $8+ a gallon and TJ,s will be tow away for free on the roadsides everywhere :)
 
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