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East coast vs West coast wheeling

rhanna

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Gallatin, TN
I'm still pretty early on in my Jeep offroad life so I haven't spent a ton of time researching every topic. One thing that comes up is east vs west coast wheeling.
Is it just dry/rocky wheeling vs wet/mud/sometimes rocky wheeling?
When I hear a jeep needs to be built for one or the other, why? What is it about the build for one that makes it weak for the other?

I wouldn't mind playing around with the suspension calculators but I don't know what I'm aiming for, I would think (maybe naively) you pick a tire size, decide how much wheelbase you want and then dial in the arm lengths and angles.
 
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Cross-Threaded-06TJ

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Your Jeep looks good already. So, I say.

East coast= Super Swamper LTB's, and a super heavy right foot.

West coast=Goodyear MTR's, and finesse.


That's all there is to it. ;)


Does this thread have padded walls? It may need them.....


Besides the smart ass answer. I would spend time reading some of the members here who go to great lengths to dial their suspension in and mimic their results. A well setup Jeep will perform well East or West. Scan the build thread sections and there a many who show the ways to success.
 
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rhanna

rhanna

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Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2020
Messages
549
Location
Gallatin, TN
Your Jeep looks good already. So, I say.

East coast= Super Swamper LTB's, and a super heavy right foot.

West coast=Goodyear MTR's, and finesse.


That's all there is to it. ;)


Does this thread have padded walls? It may need them.....


Besides the smart ass answer. I would spend time reading some of the members here who go to great lengths to dial their suspension in and mimic their results. A well setup Jeep will perform well East or West. Scan the build thread sections and there a many who show the ways to success.

I'm not really trying to start a Savvy vs metalcloak type of thread.

I just know as someone with limited experience with offroading jeeps and mechanical experience it's kind of annoying to see a discussion about suspension geometry fall into a pissing contest when I really do want to know the answer. I get that I'm asking for a simplistic explanation to a very complicated and debated subject.

I don't have any plans to ever trailer my jeep out west. I just don't have to time or patience to do a trip like that.
 

Mobusaki

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Jul 20, 2018
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346
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Pennsylvania
It's way more complex than west coast vs east coast. You have all types of wheeling in both places. There's mud everywhere. There's snow in west coast and east. Big, slippery rocks in each. Sand dunes in each. The best build for all those is different. It just depends on where specifically you are wheeling.
 
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rhanna

rhanna

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Gallatin, TN
It's way more complex than west coast vs east coast. You have all types of wheeling in both places. There's mud everywhere. There's snow in west coast and east. Big, slippery rocks in each. Sand dunes in each. The best build for all those is different. It just depends on where specifically you are wheeling.

So if I'm focused on slow rock crawling there isn't much difference in build? I don't plan on sand dunes or going mudding. Although sometimes it ends up in a lot of mud, just not a big mud hole in the middle of some field.
 

Cross-Threaded-06TJ

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I'm not really trying to start a Savvy vs metalcloak type of thread.

I just know as someone with limited experience with offroading jeeps and mechanical experience it's kind of annoying to see a discussion about suspension geometry fall into a pissing contest when I really do want to know the answer. I get that I'm asking for a simplistic explanation to a very complicated and debated subject.

I don't have any plans to ever trailer my jeep out west. I just don't have to time or patience to do a trip like that.

I don't see it as you starting anything. Your Jeep is already pretty well setup, Dana 60 in the back. If your mechanical aptitude is up to suspension work. Even something like removing coils and cycling the axle through its movements to verify bump stops and shock length ETC. Then you are in the right place and asking the right questions.

The East/West thing can be a debate. Another popular modification around here is a higher clearance or even Flat crossmember. And then dialing the suspension and driveshafts ETC in around that modification. It's a proven setup that works well.
 

Fouledplugs

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Jun 19, 2017
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Alabama/North Carolina
So if I'm focused on slow rock crawling there isn't much difference in build? I don't plan on sand dunes or going mudding. Although sometimes it ends up in a lot of mud, just not a big mud hole in the middle of some field.

I would advocate for visiting some local off road parks close to you. What works there? What doesnt? What grabs your attention? What do you like and dont like when it comes to setup?

Go from there which ever direction you want.
 
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bucky

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Dec 25, 2020
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SoCal/North Dakota/ N Az
Where are the sand dunes on the east coast other than on the beach? I think the main difference between east and west is that in the western US we have more large expanses of open government land.
 
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rhanna

rhanna

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Joined
Oct 27, 2020
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549
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Gallatin, TN
I don't see it as you starting anything. Your Jeep is already pretty well setup, Dana 60 in the back. If your mechanical aptitude is up to suspension work. Even something like removing coils and cycling the axle through its movements to verify bump stops and shock length ETC. Then you are in the right place and asking the right questions.

The East/West thing can be a debate. Another popular modification around here is a higher clearance or even Flat crossmember. And then dialing the suspension and driveshafts ETC in around that modification. It's a proven setup that works well.

It isn't set up perfect in the back because the rear axle will hit the gas tank skid. I know I'm at the limit sort of speak before things start to get really expensive (37"+ tires and modifications for that) It's hard not to dream bigger when one group I wheel with is 40"+ on every rig.

I appreciate being able to work for it on 35s, it's just the last park I was at had a lot of smaller rocks everywhere and I was constantly getting thrown around and trying to keep up with the bigger rigs/buggies where they don't even feel those things.
 

Brianj5600

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It's way more complex than west coast vs east coast. You have all types of wheeling in both places. There's mud everywhere. There's snow in west coast and east. Big, slippery rocks in each. Sand dunes in each. The best build for all those is different. It just depends on where specifically you are wheeling.

Can you expand on what changes in set up in different areas?
 

jjvw

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Colorado, USA
Just don't

Does it matter or not? 🤣
I'm not really trying to start a Savvy vs metalcloak type of thread.

I just know as someone with limited experience with offroading jeeps and mechanical experience it's kind of annoying to see a discussion about suspension geometry fall into a pissing contest when I really do want to know the answer. I get that I'm asking for a simplistic explanation to a very complicated and debated subject.

I don't have any plans to ever trailer my jeep out west. I just don't have to time or patience to do a trip like that.

This wouldn't be a company vs company thread. What you are asking about is entirely about function.
 

Cross-Threaded-06TJ

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Mar 13, 2020
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Hamilton Montana
It isn't set up perfect in the back because the rear axle will hit the gas tank skid. I know I'm at the limit sort of speak before things start to get really expensive (37"+ tires and modifications for that) It's hard not to dream bigger when one group I wheel with is 40"+ on every rig.

I appreciate being able to work for it on 35s, it's just the last park I was at had a lot of smaller rocks everywhere and I was constantly getting thrown around and trying to keep up with the bigger rigs/buggies where they don't even feel those things.

What were your mod plans for 37"+? Your axle contacting the gas tank is resolvable several ways. I'm sure you know that already. Are these fellow wheelers on 40's other Tj's? Or larger longer rigs?
 

psrivats

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Jun 4, 2018
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4,361
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OR, USA
I'm still pretty early on in my Jeep offroad life so I haven't spent a ton of time researching every topic. One thing that comes up is east vs west coast wheeling.
Is it just dry/rocky wheeling vs wet/mud/sometimes rocky wheeling?
When I hear a jeep needs to be built for one or the other, why? What is it about the build for one that makes it weak for the other?

I wouldn't mind playing around with the suspension calculators but I don't know what I'm aiming for, I would think (maybe naively) you pick a tire size, decide how much wheelbase you want and then dial in the arm lengths and angles.

Does Jeep release a separate model for east coast and for west coast? :):devilish:

There are some additional considerations to be had for navigating wet/muddy terrain needed high tire speeds, but basics stay the same no matter the coast or the continent (unless you are building a floater for the arctic or something)..
 

ranger101

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Dec 30, 2018
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Feisty this week, aren’t we?

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