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EV thread

Plumber1

Tito's, Tacos and Trails
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CA is a wonderful place to live, right now I am sitting in my home sweating my balls off with my thermostat set at 78 deg, not doing laundry, or charging my Tesla. So as long as my shift at work does not start for few more hours I might have enough of a charge to get to work. Can hardly wait till 2035 when all new cars will be forced to me electric. :mad:


Please do not let Gavin Newsome become President 0r you be fucked like us :rolleyes:
 

Chris

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I think you hit the nail on the head when you typed “at this point in time”. Even 5 years from from now the charging, battery technology and vehicle selection will be leaps and bounds ahead of where it is today…

I agree! And at that point I'll be happy to drive one. Heck, maybe by that point they'll even be a full replacement for a ICE vehicle.
 

DavidPLindsey

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I pray after Nov. we just might see Truth about all whom have profited off of our misery. Also that those whom have lied pay back all that they have stollen plus put our supply chains back, give us a choice in what we want (not what the gov. thinks we need), put constitutional standards back in practice, (pursuit of happiness) and lastly get out of our way. Then we will all drink free bublelub and drink rainbow stew. May God Bless DL(come Lord Jesus come)
 

mxz800

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I pray after Nov. we just might see Truth about all whom have profited off of our misery. Also that those whom have lied pay back all that they have stollen plus put our supply chains back, give us a choice in what we want (not what the gov. thinks we need), put constitutional standards back in practice, (pursuit of happiness) and lastly get out of our way. Then we will all drink free bublelub and drink rainbow stew. May God Bless DL(come Lord Jesus come)

Fat chance
 

Plumber1

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I pray after Nov. we just might see Truth about all whom have profited off of our misery. Also that those whom have lied pay back all that they have stollen plus put our supply chains back, give us a choice in what we want (not what the gov. thinks we need), put constitutional standards back in practice, (pursuit of happiness) and lastly get out of our way. Then we will all drink free bublelub and drink rainbow stew. May God Bless DL(come Lord Jesus come)

We can only hope
 

BugoutJeep

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The concept of EV's are awesome and there's so much that may eventually be very exciting. What's scary is the absolute lack of reason applied to coming regulations and laws, unless the reasons ARE nefarious. The killing of any reliable way to power EVs is almost comical, but it's true which is extremely worrisome. I'm too lazy and comfortable to want to live in some apocalypse hell hole with no AC. Of course I really don't care what they have because we've got coal and natural gas on the farms and plenty of water, room to grow food or even biodiesel or ethanol (I prefer to drink this).

I really would like to get an electric UTV that I can setup in an enclosed trailer with some basic amenities and some tools and be able to charge while towing, when parked with solar and by a generator and have a backup set of batteries on board, but mainly the UTV will just be a mobile battery bank.

So far the EVs offered don't make much sense. I like smaller 4x4s, but the ones you can preorder right now weigh as much as a 1 ton and the range isn't good enough and charging during long trips especially when towing sounds like a bad dream. Oh and most of the stuff I'd consider is over $100k and it's not flexible and I don't see a long future in those vehicles/batteries. I just don't see how they can compete with some of the 50 year old equipment I've got and the 20+ year old 4x4s I've got that cost me almost nothing to own and combined are about the price of a battery replacement that I'll need every 10 years.

I think when you take into account what the battery wear is going to be, I don't think the math makes sense. Plus in 5 years there's no telling what changes will be made. I don't want to be a Beta tester by giving a company $120k and the reality is, that if you don't piece together a $70k system, assuming you don't have gas wells on your property ie $10k off-grid system, you're going to be controlled in your transportation. My $20 gas can can hold onto energy much cheaper than the equivalent battery costs.

This whole thing reminds me of nonsense from something you'd see from the USSR or the CCP. It's a joke and I really like EVs, I just don't want to be forced to buy one when they are in their infancy.

Of course even the new vehicles are just comically dumb in so many ways in the US in particular. I mean for the price and for what we know about engine tech, it's just so hard to not laugh at all the BS on these new cars and trucks to try and make them work like something the rest of the world had in the 90s for like $15k and we're spending $25k extra on band aids and regulations so you barely notice that the powerband is too far away from normal operation to be of any use that isn't racing and the MPG is still garbage. The big advantages we have are flashing lights and cameras to make us stare at the dash when we turn lanes or backup (same reason I won't buy a self defense pistol with "safeties" they are either additional items that will break or they give room to deadly habits). May as well come with a complimentary clown nose, hair, shoes and makeup.
 
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starkey480

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My wife just got a model 3 for her commute to work. We got it because my wife is boujee and likes nice cars, but we were spending wayyy too much on gas for her Volvo S90. She also wanted HOV lane access which you need full electric car for in AZ. We also got the model 3 long range because we do so many road trips for track meets every spring and summer. The long range we got has an estimated range of 370 miles. Real world energy consumption on my wife’s commutes shows she would get 360 miles of range driving 65 mph to work.

Round trip, she drives about 100 miles each day going to work and to workout after. We’ve gathered this typical day uses about 24.6 kWh. Our yearly average electricity cost is $.0985 per kWh. So it is costs us $2.42 each day to go 100 miles. Compare that to our price of gas right now, $4 for unleaded, she is getting 165 miles per the cost of 1 gallon of gas. Adding all of this up with car payments and all that and we are saving money each month with the Tesla versus her Volvo S90. Not to mention the reduced costs of maintenance since we won’t need brakes or oil changes or any of that.

As far as driving the thing goes, I love it. It’s insanely fun to drive a car that is that fast and quiet at the same time. I know everyone likes the sound of cars but it is very pleasant zooming around town in quiet comfort as well.
 
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Apparition

Apparition

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Round trip, she drives about 100 miles each day going to work and to workout after. We’ve gathered this typical day uses about 24.6 kWh. Our yearly average electricity cost is $.0985 per kWh. So it is costs us $2.42 each day to go 100 miles. Compare that to our price of gas right now, $4 for unleaded, she is getting 165 miles per the cost of 1 gallon of gas.
I just don't see the government letting this happen in the future.

Edit:
https://www.consumerreports.org/hyb...will-evs-be-charged-for-road-use-a1206432507/
 
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TKFX

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Are they viable? Discuss pros and cons.

https://thebluestateconservative.co...s-will-save-the-planet-is-quickly-unraveling/

The ‘Electric Vehicles Will Save The Planet’ Farce Is Unraveling Quickly
by Steve MacDonaldAugust 21, 2022

An auto club in Germany that claims 21 million members ran some controlled charging test electric vehicles to see how efficient that process was. The results put another nail in the value coffin. Not only are they expensive to buy and own, but the average charge also wastes up to 13% of the electricity.

Put another way, the consumer is charged for all the electricity required to fully charge the battery, which is as much as 13% more than the battery can hold.

So, imagine pouring two gallons of gasoline on the ground every time you filled a 20-gallon tank. People would lose their collective minds. But that will be standard for every charge of every vehicle in the utopian electric fleet of the future.

ADAC’s Ecotest calculated the kWh needed to fully charge a range of electric vehicle batteries.

The result of the test under the same conditions for all electric car models: E-car drivers have to plan for a particularly large amount of power loss for some models – but everyone has to pay extra. According to the ADAC Ecotest, a 100 kWh battery in a Tesla Model X100D actually needs 108.3 kWh. The Kia e-Niro Spirit has 72.3 kWh for a 64 kWh battery. The Jaguar I-PACE EV400 also needs at least 10 kWh more for a 90 kWh battery.

With electricity prices scheduled to double in New Hampshire (as an example) and with the cost of EVs still out of the range of most middle and lower-income families, throwing money out the window with every charge might just as well be another tax.

Line loss or transformer loss is baked into the infrastructure. There is no way to transmit electricity without waste (primarily) in the form of heat. Anywhere from 8-15% or more of the electricity generated by power stations is lost before it gets to you. A carbon footprint problem we’re supposed to ignore.

But not in the ADAC tests. The consumer pays immediately for the loss of every kWh that exceeded the actual electricity needed to charge the battery.

Dark Future
At present, the infrastructure to charge the existing fleet is inadequate. Rolling brownouts and blackouts are predicted everywhere. There is no plan that puts enough wind or solar into operation, maybe ever, to address the growing demand without EVs. There isn’t enough land for the equipment needed to create that much electricity unless the plan is to need less.

With rates skyrocketing, charging will become unaffordable to all but the most well-off, and we’ve postulated repeatedly that this was always the goal. A point they admit, including after the release of the original Green New Deal, whose author (we can’t ever let you forget this) said, “Do you guys think of it as a climate thing?” Chakrabarti continued. “Because we really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing.”

No air travel for you and the end of private transportation.

The goal is to force your mobility profile back into the 19th century. Trains, horses, walking. The only other reasonable explanation is that they are all idiots, and while the rank-and-file prog parrots might be considered that stupid, the people at the top are not.

They’re evil.

What a shit article. Imagine pouring 14 gallons of gasoline on the ground every time you filled a 20-gallon tank. That's what happens now because gasoline engines are so inefficient.
 
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rasband

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The only way they could stop it would be to raise electricity prices in general since we charge at home. That would suck a lot for everyone, EV owner or not.

Colorado is putting a big chunk of that missed revenue into registration for EVs. So the cost shifts a bit to once a year large expense from every little fillup.

Another thing they are doing is requiring smart meters. My guess is that will start metering the electricity usage and estimate what is used for what, likely making the rate dependent.
 

starkey480

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Colorado is putting a big chunk of that missed revenue into registration for EVs. So the cost shifts a bit to once a year large expense from every little fillup.

Another thing they are doing is requiring smart meters. My guess is that will start metering the electricity usage and estimate what is used for what, likely making the rate dependent.
I think we had to pay an EV registration tax as well. Fingers crossed I get to enjoy my cheap operating costs for a while.
 

rasband

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I think we had to pay an EV registration tax as well. Fingers crossed I get to enjoy my cheap operating costs for a while.

You will, they want to incentivise it for now. They are pretty sweet, but my wife gets to pick the next car and she wants 7 seats for some unknown reason.
 

TKFX

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Colorado is putting a big chunk of that missed revenue into registration for EVs. So the cost shifts a bit to once a year large expense from every little fillup.

Another thing they are doing is requiring smart meters. My guess is that will start metering the electricity usage and estimate what is used for what, likely making the rate dependent.

The smart meters won't ever be able to tell what exactly the energy is being used for. It will just allow the electric company to see your current home usage and usage based on different times of day. Our electric company has a time of use plans which makes electricity costs at night really cheap (9pm - 8am) specifically for charging EVs overnight. You can choose between that plan or the tiered normal plan. These types of plans are only possible with a smart meter.
 

BugoutJeep

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My wife just got a model 3 for her commute to work. We got it because my wife is boujee and likes nice cars, but we were spending wayyy too much on gas for her Volvo S90. She also wanted HOV lane access which you need full electric car for in AZ. We also got the model 3 long range because we do so many road trips for track meets every spring and summer. The long range we got has an estimated range of 370 miles. Real world energy consumption on my wife’s commutes shows she would get 360 miles of range driving 65 mph to work.

Round trip, she drives about 100 miles each day going to work and to workout after. We’ve gathered this typical day uses about 24.6 kWh. Our yearly average electricity cost is $.0985 per kWh. So it is costs us $2.42 each day to go 100 miles. Compare that to our price of gas right now, $4 for unleaded, she is getting 165 miles per the cost of 1 gallon of gas. Adding all of this up with car payments and all that and we are saving money each month with the Tesla versus her Volvo S90.

When my wife was commuting, we were going to buy an EV, but as soon as the commutes were gone and the only stuff left was mostly towing and 4x4 besides the occasional 300ish mi trip one way to see her family, the practicality went away for our needs. I wouldn't mind some type of plug in 4x4 we could tow with to go see family, but I'm not dropping $100k either.

I have too many towing needs that are closer to the 15k lb range and I'm not seeing an EV truck that looks appropriate yet.
The smart meters won't ever be able to tell what exactly the energy is being used for. It will just allow the electric company to see your current home usage and usage based on different times of day. Our electric company has a time of use plans which makes electricity costs at night really cheap (9pm - 8am) specifically for charging EVs overnight. You can choose between that plan or the tiered normal plan. These types of plans are only possible with a smart meter.

They will likely make sure your charger is "certified" and it can be hooked directly for the power company to turn on and off. You'll probably be able to charge 110, but nothing with a special charger.

You see these on various large appliances at times. Sometimes you get discounts to hook up appliances to these devices already.
 
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mxz800

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The concept of EV's are awesome and there's so much that may eventually be very exciting. What's scary is the absolute lack of reason applied to coming regulations and laws, unless the reasons ARE nefarious. The killing of any reliable way to power EVs is almost comical, but it's true which is extremely worrisome. I'm too lazy and comfortable to want to live in some apocalypse hell hole with no AC. Of course I really don't care what they have because we've got coal and natural gas on the farms and plenty of water, room to grow food or even biodiesel or ethanol (I prefer to drink this).

I really would like to get an electric UTV that I can setup in an enclosed trailer with some basic amenities and some tools and be able to charge while towing, when parked with solar and by a generator and have a backup set of batteries on board, but mainly the UTV will just be a mobile battery bank.
Have you looked at this:

Yamaha UMAX
This distinctive vehicle is offered in both gas and electric versions with upgraded seats compared to a golf cart, an automotive-style dash and some impressive specifications. A gas-powered model can haul over 800 pounds of cargo in the rear dump area, can tow up to 1,500 pounds and will operate at a top speed of 19.5 mile per hour. It is ready for serious work with a lifted suspension, 23” tires, a front brush guard, fender flares, a large dump bed tailgate that can be opened with one hand and four-wheel brakes. While the electric version is as quiet as a golf car, the electronic fuel injected gas powered engine creates surprisingly less noise than most gas-powered units thanks to their innovative Yamaha-exclusive QuieTech EFI® technology.
 

BugoutJeep

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Have you looked at this:

Yamaha UMAX
This distinctive vehicle is offered in both gas and electric versions with upgraded seats compared to a golf cart, an automotive-style dash and some impressive specifications. A gas-powered model can haul over 800 pounds of cargo in the rear dump area, can tow up to 1,500 pounds and will operate at a top speed of 19.5 mile per hour. It is ready for serious work with a lifted suspension, 23” tires, a front brush guard, fender flares, a large dump bed tailgate that can be opened with one hand and four-wheel brakes. While the electric version is as quiet as a golf car, the electronic fuel injected gas powered engine creates surprisingly less noise than most gas-powered units thanks to their innovative Yamaha-exclusive QuieTech EFI® technology.

I think I'm going to start with a simple EV mountain bike and then continue to let some tech get better. I think Polaris or someone has an EV offering, but I don't know much about it and really I want to see Honda and some others come out with something competitive and then just choose something that's hopefully priced in a way that makes sense.

However typically Yamaha has pretty good stuff, so that's a bit exciting.

I really think a larger truck could really be ideal with EV, if they'd incorporate a hybrid stance with a nice sized generator on board to keep the batteries feeding a few ~300hp motors and heck I've done little math, maybe much smaller hp motors. I don't care about speed other than highway speeds.

My biggest worry is that we're not securing our grid with reliable power. That's pretty scary and I'll be fine and I've got some solar, but it's a PITA and I really don't need more headaches. At some point I'm just moving out to the farm. getting several nat gas generators and I'm plumbing gas to workshops and other structures on the farm and just burn nat gas.

We really should build reliable energy first and then add as much of anything else as possible so we use as little reliable energy as possible, but we need to keep power reliable or else we're not going to see a cleaner, freer or more prosperous future. If we're scrambling over resources, I can point you an area that's going to see conflict.
 
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