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Has anyone tried this hardtop sound deadening / insulation?

RYAN17

Member
Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
85
Location
MA
Has anyone tried this stuff. Im looking to sound deaden and insulate a little without breaking the bank. I saw some nicer stuff for like $200 but didn’t want to spend that much right now. I know that you get what you pay for but I didnt know if this stuff could work for a shorter term solution.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0833W9KPX/?tag=wranglerorg-20

568D78B4-5BE8-4576-B264-85C01BE354C8.png
 

LukesfirstJeep

TJ Addict
Joined
Aug 2, 2018
Messages
1,177
Location
Central PA
I used the Hot Head with sound deadening strips on my hard top, and the difference was noticeable. It's still not as quiet as a european touring sedan, but most of the noise I hear is from the tires.

Hooke brand accessories are imported and their results are hit or miss. I'm more familiar with their metal bumpers, where the powder coating isn't very durable.
 
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Zorba

"The Veiled Male"
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
8,925
Location
Merritt Island, Fl
I couldn't care less about noise reduction - but heat reduction is another matter entirely! Heat reduction is directly proportional to thickness, all other considerations being equal (same material, etc). 3/16" isn't much, but I'm sure it does *something*.
 

TJartist

Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2021
Messages
70
Location
Wisconsin
I have begun the sound deadening/insulation path, starting with the tub (Nioco), as per other threads here. I have been investigating sound deadening the hard top as well as insulating. I have watched many you-tube videos as well as threads here and on companies websites. I was ready to pull the trigger on one of the after market makers when I could make my own headliner/insulation cheaper and better than the $250 most were charging. Also there were several complaints about the glue becoming unstuck. So I started by adding several short pieces of Nioco sound deadening material in-between the ribs of the hardtop, next I will create an insulation headliner from some material I decide. I was going to start with hard pink insulation sheets but I am leaning more towards a softer material. I will be at the big box stores this weekend to decide on the material. Hardest part was trying to make cardboard templates because the roof slightly tapers towards the rear and for the cut outs around the speakers on roll bar. Once I find the underneath material its just a mater of wrapping it with headliner material of my choice. I'll keep you posted as to my choice.
 

Wtrask

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 26, 2019
Messages
376
Location
Maine
Save your money and just get a roll of foil faces duct insulation and some outdoor carpet from lowes. It works awesome and looks better.
 

Zorba

"The Veiled Male"
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
8,925
Location
Merritt Island, Fl
I have begun the sound deadening/insulation path, starting with the tub (Nioco), as per other threads here. I have been investigating sound deadening the hard top as well as insulating. I have watched many you-tube videos as well as threads here and on companies websites. I was ready to pull the trigger on one of the after market makers when I could make my own headliner/insulation cheaper and better than the $250 most were charging. Also there were several complaints about the glue becoming unstuck. So I started by adding several short pieces of Nioco sound deadening material in-between the ribs of the hardtop, next I will create an insulation headliner from some material I decide. I was going to start with hard pink insulation sheets but I am leaning more towards a softer material. I will be at the big box stores this weekend to decide on the material. Hardest part was trying to make cardboard templates because the roof slightly tapers towards the rear and for the cut outs around the speakers on roll bar. Once I find the underneath material its just a mater of wrapping it with headliner material of my choice. I'll keep you posted as to my choice.
I'll be interested in what you come up with. I don't give a tinker's damn about sound deadening (if you want quiet, drive an electric), but am *VERY* interested in heat insulation in the hard top. "Hot Heads" are outrageously expensive!
 

cliffish

TJ Expert
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2017
Messages
4,729
Location
St James, NY, United States
I have begun the sound deadening/insulation path, starting with the tub (Nioco), as per other threads here. I have been investigating sound deadening the hard top as well as insulating. I have watched many you-tube videos as well as threads here and on companies websites. I was ready to pull the trigger on one of the after market makers when I could make my own headliner/insulation cheaper and better than the $250 most were charging. Also there were several complaints about the glue becoming unstuck. So I started by adding several short pieces of Nioco sound deadening material in-between the ribs of the hardtop, next I will create an insulation headliner from some material I decide. I was going to start with hard pink insulation sheets but I am leaning more towards a softer material. I will be at the big box stores this weekend to decide on the material. Hardest part was trying to make cardboard templates because the roof slightly tapers towards the rear and for the cut outs around the speakers on roll bar. Once I find the underneath material its just a mater of wrapping it with headliner material of my choice. I'll keep you posted as to my choice.
I did the same on my previous JKU, noico in between and hot heads over it, If I rember correctly I also use 3M carpet adheasive to make everything stuck. It definately made a difference in noise, even the stereo sounded better.
 

cliffish

TJ Expert
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2017
Messages
4,729
Location
St James, NY, United States
I'll be interested in what you come up with. I don't give a tinker's damn about sound deadening (if you want quiet, drive an electric), but am *VERY* interested in heat insulation in the hard top. "Hot Heads" are outrageously expensive!
Go through @Chris JK forum, I bet you will get a few threads on hot heads, especially from the desert people on the heat reduction. I used it on my previous JKU but being in NY heat reduction is not a factor.
 
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TJartist

Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2021
Messages
70
Location
Wisconsin
So here is my update on adding a headliner. First I read as much as I could find in this forum and others about different products. I considered many different products which I think are probably pretty good, however most were very expensive and not worth what I wanted to spend on a beat around jeep. If it was a luxury vehicle than I may have purchased an aftermarket headliner. So here is the situation. I have a hard top on for most of 7 months here in colder Wisconsin. I wanted some sound deadening as well as insulation as well as an improvement in looks. I realize that it is a jeep and inherently noisy etc. but what I did I believe made an improvement in all areas. As previously posted I removed all seats and carpeting and put Noico sound deadening material in whole tub area. I also added weather stripping to some pretty big air gaps along where the hardtop sits along the windshield. So now on to the headliner.
1. first I made card board templates of both the front and rear hardtop. I noticed that it slightly tapers towards the back and tried to account for this. Cutting the curves around the sound bar was a little challenge.
2. I used 1/2 pink insulation and layed the cardboard template out on it and traced out the pattern. I than held the pink insulation up to the roof and made some additional cuts because the thickness and curve of the roof and rear dome light.
3. I used two different glues to adhere the indoor/outdoor carpet to the pink insulation. First I used 3m spray glue on the first panel but used it all up so for the second panel I used foam board glue in a caulk tube. Both have there advantages and disadvantages. Both were really easy to work with. I should say I pre-cut the headliner material as close to what I needed. I also wanted to use one piece to cover the front and back all in one piece without a seam (meaning I wrapped the whole piece of pink insulation in headliner material). I wanted to do this so that I only had to apply velcro hooks to the top of the hardtop and none to the back of the headliner as most others do. make sure to use foam board glue not construction adhesive as the solvents may dissolve the pink insulation. Also you can use any thickness of insulation as it is really light. I felt 1/2 was the perfect strength and rigid yet flexible to make the slight curve of the hard top at the sides.
4. I cut some slits in the carpet to make it curve for the sound bar and to do neat corners. I also used 3/8 staples to help hold the headliner tight as I stretched it as I glued it so I would not get any wrinkles. I will have to see which will hold up the longest: 3m spray headliner glue or the foam board glue. Both seemed permanent.
5. I adhered several pieces of the Noico sound deadening material to the spaces in between the hard top roof. It took up some of the roof vibrations as well as took up some space if I needed to be more level with the ribs. I then used self-adhering velcro "hook" to the ribs.
6. I took the finished panels and lifted them in place and pushed them to the hard top and rubbed my hand along where I knew the ribs/velcro was. The carpet stuck instantly to the velcro. If I ever want to remove the headliner all I have to do is to grab the edge and pull the panels away from the velcro. It is all very simple and secure. And yes I did save money, but is was not about the money. It was getting sound deadening along with insulation as well as a nice matching headliner. So here are the pictures:
2-glueing carpet.jpg
3-finished panels.jpg
4-hook velcro on ribs.jpg
5-headliner up cargo area.jpg
6-headliner up-front.jpg


1-layout carpet.jpg
 

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M

Moon Eyes

Guest
Yes I have used this product. Installed it last fall about this time. For major sound deadening,not the product but for some heat retention works nicely. Installation is easy and I installed black color. In Wisconsin not so much to keep the heat out but the heat in . Heated seat installed at the same time worked great also.
 

Kenneth G Zinis

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 6, 2018
Messages
539
Location
Bethlehem, PA
So here is my update on adding a headliner. First I read as much as I could find in this forum and others about different products. I considered many different products which I think are probably pretty good, however most were very expensive and not worth what I wanted to spend on a beat around jeep. If it was a luxury vehicle than I may have purchased an aftermarket headliner. So here is the situation. I have a hard top on for most of 7 months here in colder Wisconsin. I wanted some sound deadening as well as insulation as well as an improvement in looks. I realize that it is a jeep and inherently noisy etc. but what I did I believe made an improvement in all areas. As previously posted I removed all seats and carpeting and put Noico sound deadening material in whole tub area. I also added weather stripping to some pretty big air gaps along where the hardtop sits along the windshield. So now on to the headliner.
1. first I made card board templates of both the front and rear hardtop. I noticed that it slightly tapers towards the back and tried to account for this. Cutting the curves around the sound bar was a little challenge.
2. I used 1/2 pink insulation and layed the cardboard template out on it and traced out the pattern. I than held the pink insulation up to the roof and made some additional cuts because the thickness and curve of the roof and rear dome light.
3. I used two different glues to adhere the indoor/outdoor carpet to the pink insulation. First I used 3m spray glue on the first panel but used it all up so for the second panel I used foam board glue in a caulk tube. Both have there advantages and disadvantages. Both were really easy to work with. I should say I pre-cut the headliner material as close to what I needed. I also wanted to use one piece to cover the front and back all in one piece without a seam (meaning I wrapped the whole piece of pink insulation in headliner material). I wanted to do this so that I only had to apply velcro hooks to the top of the hardtop and none to the back of the headliner as most others do. make sure to use foam board glue not construction adhesive as the solvents may dissolve the pink insulation. Also you can use any thickness of insulation as it is really light. I felt 1/2 was the perfect strength and rigid yet flexible to make the slight curve of the hard top at the sides.
4. I cut some slits in the carpet to make it curve for the sound bar and to do neat corners. I also used 3/8 staples to help hold the headliner tight as I stretched it as I glued it so I would not get any wrinkles. I will have to see which will hold up the longest: 3m spray headliner glue or the foam board glue. Both seemed permanent.
5. I adhered several pieces of the Noico sound deadening material to the spaces in between the hard top roof. It took up some of the roof vibrations as well as took up some space if I needed to be more level with the ribs. I then used self-adhering velcro "hook" to the ribs.
6. I took the finished panels and lifted them in place and pushed them to the hard top and rubbed my hand along where I knew the ribs/velcro was. The carpet stuck instantly to the velcro. If I ever want to remove the headliner all I have to do is to grab the edge and pull the panels away from the velcro. It is all very simple and secure. And yes I did save money, but is was not about the money. It was getting sound deadening along with insulation as well as a nice matching headliner. So here are the pictures:View attachment 289355View attachment 289356View attachment 289357View attachment 289358View attachment 289359

View attachment 289354
Thanks for the advice and details provided. Where did you get the fabric, it looks great and nice quality
 

TJartist

Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2021
Messages
70
Location
Wisconsin
The fabric came from either Menards or Home Depot. it is usually listed as indoor/outdoor carpeting. Mine has been installed in the jeep per the pic above for several months now. I forgot it was even their. It is nice sound deadening plus some insulating value due to the pink insulation board. and it was so simple to do since the jeeps roof is pretty flat, square and straight.
 

Kenneth G Zinis

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 6, 2018
Messages
539
Location
Bethlehem, PA
The fabric came from either Menards or Home Depot. it is usually listed as indoor/outdoor carpeting. Mine has been installed in the jeep per the pic above for several months now. I forgot it was even their. It is nice sound deadening plus some insulating value due to the pink insulation board. and it was so simple to do since the jeeps roof is pretty flat, square and straight.
Thanks TJartist
The fabric came from either Menards or Home Depot. it is usually listed as indoor/outdoor carpeting. Mine has been installed in the jeep per the pic above for several months now. I forgot it was even their. It is nice sound deadening plus some insulating value due to the pink insulation board. and it was so simple to do since the jeeps roof is pretty flat, square and straight.
TJartist, it's surprising it's carpeting, how it looks like you folded and finished it so nicely
 

SPECWAR

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 2, 2020
Messages
519
Location
Plain Township Ohio
I went with the 1” thick foam Boom Mat. Installed it over the summer while the top was hanging from my garage ceiling.
I painted the interior of my top about 2 weeks before installing the mat, so I used an aggressive spray adhesive to insure it would stay in place.
100% warmer and quieter in conjunction with the floor insulation/heat shield I also added.
074E29EF-0445-49B6-BEEC-0D177BF48C2D.jpeg
 
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Ron Hall

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 14, 2018
Messages
282
Location
Arkansas
I went with the 1” thick foam Boom Mat. Installed it over the summer while the top was hanging from my garage ceiling.
I painted the interior of my top about 2 weeks before installing the mat, so I used an aggressive spray adhesive to insure it would stay in place.
100% warmer and quieter in conjunction with the floor insulation/heat shield I also added.

View attachment 298804

How effective was this material in blocking outside heat inside your jeep
 

SPECWAR

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 2, 2020
Messages
519
Location
Plain Township Ohio
How effective was this material in blocking outside heat inside your jeep

I remove the hard top in the spring and it stays off all summer so I don’t put many miles on it in the warmer months. However in the few times that I have had to reinstall it in the summer, you can definitely tell the boom helps in keeping it cooler. Especially when it’s on and I run the AC.