How good is a Savvy / Currie lift really?

PNW_LJ

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So after perusing this forum, it’s pretty clear that for a mild build on ~35s, the full Savvy/Currie 4” lift is probably the best bolt on lift kit out there.

I’m all for “buy once, cry one” when it comes to offroad mods. What I’d like to know is how much better is the Savvy kit as compared to a “lesser” yet complete short arm kit, let’s say from Rubicon Express or MetalCloak. Both would include 8 adjustable short arms, adjustable track bars, springs, bumpstops etc.

When I think of how Savvy is better I think better quality components that last longer. Is there any functional difference beyond that?

Say better flex from the design of the joints? Or better designed track bars/arms that don’t limit uptravel? Or springs that are longer for the same lift height to increase downtravel?

Any responses appreciated!
 
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So after perusing this forum, it’s pretty clear that for a mild build on ~35s, the full Savvy/Currie 4” lift is probably the best bolt on lift kit out there.

I’m all for “buy once, cry one” when it comes to offroad mods. What I’d like to know is how much better is the Savvy kit as compared to a “lesser” yet complete short arm kit, let’s say from Rubicon Express or MetalCloak. Both would include 8 adjustable short arms, adjustable track bars, springs, bumpstops etc.

When I think of how Savvy is better I think better quality components that last longer. Is there any functional difference beyond that?

Say better flex from the design of the joints? Or better designed track bars/arms that don’t limit uptravel? Or springs that are longer for the same lift height to increase downtravel?

Any responses appreciated!

What I understand it is the joints that are better with the Currie stuff.
 
You should get some seasoned guys all over this one-

I’m careful with the word quality because it is pretty subjective-

One feature is the serviceable, rebuildable johnny joint ends Mr. Currie designed give a wide degree of rotation, and these are used on both ends which means the mounts aren’t stressed when you flex. This is a significant difference from a lot of lifts that use clevite bushings on one end or both. If you ever break a bracket on the trail like I did you will appreciate this.


Also some joints that are called “johnny joints” are poorly made copies- and once you have some brands of lifts you can’t switch all the ends to the real deal due to the thread size and length. A lot of companies borrow from their reputation and use Currie joints on their arms.

Secondly the double adjustable feature makes getting dialed in easier. A lot easier.

The arms can take the abuse- that has been proven, and they also offer a lighter aluminum option.

The company’s experience also means lengths and adjustability range will be where it needs to be for most builds.

The front uppers are designed to work with their johnny joints in the axle, making you complete the lift and eliminate 2 clevites that do no need to be there- plus you get a larger bolt and a stronger right front upper mount if you go all the way. I see a lot of lifts, all brands, where every joint is new but the 2 front uppers- they will be 17 years old or so and the owner wonders why it still has axle movement issues.

if you are looking for a kit from a company with a competition back ground, that has been tested and proven in the hardest terrain, and don’t mind spending the money, I believe a lot of guys on here will tell you to give them a call.

I gave a lot of thought to their lift for my newest project, but ultimately went with a clayton short arm with Gyro joint ends - I wanted to try something new, wanted low maintenance and high resistance to mud and water for our terrain. I did use Currie’s joints and bracket kit in my front axle. It won’t see near the stress in it’s lifetime some rigs see every trail ride.

I also love Currie’s shift cable. They are the premier company in the Jeep world. All the hard core guys swear by them.
 
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I'm happy with the Johnny Joints and haven't experienced any squeaking. Not looking forward to it, though.....

As far as abuse, I don't rock crawl as much as I used to when I lived in CA. Just not a lot of those kinds of trails here in WY so not a huge amount of that kind of abuse on my RockJock system. I can tell you that for all of their faults, I beat the living shit out of my RE lift with zero failures of the arms themselves. Their bushings, on the other hand,...not so much. So the cheaper stuff can suit you too, depending.
 
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Savvy $3,395 - Currie components other than control arms which are all double adjustable. That will save you tin headache down the road. https://savvyoffroad.com/product/ce-9801hsr/

Currie $3,156 - full Johnny joint arms with double adjustable uppers https://www.rockjock4x4.com/CE-9801HSL

Metalcloak $2,539 - all arms are double adjustable which is good. However, read through forum you find concerns with joint design, track bar design. Plus unless you want to keep disconnects in front will need either anti-rock or sway-lock ($500 minimum) so you are at basically same price as first two to be comparable.

RE $1,775 - same comments as Metalcloak although I think RE joints get less love. Again will need to add anti-rock or sway-lock to be comparable. All lower arms are non-adjustable which to me would be a hard NO. https://rubiconexpress.com/Suspension/Rubicon-Express-Super-Flex-3-5-Suspension-System-RE7001.aspx?t_c=1&t_s=38&t_pt=3533&t_pn=R/ERE7001

The only one that gives measurable savings is RE and at least IMO you have to give up a lot. As long as is in stock I would go with the Savvy kit and not second guess it.
 
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What I understand it is the joints that are better with the Currie stuff.

You should get some seasoned guys all over this one-

I’m careful with the word quality because it is pretty subjective-

One feature is the serviceable, rebuildable johnny joint ends Mr. Currie designed give a wide degree of rotation, and these are used on both ends which means the mounts aren’t stressed when you flex. This is a significant difference from a lot of lifts that use clevite bushings on one end or both. Also some joints that are called “johnny joints” are poorly made copies- and once you have some brands of lifts you can’t switch all the ends to real deal due to the thread size and length.

Secondly the double adjustable feature makes getting dialed in easier. A lot easier.

The arms can take the abuse- that has been proven, and they also offer a lighter aluminum option.

The company’s experience also means lengths and adjustability range will be where it needs to be for most builds.

The front uppers require johnny joints in the axle, making you complete the lift and eliminate 2 clevites that do no need to be there- plus you get a larger bolt and a stronger right front upper mount if you go all the way.

if you are looking for a kit from a company with a competition back ground, that has been tested and proven in the hardest terrain, and don’t mind spending the money, I believe a lot of guys on here will tell you to give them a call.


To install the Curry front axle bushings, do you need to drill/press out the stock ones?


Good idea on bringing in some experts, let me see if I can.

@Chris
@mrblaine
@Jerry Bransford
 
What I understand it is the joints that are better with the Currie stuff.

That’s been my conclusion as well. Maybe there are some other pros to the Curry lift that the old timers can chime in on.
 
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To install the Curry front axle bushings, do you need to drill/press out the stock ones?


Good idea on bringing in some experts, let me see if I can.

@Chris
@mrblaine
@Jerry Bransford

Those guys know all you need to know and then some.

The one at the diff presses out, the new one presses in -

At the passenger side, one mod is to slice the bracket, weld in the tombstone kit and joint, paint and you are all set. There are other ways to get there, my knowledge is limited.
 
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One feature is the serviceable, rebuildable johnny joint ends Mr. Currie designed give a wide degree of rotation, and these are used on both ends which means the mounts aren’t stressed when you flex.

I need to do more research on the Johnny Joint, but would I be correct in assuming that the other major benefit is this “wide degree of rotation” means less binding during articulation, theoretically meaning more flex?
 
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All lower arms are non-adjustable which to me would be a hard NO.

How come? Assuming that you don’t plan on changing the ride height any more, and that the “pre-made” control arm length is fine, what scenario would make one want to play around with control arm length?
 
The only one that gives measurable savings is RE and at least IMO you have to give up a lot. As long as is in stock I would go with the Savvy kit and not second guess it.

Interesting, this is something I’ll have to think about more.

I’m all for building with quality parts, but with my limited broke college kid budget 😂, I’m pondering whether it’s worth it to pay double the price of a RE lift for better joints.

Again, just trying to get some info! If there is a significant functional difference in quality, I’m all for delaying my lift purchase by a couple more months so I can save up the $$$$
 
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You said 35s right. So even if you can get away without SYE and new rear driveshaft (some LJs can) you are still going to need to be able to dial in pinion angles front/rear. This is all done via control arm adjustment so I think you can see how fixed arms truly limit the setup.
 
I need to do more research on the Johnny Joint, but would I be correct in assuming that the other major benefit is this “wide degree of rotation” means less binding during articulation, theoretically meaning more flex?

The stock arms will twist, solid arms won’t- so the joint needs more rotation so it won’t rip the mounts off-

All in all, johnny joints allow fluid movement with no slop - so basically they allow it it to move where it needs and not move where it doesn’t need to- and this matters.

As far as more flex, travel, etc, There is so much more that goes into that and then I am qualified to talk about. Blaine, JJVW and Jerry and more know tons.
 
Interesting, this is something I’ll have to think about more.

I’m all for building with quality parts, but with my limited broke college kid budget 😂, I’m pondering whether it’s worth it to pay double the price of a RE lift for better joints.

Again, just trying to get some info! If there is a significant functional difference in quality, I’m all for delaying my lift purchase by a couple more months so I can save up the $$$$

Broke Colledge Kid funds = drive like you stole. Myself, I threw a lot a funds at my Jeep as I am long past a broke Colledge kid.

Hold on to your money and just go enjoy what you have.
 
Broke Colledge Kid funds = drive like you stole. Myself, I threw a lot a funds at my Jeep as I am long past a broke Colledge kid.

Hold on to your money and just go enjoy what you have.

😂 Wish I could do that, but the bug’s bit me too hard!

In all seriousness tho, while I’m far, far from being an expert, I’ve been fortunate to have helped build several rigs up until this point, from IFS mitsubishi on 35s, samurai on 38s, JT on 40s and others. I currently “own” (title is at the bank lol), a JKUR on 35s that I’ve done the Rubicon trail with. So ideally, I’d like a rig with similar capabilities.

I’d like to say that an LJ on 35s is what my dream rig would be. If it takes me 8 months, to save up for the proper setup, then so be it.
 
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You said 35s right. So even if you can get away without SYE and new rear driveshaft (some LJs can) you are still going to need to be able to dial in pinion angles front/rear. This is all done via control arm adjustment so I think you can see how fixed arms truly limit the setup.

Makes sense 👍