I Would Drive This Unimog To Work

More Unimog porn. Old vs Newer.

The rally Unimog .

Unimog-2.jpg
 
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At my old job, we had a main yard and 14 satellite yards. The yards in the mountain areas had matching 406 Moogs.
They were all equipped with front & rear PTO drives. The rear attachments consisted of a backhoe and posthole digger.
On the front they had, a loader bucket, a 10' long 4 piece articulating snow blade, a fixed angle V-blade and a snow blower attachment.
IIRC, they had 6 gear shift levers. 4 for the manual trans and 2 for the PTO drives.
If the backhoe was being used for trenching in a straight line, the steering wheel could be locked, crawler gear selected, throttle set and you're on your way.
They were a kick to drive and operate but very cramped it the footwell area.
They were eventually phased out because of age and the cost of maintenance and repair.
 
At my old job, we had a main yard and 14 satellite yards. The yards in the mountain areas had matching 406 Moogs.
They were all equipped with front & rear PTO drives. The rear attachments consisted of a backhoe and posthole digger.
On the front they had, a loader bucket, a 10' long 4 piece articulating snow blade, a fixed angle V-blade and a snow blower attachment.
IIRC, they had 6 gear shift levers. 4 for the manual trans and 2 for the PTO drives.
If the backhoe was being used for trenching in a straight line, the steering wheel could be locked, crawler gear selected, throttle set and you're on your way.
They were a kick to drive and operate but very cramped it the footwell area.
They were eventually phased out because of age and the cost of maintenance and repair.

Of course what do you replace it with ? or I should say how many pieces of equipment ?
 
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Of course what do you replace it with ? or I should say how many pieces of equipment ?

Not all at once but, in the course of 2 fiscal years. They were replaced with 3 Cat 966 and 3 Cat 972 loaders.
And all those came the 4 yd. buckets and 10' articulating snow blades. They were powerful and comfy.
Also, and this took a few more years to acquire but they bought 4 Case backhoe's to share between the yards.

My last 5 years before retirement, I operated a Gradall XL5300. It's basically a rubber tire excavator that could be driven on the street from job to job. Mostly in flood control basins. It has 2 engines. The front 9 Litre M-Benz powered the chassis down the road and the rear Cummins powered the excavator part.

But the last 2 years of my employment, they bought a Gradall XL5100 6x6. It was a hunk-o-junk.
The beancounters "con"vinced upper "mis"managment to throw out our proposal for a 6x6 with a manual trans, in favor of a 6x6 with a computer controlled automatic trans. That thing had 3 different computer systems on it and they all had to jive with each other to even drive down the road. To explain how poorly the slush box (didn't) work. It couldn't even climb over a 10" curb. Because when you bumped against the curb, it stopped. And when you pressed the throttle pedal down, the trans computer would not let the torque converter spin up because the engine computer did not jive with why its not moving. So the 11 Litre, 6 cylinder M/Benz TD would not spool up and just stay in limp mode.
But it did have a really nice heater/AC unit and stereo system.
If it had a 13 speed manual with the double low transfer case like the 5300 did, there would be no stopping it.
 
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Not all at once but, in the course of 2 fiscal years. They were replaced with 3 Cat 966 and 3 Cat 972 loaders.
And all those came the 4 yd. buckets and 10' articulating snow blades. They were powerful and comfy.
Also, and this took a few more years to acquire but they bought 4 Case backhoe's to share between the yards.

My last 5 years before retirement, I operated a Gradall XL5300. It's basically a rubber tire excavator that could be driven on the street from job to job. Mostly in flood control basins. It has 2 engines. The front 9 Litre M-Benz powered the chassis down the road and the rear Cummins powered the excavator part.

But the last 2 years of my employment, they bought a Gradall XL5100 6x6. It was a hunk-o-junk.
The beancounters "con"vinced upper "mis"managment to throw out our proposal for a 6x6 with a manual trans, in favor of a 6x6 with a computer controlled automatic trans. That thing had 3 different computer systems on it and they all had to jive with each other to even drive down the road. To explain how poorly the slush box (didn't) work. It couldn't even climb over a 10" curb. Because when you bumped against the curb, it stopped. And when you pressed the throttle pedal down, the trans computer would not let the torque converter spin up because the engine computer did not jive with why its not moving. So the 11 Litre, 6 cylinder M/Benz TD would not spool up and just stay in limp mode.
But it did have a really nice heater/AC unit and stereo system.
If it had a 13 speed manual with the double low transfer case like the 5300 did, there would be no stopping it.

Sounds about right , replace two pieces of equipment with 10 and still lose post hole capabilities . What seems crazy to me is the cost , a used 972 with 10000 hrs still costs 160,000.00. Other than having your eggs in one basket and possibly dealing with German reliability I wonder what a new fully equipped Unimog would cost ?
 
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