Is the Jeep Wrangler TJ Mars ready?

Is Jeep Wrangler TJ capable to drive on Mars overlands. NASA ‚Ěď

  • Yes

    Votes: 13 72.2%
  • No

    Votes: 6 33.3%

  • Total voters
    18

ShaveLazer

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Jan 16, 2021
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Location
Tennessee
I think the atmosphere wouldn't have enough O2 to get it going. There's a reason rovers are electric besides the recharging ability. Also I believe the rocks and soil are somewhat coarse and might eat through rubber pretty fast. So if it was electric and had special NASA tires then maybe.
 
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Nightmare9

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May 22, 2020
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442
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I assume weight would be an issue even if they swapped out for some solar electric motor.

The Lunar Roving Vehicle had a mass of 210 kg and was designed to hold a payload of an additional 490 kg on the lunar surface. The frame was 3.1 meters long with a wheelbase of 2.3 meters.
 
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MountaineerTom

LJ Enthusiast, Retired USAF Weapons Loader
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Sep 25, 2018
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Sumter, SC
It‚Äės quite possible that it is.

F9CC42C5-330A-4A7E-9827-682E45645517.jpeg
 

glowell222

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Northern VA
I think the real issue would be the very low atmospheric pressure, causing most liquids to boil off-steering and braking immediately impacted. Lubrication, seals, and gaskets would be the first serious problem (after converting to electric power) followed closely by the extreme temperature swings. Stereo performance would be heinous without some type of shielding, and paint and fender flares would really suffer from UV damage, not to mention interior materials. Low gravity means recovery would be interesting, suspension springs and damping would need a serious re-think so you don't just bounce all the time like a ball, four mini-tracks would be much better than current tire choices, or solid, extremely wide rubber tires might be better, depending on terrain.

A fun few minutes of engineer-y thinking. Back to work.
 
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pixologics

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Jan 26, 2021
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64
Location
CA
I think the real issue would be the very low atmospheric pressure, causing most liquids to boil off-steering and braking immediately impacted. Lubrication, seals, and gaskets would be the first serious problem (after converting to electric power) followed closely by the extreme temperature swings. Stereo performance would be heinous without some type of shielding, and paint and fender flares would really suffer from UV damage, not to mention interior materials. Low gravity means recovery would be interesting, suspension springs and damping would need a serious re-think so you don't just bounce all the time like a ball, four mini-tracks would be much better than current tire choices, or solid, extremely wide rubber tires might be better, depending on terrain.

A fun few minutes of engineer-y thinking. Back to work.
Ahh we need stereo on Mars as well!! Great observations, I never thought so much. Thanks for sharing your views.