Looking for opinions on this home inspection report

Chris

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taylormade73

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Tile Roof:
Let me preface by saying that there are limited photos of the roof and I was not onsite, so my comments are limited to the photos taken by the inspector and should not be used to determine overall roof condition. With that said, there are several indications that the workmanship is substandard such as the following:
1. sloppy tile cuts around flashing. Zoom in behind the flue pipe.
photo (5).jpg

2. too much offset of roof penetrations through sheathing access holes,
photo~2.jpg

3. use of mortar at joints and hip transitions rather than terminals
photoedit~2.jpg

photo (6)~2.jpg


Should be this to make sure that the ridge to hip transition tiles are fully fastened and sealed.
Screenshot_20200114-035831.png


4. Too tight valley with no mortar closing/sealing off tile ends
photo (7).jpg

5. Soil stack detached at roof top.
photo (1)~3.jpg

Flat Roof:
photo (4)~2.jpg

1. Simply speaking, this bubbling referred to in the inspection report is actually blistering which is an indication of overheating. My suspicion is that area of modified bitumen is not sloped properly causing "ponding" as indicated by the stains and this standing water is absorbing more heat from the sun, which in turn causes the blistering. This is typically not a sign of water intrusion; however, mod bit/roll roofing is not made to withstand ponding, especially for any length of time. Most flat roof membrane manufacturers like Carlisle and Firestone void a warranty if ponding persists past 48 hours. The things to check on a flat roof are cracking/alligatoring of the membrane, vertical and horizontal seams, roof to wall transitions and flashing, and perimeter termination, which are all points os possible water intrusion.

While these are workmanship issues that indicate quality, or lack thereof, issues, they may or may not ever actively leak. I would have a professional roofer do an inspection to check on these issues and others that I cannot see from photos. I am primarily a retail residential and commercial roofing estimator here in Dayton. However, I do prepurchase roof inspections as favors for realtor that trust me following many home inspections. I ALWAYS recommend home purchasers get individual inspections for roofing, electrical, HVAC, and plumbing in addition to a whole house inspection. This way experts in the areas that carry the greatest future expense in the event of a failure/breakdown can provide a better idea of the condition of those items, potentially identifying issues up front, subsequently helping your purchase up front and maintenance cost down the road.

Hope this helps some. Best of luck.

photo~2.jpg
 
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acct21

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The issues I can see in the inspection report suggest complete and total lack of maintenance of any of the pool equipment. The fact that the core of the filtration system -- the sand filter -- doesn't have a working pressure gauge suggests the P.O. hasn't been too concerned about backwashing the filter (maybe they're doing it on a set schedule, which isn't actually the best thing for the filter or the pool). The missing/broken valve handles might be the reason why they didn't bother.

Those Paramount in-ground cleaners were great when they were new, but years of chlorine makes the plastic in them brittle, and replacing them nothing short of beastly -- each one of those pressure-cooker looking 'pots' is a valve, with 6 PVC return pipes (and one inlet pipe -- 7 total!) going straight into the ground. The valves are around $400 each, and labor... well, you don't want to know... on a new build a 2 valve system would run between $9-12k.

I'm frankly surprised the pool isn't the color of pea soup -- though with enough tri-chlor, muriatic acid, and copper-based algaecide you can make just about any standing body of water look blue.

Cracks in the pool are really concerning -- particularly when taken in context of other areas of cracking (fence, deck, concrete) noted in the report. You absolutely need an electronic leak test to know there is no leak in the pool liner.

With all of the features -- meaning more pumps, more controls -- if you're looking to bring this up to 2020 functionality (and repair all of the broken and neglected equipment)... you might get away with straight replacement for low mileage, 2004 Sahara money. To automate it (which will likely require a new control panel, and/or subpanel) you are looking at roughly one-owner, 2005 LJ Rubicon Sahara with 15,000 documented miles, climate-controlled storage, driven every weekend since new -- money.

That's assuming there are no leaks -- which can run the spectrum from replacing a cracked pipe, all the way up to draining and complete rebuild.
 
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Chris

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Damn guys, thanks for the responses. This is really good info.

I think that I am going to retract my offer on this house, which we have until Saturday to do so. The amount of work needed to fix the roof, the pool, and the water heater alone are probably in excess of 50k I suspect, and that’s just not something I want to mess with. There are plenty of houses, and even though we really loved the look of this one, it’s obvious the owner didn’t take care of it whatsoever.
 

taylormade73

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I looks like they may have an aluminized silver coat on the mod bit as well. If not properly prepped before application, then this may bubble up in a ponding area. I cannot tell from the photos you have though.
 

taylormade73

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Damn guys, thanks for the responses. This is really good info.

I think that I am going to retract my offer on this house, which we have until Saturday to do so. The amount of work needed to fix the roof, the pool, and the water heater alone are probably in excess of 50k I suspect, and that’s just not something I want to mess with. There are plenty of houses, and even though we really loved the look of this one, it’s obvious the owner didn’t take care of it whatsoever.
I would have professionals inspect onsite and provide repair/replace estimates for all serious items. This will give you a more realistic idea of existing condition and repair costs than simply we providing opinions based on photos from afar--regardless of our experience and credibility. If this is a property you really want, then use the repair estimates as a negotiating tool on the purchase price.
 
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Chris

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I would have professionals inspect onsite and provide repair/replace estimates for all serious items. This will give you a more realistic idea of existing condition and repair costs than simply we providing opinions based on photos from afar--regardless of our experience and credibility. If this is a property you really want, then use the repair estimates as a negotiating tool on the purchase price.
This had crossed my mind. However, with the cost of repairing everything, my guess is that it’s going to be 40k or more, and my gut tells me this seller isn’t going to come down that far on his price.

I’m going to talk with our realtor today and see what she says. I like the house, but there are so many others like it, so it’s not like we couldn’t easily find another.

I would probably have to pay a pool expert to come out, a roofer, a plumber, and an HVAC guy.
 
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Chris

Chris

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I don't mind maintaining a pool that's been properly maintained, but from what I can tell from this inspection report, the pool has never been maintained at all, which is a big red flag. I'd obviously have to have an expert tell me what it would cost to get it where it needs to be, but I'm guessing 20k isn't that far off.

So with our offer of 333k, unless this seller wants to come down to maybe 275k, I just don't see this deal happening. We really liked the house, but there are many others out there just like it, and in addition, the amount of repair work likely needed is probably 40-50k.

I'm no expert, but having had you guys look at this as well as a few other family members of mine who are in the construction industry, everyone seems to unanimously agree that a lot of work is needed.
 

DaveC

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The roof I can't speak to.

The windows are likely losing the seal between the panes as noted. This happens eventually to most every tract home in AZ, including mine, which was built a couple of years before this one, so this one is 'right on schedule'. If, in fact, the seals are bad, condensation will form inside the window (on the inner surfaces where the panes face each other) during monsoon season when the humidity spikes, and it obviously can't be cleaned. It's an annoyance, but livable depending on whether it's happened to windows that are highly visible or 'out of sight, out of mind'.

I'd be concerned about the pool.
1. Cracks in the pool itself could mean leaks. The pool surface looks like Pebble Tech, which is typically applied
over plaster. If it's just the Pebble Tech coating, it may not point to leaks. Pool surfaces have a 10-20 year life
expectancy around here depending on the surface material in terms of when they need to be resurfaced. I'm
guessing that's the original material, so it's probably due for a resurfacing. $6-$12k depending on size of the
pool and the material options you choose.

2. Inoperable or missing pop-up cleaning heads aren't cheap. I have one of those systems in my pool. The heads
on mine are about $70 each and there are 16 of them. I probably replace one per year. I'd suggest requesting
they replace all the heads with new ones. My pool guy gets the heads and just charges me his cost (around $50)
and then we'll change them out, which is fairly easy to do. The gears in the motor that drives them have to be
replaced every 2-3 years, but they're actually fairly inexpensive (I think around $35 for the set). $1,500 - $2,000
before anything related to the pipes.

3. The filter itself is probably the original, and likely due to be replaced. That part alone is close to $1k. The pump
motor can be rebuilt (I have the same one and had it rebuilt pretty inexpensively, but it depends on how bad
of shape it's in. I'd ask for a new filter and pump motor; probably in the $4k range to have a pool professional
come in and replace/install new ones.

3. Cracks/peeling of the cool deck is to be expected for a home that age here in AZ. As long as the deck isn't
structurally compromised near the pool, it can be a simple, relatively inexpensive or pricey fix depending on the
aesthetics you're after (i.e.; patch/fill in the peeling spots and just paint the deck vs. grind the current texture off
and re coat). Bottom line, if not compromising the edge of the pool, just depends on how long you
want to live with it looking that way before pulling the trigger. $200 to patch and paint doing the work yourself;
$3k - $6k to grind and resurface depending on how large the area is (I'd pay a pro for this).
 

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Anything that's a safety hazard is non-negotiable and usually has to be fixed by the seller, but not always if it's minor and you really want the house. Everything is negotiable based on how much, if any, the seller is contributing towards closing cost which is normal now in most areas, I believe. A lot depends on the asking and selling price too, a lot of factors come into play on where you sit in the deal monetarily. Remember, the seller wants to sell and is locked in the contract at this point, but buyer has the upper hand and can walk away anytime there is a problem. This is where a great real estate agent comes into play and earns their money.
 

acct21

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Sorry you guys are going through this. We bought a house that was built in 1977 (pool built in 1980). It was a lot of work understanding short/medium/long term repairs that were necessary, and factoring those into our negotiation. Even with all the major projects it was worth it -- and we'd do it all over again.
 
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JEEPCJTJ

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The windows are likely losing the seal between the panes as noted. This happens eventually to most every tract home in AZ, including mine, which was built a couple of years before this one, so this one is 'right on schedule'. If, in fact, the seals are bad, condensation will form inside the window (on the inner surfaces where the panes face each other) during monsoon season when the humidity spikes, and it obviously can't be cleaned. It's an annoyance, but livable depending on whether it's happened to windows that are highly visible or 'out of sight, out of mind'.
Just some more window info for anyone with future IGU (Insulated Glass Unit) issues. Every IGU will fog up eventually. It starts out reducing the insulation factor and the longer it is there, the less the insulation exists. Some brands have warranties of a few years, some don't, and either way some will last decades. The best window brand, from my glass replacement experience is Anderson. Their IGUs last the longest and every one can be replaced. Pella windows are also one of the best but IGU replacement will cost more either due to the extra work needed by anyone or Pella replacing the whole pane, frame and glass, which isn't necessarily the whole window. An IGU replacement is usually considerably cheaper than a whole window replacement unless you're looking to "save money today" and get the cheapest replacement window you can find. You will probably end up spending a little more than that "saved money" within a decade.

Many, maybe most, IGUs, especially the last 10 to 20 years have some sort of UV protection. If they get foggy it permanently messes up that inside coating which makes them look terrible 24/7 and stops any UV protection that was there even when the condensation disappears. Yes the UV IGU replacements cost a little more but they're worth it. I never had the UV protection in my windows that were installed 20 years ago (before I got any glass experience) and most need replaced. As I'm replacing them I am going with UV protection.
 
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Chris

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So it sounds like the window issue is normal for windows that are 15 years old, as well as some of the other things like stress cracks, etc.

The areas I am concerned the most about are the water heater, the pool, and the roof. I spoke with my realtor today and she said she is going to have some people she knows in these industries come out and give us some free estimates on what it would cost to repair everything. Since it's a free estimate, I have nothing to lose.

I will then potentially use those repairs to negotiate with the seller. I have a feeling we're talking about 30k worth of repairs here (things add up fast), in which case I doubt he's going to go down on the house price 30k. If he doesn't, I'll move on and find another house (we've already found a number of them we like).

30k is obviously just a really spitball type of guess, but I'm just trying to think big, as home repair projects are seldom ever cheap.
 

acct21

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With cracks visible IN the pool, can't stress enough the need for electronic leak detection. Somebody can come quote you a price to replace all the above-ground plumbing, but if there is a crack in the liner of the pool, that could easily double anything they quote from a walk through.
 
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Chris

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With cracks visible IN the pool, can't stress enough the need for electronic leak detection. Somebody can come quote you a price to replace all the above-ground plumbing, but if there is a crack in the liner of the pool, that could easily double anything they quote from a walk through.
Yeah, I don't disagree with that at all. I'm not even familiar with electronic leak detection or how that works, but it's obvious that I'm likely in for way more than I bargained for here.

Every gut instinct I have is telling me to avoid this house, even with as much as I want to like it. It's a bummer, but oh well!
 

Tomcat

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Yeah, I don't disagree with that at all. I'm not even familiar with electronic leak detection or how that works, but it's obvious that I'm likely in for way more than I bargained for here.

Every gut instinct I have is telling me to avoid this house, even with as much as I want to like it. It's a bummer, but oh well!
Always go with your gut.
 

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If you like the house I would proceed with getting a professional in there and getting a quote to fix some of the major issues and presenting it to the agent/owners and have them get it repaired or drop price...your inspector did a fine job!.. use it to your advantage... if they won’t, I’m sure there will be another low mileage, all stock Rubicon come your way😉
P.s. I didn’t read entire report, hell I didn’t read all of mine either.... so there may be something I missed..
 
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steelhd

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I spoke with my realtor today and she said she is going to have some people she knows in these industries come out and give us some free estimates on what it would cost to repair everything. Since it's a free estimate, I have nothing to lose.
Yes you do. Real estate agents exist for one reason and that's to earn a commission. They say all sorts of shit about caring, serving, helping but it's all about earning. No more no less. Every hour she spends on you is time spent not working with someone else and time not cashing a check So, point is, be very skeptical of "free estimates" from "people she knows". They are her people, not yours, and she wants a deal to close sooner than later.
 

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Yes you do. Real estate agents exist for one reason and that's to earn a commission. They say all sorts of shit about caring, serving, helping but it's all about earning. No more no less. Every hour she spends on you is time spent not working with someone else and time not cashing a check So, point is, be very skeptical of "free estimates" from "people she knows". They are her people, not yours, and she wants a deal to close sooner than later.
Wouldn’t you say they are eerily similar to say a.....car salesman?? Lol
 
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