Make your Rough Country track bar better

AndyG

Because some other guys are perverts
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My lifted 03 Rubicon on beadlocks with 33" tires has a Rough Country Adjustable front track bar , which has a big bend , clears well , and is known as a good value .

Recently I hit a series of bumps and death wobble started .

When you have death wobble from hitting a series of holes , that indicates loose components , I call that passive death wobble (DWWTH -death wobble waiting to happen), as there is no constant cause ,such as a low or unbalanced tire . Nothing happens normally , but the slop is there to allow it when it does take a lick, then it gets a life of it's own from inertia.

A Rough Country track bar is designed around stock track bushings, and don’t seem to last . They take a 12 mm bolt at the frame and a 10 mm at the axle if I’m correct .

I put in Energy suspension replacement urethane bushings, but they both only came in 12 mm or so diameter , so I drilled out the axle mount to 15/32 , and slapped in a grade 8 12mm flange bolt and lock nut with red loctite added and torqued it down .

Test drove it , and I could tell on the highway it was really good ...very stable at speed , point and shoot , and hit the same choppy spot on these fine Alabama backroads , and no deathwobble at all , almost had to ask myself if it was the same spot . Floated over it .

So , a 12 mm bolt and Energy Suspension bushings is something to consider if you have that track bar and plan to continue to run it .
 
Any part number on the bushings?
No... It's just a two-part bushing made to fit a stock track bar. . I jumped at the box and they were black and not red.

They are easy to put in vs a stock bushing that needs to be pressed in
 
Dave at JeepWest uses the forged RC track bar in the majority of his builds - and he swaps the bushings out for OEM JK track bar bushings which have a bolt size of 14mm. The part number is moog 7252.
 
Dave at JeepWest uses the forged RC track bar in the majority of his builds - and he swaps the bushings out for OEM JK track bar bushings which have a bolt size of 14mm. The part number is moog 7252.
Now that would be stout... A j k has a pretty sturdy looking linkage system... Look closer to a half ton truck the last time I was under one.
 
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Now that would be stout... A j k has a pretty sturdy looking linkage system... Look closer to a half ton truck the last time I was under one.
Right on the money, it’s actually the exact same bushing for ram 3500 trucks! He has mentioned on the forums that the bushing in RC track bars are the only thing bad about them, and he swaps the bushing for the moog on both sides before installing brand new. I’m putting the same bushing in my Currie bar as the poly that comes with it isn’t providing enough deflection for my use as my brackets are not aligned correctly.
 
I'm sure there's a limit to how rigid a track bar needs to be... But I know soft bushings make for terrible handling. In my mind the stouter bushings would go right along with bigger tires great .

If I have any more drama I'm going to do what you just suggested... It seems that would make a rough country track bar pretty much the ultimate .

Good job.
 
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The poly bushing is great and tightens things up a lot. Currie sees the benefit and includes it in their big bolt track bar. I like the moog because I need the misalignment, it’s proven strong, and I can grab one at any autozone or o’reilly. For background my bracket isn’t lined up very well in the front side to axle position, and I started to stress/tear on the bracket as the poly would only give a little side to side. If your axle is set up correctly with alignment it should be great. Looking forward to hearing the long term review.
 
Here’s a picture of one of Dave’s setups. The owner cracked the frame side mount so they made a new one that still keeps the correct geometry.
BD08DEF7-9A21-4002-91A2-7123E0A41749.jpeg
 
The poly bushing is great and tightens things up a lot. Currie sees the benefit and includes it in their big bolt track bar. I like the moog because I need the misalignment, it’s proven strong, and I can grab one at any autozone or o’reilly. For background my bracket isn’t lined up very well in the front side to axle position, and I started to stress/tear on the bracket as the poly would only give a little side to side. If your axle is set up correctly with alignment it should be great. Looking forward to hearing the long term review.
Excellent I'm a little bit guilty of wanting the best of both worlds...

I wheel the Rubicon and I want decent flex and strength and at the same time I want it to drive fantastic.

I know that's asking a lot but I 've found it to be possible if you keep an eye on things.
 
Excellent I'm a little bit guilty of wanting the best of both worlds...

I wheel the Rubicon and I want decent flex and strength and at the same time I want it to drive fantastic.

I know that's asking a lot but I 've found it to be possible if you keep an eye on things.
I like that mentality, and I totally agree. To paraphrase what @jjvw has said, ‘if it’s comfortable and works well off road - there’s no reason it can’t be comfortable and perform great on the street’.
 
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Here’s a picture of one of Dave’s setups. The owner cracked the frame side mount so they made a new one that still keeps the correct geometry.View attachment 139777
You know rough country has a pretty nice frame mount ... if it didn't drop the track bar .

No one talks about this but I bet you could drop the track bar at the frame and keep a stock pitman arm and get pretty good performance... This is opposite of the dropped pitman arm scenario we hear all the time.

Of course this is just me talkin ... not educated... Mr. Blaine would know pretty quick what would happen in a situation like that.
 
You know rough country has a pretty nice frame mount ... if it didn't drop the track bar .

No one talks about this but I bet you could drop the track bar at the frame and keep a stock pitman arm and get pretty good performance... This is opposite of the dropped pitman arm scenario we hear all the time.

Of course this is just me talkin ... not educated... Mr. Blaine would know pretty quick what would happen in a situation like that.
Similar to the way that Dave sets his track bar bracket up - it’s easy to measure the amount of drop needed off the frame side to keep the angle happy. He does clarify that he makes no claim that double shear or aftermarket bracketing is stronger than oem, just a solution to cracking or another issue with the stock mount. Plus he claims that with his bracketry and RC track bar you can push the front forward 1.5” and still have stock up travel clearance. I trust him when he makes claims - because his Facebook page is filled with suspension cycling and trying to squeeze every bit of performance out of jeeps. Take a look at the photos section of his page - I enjoy seeing the updates every day. https://m.facebook.com/JeepWestServiceandMechanical/
 
I put in Energy suspension replacement urethane bushings, but they both only came in 12 mm or so diameter , so I drilled out the axle mount to 15/32 , and slapped in a grade 8 12mm flange bolt and lock nut with red Loctite.
Not important, but SAE grade 8 would be a 10 in metric. If that's what you wanted?
 
You know he should be really proud... I've been hearing nothing but good things about him for a long time... To have a reputation that is pretty much nationwide says a lot.
 
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Not important, but SAE grade 8 would be a 10 in metric. If that's what you wanted?
Man I would need to go back and look what I bought... We have a building supply company that's got a great selection in type, size and grade ... but I may have gotten out in left field on grade.
 
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You know he should be really proud... I've been hearing nothing but good things about him for a long time... To have a reputation that is pretty much nationwide says a lot.
It’s a hard to earn reputation. When I sent him questions about getting regearing done, he explained that although the doesn’t normally do revolution 5.38s - he will always ensure his work. And will spend as much time as it take for him to get happy with it, the pattern as perfect as he thinks it can be. He also explained to me that if the gears are cut or made in a way he can’t clean up to his standard, he’s gonna be honest with me and look into returning or exchanging them. It’s really too bad we have all the awesome builders/shop owners over here on the left coast ;)
 
It’s a hard to earn reputation. When I sent him questions about getting regearing done, he explained that although the doesn’t normally do revolution 5.38s - he will always ensure his work. And will spend as much time as it take for him to get happy with it, the pattern as perfect as he thinks it can be. He also explained to me that if the gears are cut or made in a way he can’t clean up to his standard, he’s gonna be honest with me and look into returning or exchanging them. It’s really too bad we have all the awesome builders/shop owners over here on the left coast ;)
I run a small construction business... We do light residential remodeling and have 12 employees and do about 1.3 million a year.

It only takes about 10 years to be an overnight success.

We won't do work that we're not confident will perform, we don't rely on the building code to ensure that things are good enough, and customers that are reasonable and fair to work with get a lifetime warranty . Customers that are buttholes get a pretty good warranty too.

I spent a lot of money over the years making things right but I haven't spent any money advertising.

This all reminds me of what my friend who did one of my work truck transmissions told me...

Andy you've got a lifetime warranty... If you bring it back complaining I'm going to kill you.