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Metal cutting tools: what's really the best option?

WSS

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When using the cut-off discs, be careful even after you have let go of the trigger. The good part is they do cotterize decntly so blood is usually not an issue.....

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mrblaine

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I have a corded sawzall. Is the upgrade to cordless worth it? I don't normally use it because it kinda sucks to use.

Currently on the short list is a jigsaw and another grinder. I still only have one. Old porter cable corded. Damn thing keeps kicking though. It's ground fiberglass, steel, ceramic tile, concrete, wood, cut miles of steel, and it works just like the day it was new.
There is actually no comparison between the M18 Fuel Sawzall and the corded Milwaukee versions. Like I said, I've given away several Milwaukee corded versions because they suck and I refuse to use something that annoying.

After a week of using the Fuel version, I bought another one just like it and threw it in a drawer just in case something happened to the first one. I'm not going to be without that saw.
 
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mrblaine

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My Hypertherm 105 (plasma) clocked 4.2hrs in a 10 day yesterday. It is a money maker for me. Monday I switch to oxy/fuel (lp) and my production drops to probably 1.8-2hrs of cut time over 10hrs. The pierce speed on 3/4" using Plaz is 1.5 seconds, oxy/fuel is 15 seconds per pierce. So, one inner and outer cut using oxy is 1/2 a minute per part compared to 3 seconds.

For my setup, 3/4" is where the trade off using plaz and oxy/fuel meet. The IPM's are almost the same but Oxy will give a better cut than plaz. Under 3/4" and plaz is a clear winner with quality and speed and post clean up time.

I get that plaz is not useful for everyone and the investment is steep but I sure like mine.
That is the equivalent of discussing the mileage you get out of semi-truck tires in a 31" All Terrain Jeep tire discussion.
 

Blackjack

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I have a corded sawzall. Is the upgrade to cordless worth it? I don't normally use it because it kinda sucks to use.

Currently on the short list is a jigsaw and another grinder. I still only have one. Old porter cable corded. Damn thing keeps kicking though. It's ground fiberglass, steel, ceramic tile, concrete, wood, cut miles of steel, and it works just like the day it was new.
I would get the cordless jigsaw and grinder and then the sawzall.
 
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mrblaine

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To clarify, my first post in this thread was to give a thumbs up on plasma cutting. Oxy/fuel was just a comparison. Sorry if you missed that, my bad.
You mentioned 4 hours of use, the average Jeep owner will never use a plasma for 4 hours on one vehicle over its lifetime of ownership. There simply isn't that much you can cut.
 

Mike_H

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I would get the grinder, Sawzall, and then the jigsaw. I can do almost everything with the grinder the other two do. I cannot do everything the grinder can do with the other two.
I'm thinking Grinder, jigsaw, then sawzall, just because my jig saw can be useful for woodworking too (25% of the shop is dedicated to that).

There must be an immense difference between the first battery powered Sawzall and the Fuel brushless versions. My dad has a first gen battery operated one and its no better than the corded version. Heavy, hard to handle and just not that useful for metal work. Demo'ing a house on the other hand...indispensable.
 

P man

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I am small potatoes compared to most but If I can't attach it to my 4.5" grinder I don't need it. I do have a Sawzall I use for cutting up frames and tubs for scrap but that is very rare
 
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PCO6

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Anybody ever use a drill attached nibbler? Just curios how they work. Youtube makes them look great.

My Brother has one and it works well. I have an old Sears electric nibbler and a straight cutting electric shear, both hand held. They are quick and leave a clean edge. They are of course for when you take the tool to the metal vs. the metal to the tool. This is distinction for almost all cutting tools. I get a lot of use out of my throatless shear when I'm making curved cuts in sheet metal for patch panels and similar things. It makes the same kind of cuts you can make with a nibbler. I also have a straight ahead shear that gives a nice cut.

Shear - Throatless  1 (425x640).jpg
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WSS

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My Brother has one and it works well. I have an old Sears electric nibbler and a straight cutting electric shear, both hand held. They are quick and leave a clean edge. They are of course for when you take the tool to the metal vs. the metal to the tool. This is distinction for almost all cutting tools. I get a lot of use out of my throatless shear when I'm making curved cuts in sheet metal for patch panels and similar things. It makes the same kind of cuts you can make with a nibbler. I also have a straight ahead shear that gives a nice cut.

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Nice tools!! Yes big distiction when the tool is portable/handheld. I’ve been gathering stuff like you have for when I retire.
 
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WSS

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You mentioned 4 hours of use, the average Jeep owner will never use a plasma for 4 hours on one vehicle over its lifetime of ownership. There simply isn't that much you can cut.
My TJ though has many, many hours of cut parts on it. Same for my personal truck. Lots of plasma used in my builds. I will confess to being lazy though. I always default to the easiest way.
 

Trevlaw

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My Brother has one and it works well. I have an old Sears electric nibbler and a straight cutting electric shear, both hand held. They are quick and leave a clean edge. They are of course for when you take the tool to the metal vs. the metal to the tool. This is distinction for almost all cutting tools. I get a lot of use out of my throatless shear when I'm making curved cuts in sheet metal for patch panels and similar things. It makes the same kind of cuts you can make with a nibbler. I also have a straight ahead shear that gives a nice cut.

View attachment 305535View attachment 305536
Ive got a B2 Beverly and it comes in handy quite a bit. Anything I can cut or punch without throwing dust or sharp shavings everywhere is a bonus for me.

Also have several roper Whitney hole punches, a few model 20's and even a rare model 40 that'll do 30 tons.

Haven't fixed it up yet, but also have an Edwards 5B alligator shear, it's rated to shear 1/2" plate, the handle is about 7 feet long lol

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mrblaine

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My TJ though has many, many hours of cut parts on it. Same for my personal truck. Lots of plasma used in my builds. I will confess to being lazy though. I always default to the easiest way.
Alright, you win, everyone does the same as you do and needs the same exact tools for the same exact reasons.
 

Blackjack

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I'm thinking Grinder, jigsaw, then sawzall, just because my jig saw can be useful for woodworking too (25% of the shop is dedicated to that).

There must be an immense difference between the first battery powered Sawzall and the Fuel brushless versions. My dad has a first gen battery operated one and its no better than the corded version. Heavy, hard to handle and just not that useful for metal work. Demo'ing a house on the other hand...indispensable.
I ended up with the jigsaw (and an oscillating tool) first because I have a corded grinder and sawzall that still work and had home and shop repairs to do as well.

Milwaukee has really stepped up their game recently with all their line and especially in the mechanics tools. More power, more compact and definitely a lot more in types of tools as well.
 
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