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Mounting a Jerry Can

Flivver250

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Jun 3, 2018
698
Dubai/Florida
As I go off road in the desert, running out of fuel would be a serious issue in many ways. I just got a mounting bracket and a Wavian jerry can. I am thinking about mounting it on the side of the Jeep, just in front of the driver's door. I also just ordered a nut setter, a tool which I have never used before. If I set four 3/8 nuts into the body metal, would those nuts hold the weight of the mount and a full can while you are bashing around? Guessing the total weight would be 50-55 pounds, I have my doubts. Any better ideas? We really do burn quite a lot of fuel out there so the can would not be ornamental.
 

superduty

TJ Enthusiast
Apr 7, 2016
259
So Cal
I personally wouldn't trust nutserts in the body for a full fuel can. It would likely work for a while, but my guess it would eventually work it's way out.

Somebody makes a mount that goes to the frame. Do some googling.

I think I may have seen it on expedition portal forum.

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Flivver250

Flivver250

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Jun 3, 2018
698
Dubai/Florida
I have also seen mounts that ride on the bumper mounted tire carrier, but that seems risky as well. I am not gentle on the pedals.
 

Jerry Bransford

TJ Guru
Supporting Member
Nov 9, 2015
10,958
Escondido California
The tub's sheet metal is not strong enough to support a full Jerry can, especially on bumpy desert roads. As someone who used to think the same way and wheels nearly exclusively in the SoCal deserts, and installed a rear twin Jerry can holder but later removed it, my suggestion is to simply make good fuel management decisions. There are plenty of gasoline sources within range of the most remote areas.
 
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Flivver250

Flivver250

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Jun 3, 2018
698
Dubai/Florida
I am thinking the same way. I'll probably get with a local welder and have something rugged fabricated on the bumper tire carrier.
 

rasband

LJR
Supporting Member
Sep 11, 2018
655
Denver, CO
I recently purchased some Jerry cans and have been searching for a mount location as well. I’d love to see them between the doors and front fenders, but non of the mounts out there seem “good enough” (either they destroy the tub, are 100% custom fab, or stick off the frame to get grabbed by rocks behind the front tires).

I’ve come to the conclusion that the options are:

1. Rear bumper with Jerry mounts (dirt worx looks phenomenal)
2. “Trunk” tie downs
3. Attachments to other bumpers + tire carriers (Rock something’s, some custom welds and u-bolts, etc)

I’m excited to see what you decide as I plan mine eventually (item 2 until then since when I need these I’ll be open top I believe).
 

astjp2

TJ Addict
Aug 22, 2018
2,079
Utah and Alaska
The tub's sheet metal is not strong enough to support a full Jerry can, especially on bumpy desert roads. As someone who used to think the same way and wheels nearly exclusively in the SoCal deserts, and installed a rear twin Jerry can holder but later removed it, my suggestion is to simply make good fuel management decisions. There are plenty of gasoline sources within range of the most remote areas.
Jerry, I have had one on the side of my jeeps for 30 years, just bolt it to the passenger fender. If you get hit on the driver side, Kaboom. I used fender washers and about 3/4" tubular spacers to clear the antenna. I use the Military blitz mounts and cans...

jeep.jpg
 
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Flivver250

Flivver250

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Jun 3, 2018
698
Dubai/Florida
I went to a shop that can do some custom fabrication that will work in conjunction with my rear bumper/tire carrier. He also could fabricate a mount coming from the frame to carry the weight of a can mounted in front of the door. Funny thing, he told me metal on the TJ body was tough and could hold the weight if bolted in, but a JK would not. As I drive more like "The Rat Patrol" than Morgan Freeman and Miss Daisy, Some 1/4 in bar stock makes sense.
 

astjp2

TJ Addict
Aug 22, 2018
2,079
Utah and Alaska
You may want to invest in the Blitz metal lock strap, keeps the siphoners away if you stick with the blitz cans. Also they need to have good gaskets or they stink if they seep fuel. I know because I have that problem a lot.
 

superduty

TJ Enthusiast
Apr 7, 2016
259
So Cal
I don't want to get in a big debate over Jerry cans, but if you want the best I would recommend Scepter military fuel cans, commonly referred to as MFCs. Not the same as the scepter cans sold at Costco.

They are difficult to find in the USA, easy to find in Canada (where they are made).

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DHunt

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Jun 12, 2018
224
Harbison Canyon
Are the Scepter cans metal or plastic?
Would mounting inside the Jeep on the rear wheel wells be considered a good location? There are already 3 nutserts in place, including the lower seat belt tie down. I think I could get a good solid mount there.
 

superduty

TJ Enthusiast
Apr 7, 2016
259
So Cal
They are plastic and actually seal well enough with a non worn out gasket to put in the cab

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luk4mud

TJ Enthusiast
Sep 23, 2018
139
Pasadena, CA
Maybe Jerry can fuel manage around a 19 gallon tank, but I have not found a way to do that. At (conservatively) 10 mpg in 4wd, a 190 mile range is ok for a day trip, but doesnt work in places like Death Valley and the vast stretches of Utah where I often go. And it seems like the "usable" portion of the tank is more like 16 gallons rather than 19, further reducing range.

So, extra fuel is needed for many of us. It seems that by process of elimination, the rear is the logical place to locate cans. But I hate weight. Carrying fuel in the rear means a heavier bumper/ tire carrier plus the cans and fuel weight. A new quality bumper/ carrier = cans is going to set me back $1200, maybe more. Plus, for those of us who are solidly into middle age, hoisting around the 5 gallon cans is getting harder.



So, another option is a larger main tank. The GenRight is far from cheap (I snagged on for $2200 I think), but 31 gallons of "usable" fuel protected by a skid and sitting lower in the rear was a very appealing alternative at least to me. 300 mile range, no cans to fuss with, maintain lighter bumper/ carrier, cost of the GenRight was $1000 above what I was going to pay for a new bumper/ carrier + cans. Also the GenRight sits slightly higher than the stock tank.