New Colorado (Colofornia) Emissions Woes

Jablinski

Mud as Clear
Original poster
Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
186
Location
Colorado
I'm having some difficulty locating the drive cycle recommendations for resolving "Catalyst Incomplete". @mrblaine previously posted a link to the Chrysler specific junk but that link is now 404. I wish I saved it.
My registration is absolutely due on 28th of February (30 days grace included)

I want to say it is this:
1) Warm engine at idle until it's in closed loop
2) Drive @ 30-45mph and @ 1300-2000rpm for ?? minutes
3) Repeat 20+ times, resulting in a big FU each time from the OBD:ROFLMAO:

My specific issue with the new rules (which seem to be transposed directly from the california CARB website) is that they are refusing to put my jeep on the dynamometer (to test the ACTUAL emissions) without ALL of the the ERM's in the "ready" state. This is a problem for me. I have only ever had 2/3 monitors ready during past tests.
SOOOO...can I force that loop?
Is this indicative of a bad sensor or cat?

I replaced the cat myself 4yrs ago with a cheepo $120 (federal standard) universal magnaflow to pass emissions and the difference was impressive. Apparently longevity is the issue with the fed cats vs CARB though
Do I throw $600 in parts for a CARB cat at this or drive to Cheyenne and risk a (phenomenal...read $47,000/day) fine or just fuckin move to Santa Fe and start a new life?
The O2's are all around 6yrs old, probably 35K miles and NKG (Amazon)

This is a catch-22 fubard situation IMO. Guessing ill have to "get professional help" from a state sponsored garage?????????????/:poop:

Please advise
 
Your 98 should have laxer rules to begin with. My 97 in California does.

Go on a 100 mile road trip? I've never done a specific drive to get mine ready. I just go on a long drive where I don't have to stop and go a lot
 
Your 98 should have laxer rules to begin with. My 97 in California does.

Go on a 100 mile road trip? I've never done a specific drive to get mine ready. I just go on a long drive where I don't have to stop and go a lot
3 tanks of aimless driving at specific speeds:poop:
 
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You don't have to move to Santa Fe. Just move a little farther from Denver. Most of the state (area, not population) doesn't have to deal with this nonsense.
 
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Three tanks in the name of cleaner air and the environment🤪
Looking at a cart now for mine. I know it’s registered as a federal vehicle so I’m thinking I can get away with a standard cart
Yep. I am a big fan of lowered pollutants. Really! It felt a bit ridiculous running down 3 tanks of gas chasing a computer reading that will allow me to take a dyno test that will ultimately show that I have a very emissions compliant vehicle. I'm not even close to done with this either...so maybe 10+ tanks?
 
Move to Florida. Anything goes there. 🤫
Florida1.jpg
 
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Not vehicle specific but I found this info from NY

OBD II Readiness Monitors​


OBD Drive Cycles​


Universal Drive Cycle​

In order for the PCM to properly execute all the readiness monitors on a particular vehicle, an OBD II drive cycle needs to be driven to achieve the enabling conditions for each monitor. The correct drive cycle for your vehicle can vary greatly depending on the vehicle’s year, make, model and manufacturer. The type of monitor you are trying to execute can also dictate the type of driving you need to perform.

Vehicle specific drive cycle information can be found in the manufacturer’s service information, aftermarket service information, various websites and may also be included in the vehicle owner’s manual. Typically, a few days of normal driving, both city and highway, will make the monitors ready. The following generic drive cycle can be used as a guideline if a specific drive cycle is not known. It will assist with resetting monitors when a car specific drive cycle is not available. However, it may not work for all vehicles and readiness monitors.

  • The universal OBD-II drive cycle begins with a cold start (coolant temperature below 122 F, and the coolant and air
    temperature sensors within 11 degrees of one another). This condition is easily achieved by letting the car sit overnight.
  • The ignition key must not be left on prior to the cold start. Otherwise the heated oxygen sensor diagnostic may not run.
  • Start the engine and idle the engine in drive for two and half minutes, with the A/C and rear defroster on if equipped.
  • Turn the A/C and rear defroster off, and accelerate to 55 mph under moderate, constant acceleration. Hold at a steady
    speed for three minutes.
  • Decelerate (coast down) to 20 mph without braking or depressing the clutch for manual transmissions.
  • Accelerate back to 55-60 mph at 3/4 throttle. Hold at a steady speed for five minutes.
  • Decelerate (coast down) to a stop without braking.
 
You don't have to move to Santa Fe. Just move a little farther from Denver. Most of the state (area, not population) doesn't have to deal with this nonsense.

The ones that are willing to risk the fines don't have to deal, I guess. This rule and all it's changes are statewide and put a serious crimp in the exhaust repair business. I've told more than one customer to go visit relatives in other states, find a good shop and get their cat-work done.

Unless you're referring specifically to emissions testing... That's Denver only (for now).
 
Unless you're referring specifically to emissions testing... That's Denver only (for now).

this. If you don't have to do testing then you don't have to go driving around trying to get your drive cycles to complete.

But for that matter, if you're in an area that doesn't do emissions, how is this law remotely enforceable against the guy doing the work himself?

1. What situation would result in a vehicle getting looked at in a non-emissions county? Is local law enforcement getting funded to run around getting warrants and establishing probable cause to crawl under random vehicles? Or just the old ones that look poorly maintained?
2. Even if it got inspected, it's just like the standard capacity magazine ban...if the product isn't date-stamped and you don't have any documentation, then the cat was on the vehicle before 2021. They gonna go subpoena your financial records to find out when you bought it?

If the way to stay legal or the punishment for not doing so is just money, then it's only a law for the poor. And the more expensive you make it to keep a vehicle going so people can get to work and put dinner on the table, the more creative those people will get to find a way around it. As usual, it's short sighted feel-good lefty bullshit from the likes of princess Polis.
 
Is this the one you're looking for? It has the All Monitor Drive Trace, and then each of the simpler individual ones including the Catalyst Monitor Drive Trace.
 

Attachments

Have you been to an Air Care Facility and they are refusing to put it on the dynamometer?

From my 98 manual...

catalyst monitor.png
catalyst monitor2.png
Catalyst monitor3.png
Catalyst monitor4.png
Catalyst monitor5.png



What stands out to me:
It can take up to 2 Failures in a row to turn on the
MIL. After the MIL is ON, it takes 3 Good Trips to
turn the MIL OFF. After the MIL is OFF, the PCM
will self-erase the DTC after 40 Warm-up cycles
. A
Warm-up cycle is counted when the ECT (Engine
Coolant Temperature Sensor) has crossed 160°F and
has risen by at least 40°F
since the engine has been
started.
 
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Is this the one you're looking for? It has the All Monitor Drive Trace, and then each of the simpler individual ones including the Catalyst Monitor Drive Trace.
Yep. That's the one. Thank you
Screenshot_20220217-101344_Acrobat for Samsung.jpg

I see a couple things I'm going to try differently this time. One has to do with being aware of my fuel level