Pure Electric F-Series

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billiebob

billiebob

TJ Addict
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Oct 31, 2015
3,564
Kootenays, BC, Canada
That was a big issue during the cold snap in the midwest I believe. All the Teslas wouldn't start!
Hell half the cars would not start either. My TJ gets about 12mpg at 40 below. And it won't start unless it is plugged in. Doom and gloom. But in reality there is little difference between gas and electric. But every day the electric concept improves.

Heres a product being tested by Parks Canada, an electric snowmobile. It out performs the gas sleds.

https://taigamotors.ca
 
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billiebob

billiebob

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Oct 31, 2015
3,564
Kootenays, BC, Canada
I doubt we will be able to buy one on roll out. The first customers will likely be municipalities and utility companies with predictable schedules. But no doubt, pure electric will become common.
 

danof76

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Nov 21, 2018
319
San Antonio, TX
I'd be surprised to see many of those down here, and we're known for driving a ton of trucks. I mean, what's the point in a truck you have to charge for hours after just a drive over to Houston?

Sure, if electric cars could run for days on end I wouldn't have a thing against them, but Texas is a big state, a handful of hours of driving before needing hours of recharge just doesn't work.

I'll stick with my Eco Boost for now.
Ditto, I love my EcoBoost. As it is I own my two favorite vehicles I've ever owned, and I don't see either of them changing anytime soon (unless I manage to find myself into a King Ranch F150).
 
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DHunt

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Jun 12, 2018
216
Harbison Canyon
I know there's some smart guys on here, so maybe here's a chance for me to learn something. My understanding of any battery is that they basically work by destroying themselves. Ions leave one plate and transfer to the other plate eating away at the losing side. Any battery will be less effective as time goes on. If it got 100 miles on a charge new, it will get fewer than 100 miles 5 years later. How much less is the problem. It doesn't seem practical to me to have a vehicle that you don't know what it's range is. Then you throw in variables like temperature and you're really gambling. If I could only afford one car, I can't see it being electric any time soon. Seems like a backup or toy. Like my TJ.
 
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billiebob

billiebob

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Oct 31, 2015
3,564
Kootenays, BC, Canada
Everything you just said, also applies to the gas engine. Temperature, ie 40 below affects my TJs mileage too. I'm on my second motor, I got 11 years out of the first. The 100 mile range is way below what is possible today. I've met several Tesla owners, they love 'em.

100 years ago the debate was gas, steam, electric. Mack trucks started building electric
trucks. Until Henry Ford and Texas Crude, electricity was on an equal footing. Today electric vehicles are inevitable. Range was a huge issue 100 years ago too when the horse was the alternative.

Here is the 1920? Walker Commercial Electric Truck

76345
 
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TJ4Jim

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Dec 9, 2015
1,270
Brookings, Oregon
Everything you just said, also applies to the gas engine. Temperature, ie 40 below affects my TJs mileage too. I'm on my second motor, I got 11 years out of the first. The 100 mile range is way below what is possible today. I've met several Tesla owners, they love 'em.

100 years ago the debate was gas, steam, electric. Mack trucks started building electric
trucks. Until Henry Ford and Texas Crude, electricity was on an equal footing. Today electric vehicles are inevitable. Range was a huge issue 100 years ago too when the horse was the alternative.

Here is the 1920? Walker Commercial Electric Truck

View attachment 76345
They still make great chocolate chip cookies.
 
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DHunt

TJ Enthusiast
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Jun 12, 2018
216
Harbison Canyon
My understanding about Tesla is that the battery is custom. Quite a problem if Tesla folds and your battery needs replacing. Not as easy to manufacture an after market battery as say a bumper. The debate between gas, electric and steam was a debate for standardization, which was accomplished. Tesla's battery has no interchangeability, so no standardization. What the electric car industry needs is a new magic battery. Until one is developed, I don't think internal combustion verses electric is much of a fight without government intervention for electric. Sad state of affairs when a guy making 30k has to kick in for a 150k$ car.
 
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billiebob

billiebob

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Oct 31, 2015
3,564
Kootenays, BC, Canada
Proud to be Canadian as Canadas Corvis supplies the biggest marine battery pack ever for a European hybrid cruise ship. Norway has a policy to ban fossil fueled engines in their fiords so the only way a cruise ship can enter is with electric motors and massive batteries, made in Canada.


79755
 

Allstar424

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Feb 15, 2019
107
Central Point, OR
I think the idea of an all electric f-150 is pretty neat. If you're an electrician or similar trade and just need to haul yourself and your tools plus a few ladders across town this would be a great option. I'm sure the price will be hefty but having all that instant torque on tap would be perfect for the normal load requirements of a pickup. The technology certainly has a ways to go but it will be interesting to see if local fleets buy into the electric idea. Maintenance would be simpler, but if you have to replace batteries often (every so many years) that would grenade the whole cost saving angle.

Now if you're pulling large trailers daily this would not be the truck for you...
 
Where does the electricity and the battery materials come from . . . . ?
If it is hydro electric dams, coal fired turbines, etc. . . . do you think that coal, dam, mine, etc were built with diesel burning machinery.
Betting the electric vehicles with their aluminum bodies have put a larger load on resources than that gas-pot truck you drive.
Yuppie - shit.
Solar powered earth movers, solar powered freight trains . . . .
 
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billiebob

billiebob

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Oct 31, 2015
3,564
Kootenays, BC, Canada
Where does the electricity and the battery materials come from . . . . ?
If it is hydro electric dams, coal fired turbines, etc. . . . do you think that coal, dam, mine, etc were built with diesel burning machinery.
Betting the electric vehicles with their aluminum bodies have put a larger load on resources than that gas-pot truck you drive.
Yuppie - shit.
Solar powered earth movers, solar powered freight trains . . . .
I think dams and oil sands both use traditional fossil fuels to generate energy.
BUT there is a mine which moves material with electric dump trucks. They come down the mountain using the electric motor to hold the truck back and use the generated electricity to power the truck back up the mountain to reload.

Kinda cool when you free yer mind to look at the possibilities eh.
 
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LukesfirstJeep

TJ Enthusiast
Aug 2, 2018
240
Central PA
I think dams and oil sands both use traditional fossil fuels to generate energy.
BUT there is a mine which moves material with electric dump trucks. They come down the mountain using the electric motor to hold the truck back and use the generated electricity to power the truck back up the mountain to reload.

Kinda cool when you free yer mind to look at the possibilities eh.
I think there's an opportunity for electric vehicles in some applications, but living in a rural area where travel distances are farther, and there are few recharging stations is not one of them.

Short trips with a regular route is better suited to electric vehicles with current battery technology.

The PA turnpike (toll road) has a fee charging stations. The concept is nice, but in my mind, if your traveling across the state (300+) miles on a toll road, you want to save time. Stopping and waiting an hour to recharge your car to finish the trip is not saving time.
 
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billiebob

billiebob

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Oct 31, 2015
3,564
Kootenays, BC, Canada
Stopping and waiting an hour to recharge your car to finish the trip is not saving time.
Tesla is working on that. I think their Super Charger Stations give 80% in 15 minutes, and they are putting them in with Starbucks so you can plug in, buy a coffee, check mail, texts, twitter..... and drive. Since you cannot drive and text anymore.... and you cannot gas up with a cell in yer hand.... those making the jump are luvin' it.
 
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