Ring gear bolts

03sahara

TJ Enthusiast
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Apr 29, 2020
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Québec
I bought a lsd for my Dana 44 I installed my new ring gear and torqued to specs. Then I found a good deal on an e locker before finishing my gear change. My question Is can I reuse the ring gear bolts to swap it over to the new locker or do I have to get new bolts.

thanks,

Ethan
 
X2, clean them up and make sure to apply that red Loctite as recommended above by Lou. One of the biggest causes of damage to the gears is from ring gear bolts backing out because the installer forgot, or didn't know to apply, red Loctite on the bolt threads.
 
I'll be the odd one out here. Ring gear bolts should only be used once. You still have to apply red loctite even when they're new.

When seeing up gears, I never reuse them even if asked.
 
I'll be the odd one out here. Ring gear bolts should only be used once. You still have to apply red loctite even when they're new.

When seeing up gears, I never reuse them even if asked.

I have used old bolts many times without issue. I used one set of bolts on 3 different ring gears. The only reason I used new bolts on my Jeep is that they came in the install kit. What is the issue of re using bolts?
 
I have used old bolts many times without issue. I used one set of bolts on 3 different ring gears. The only reason I used new bolts on my Jeep is that they came in the install kit. What is the issue of re using bolts?

From what I was taught and from a little research, ring gear bolts stretch (however minute) when you torque them. Like a Stover nut on a pinion. Yes people will re-use them with loctite, and some have good success. I think Blaine puts it best when he makes the comment "it works until it doesn't". In this case, the ring gear bolts are out of sight in the diff where you can't "keep an eye on them".
 
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In a pinch you can reuse them on a Dana 44 but never reuse them on a Dana 35 as they are already prone to backing out on their own.
 
@hosejockey61 Do you still use the recommended torque (55 ft-lbs for dana 30) even using red loctite? or do you decrease by 20%?
Yes definitely reduce the ft-lbs when using Loctite or the bolt can be overtightened due to the reduced friction making it easier to get it tighter than it should be. The Loctite reduces actual the ft-lbs. needed to get to the correct tightness. As above reducing it the ft-lbs. by 20% is correct.
 
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Do whatever the manufacturer of the brand you are using suggests. Loctite is 20%

This is where I always get cross-eyed and I'm not trying to cause any extra confusion...But if the Ring gear provider specifies to add locktite and torque to XXX ft-lbs...have they already accounted for locktite and by further lowering it by 20% you're not going to generate enough torque on the bolt? Bolt torque is a standard value based on size, grade, and number of times the joint is designed to be taken apart. If its not meant to be taken apart or when it is, the bolt is replaced...they use 90% of proof load. If its for repeated assembly, then it 70 or 75 percent.

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This is where I always get cross-eyed and I'm not trying to cause any extra confusion...But if the Ring gear provider specifies to add locktite and torque to XXX ft-lbs...have they already accounted for locktite and by further lowering it by 20% you're not going to generate enough torque on the bolt? Bolt torque is a standard value based on size, grade, and number of times the joint is designed to be taken apart. If its not meant to be taken apart or when it is, the bolt is replaced...they use 90% of proof load. If its for repeated assembly, then it 70 or 75 percent.

View attachment 503709

What's crazy about that chart is that the values are reduced by 50%, not 20%. Also, Ring gear bolt specs in the FSM do not line up with that chart either whether you're using 3/8 or 7/16.

I know many people who just use an impact and tighten them up and have never had a single problem (obviously within reason) and that's the only way they do it (time=money).

For your torque spec of 55 ft/lbs, if you don't reduce by 20% then your torque with a lubricated thread would end up around 66 ft/lbs which isn't a huge difference. I'm sure plenty of people have done it both ways. It's when you get to the wrong spec in the FSM that shows to torque to 100 ft/lbs that will create issues.