Savvy off-road sold? (the unofficial Savvy customer support and Savvy rant thread)

Jerry has stickers.

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Every other option sucks. I could barely handle the thought of an AX-15.

It's a great upgrade. I was really fortunate that Blaine introduced me to the other half of my swap.

Edit: and the bump to an LS is an order of magnitude, or more, beyond this work.
 
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It's a great upgrade. I was really fortunate that Blaine introduced me to the other half of my swap.

Yeah, poor other fellow! Really though, how long did it take you guys?

Edit: are you still selling yours, or did your situation change and I missed it?
 
Yeah, poor other fellow! Really though, how long did it take you guys?

We could have gotten down to just under 2 solid days now that we have more experience, but I'd budget at least 3 if you have things side by side, otherwise I'd anticipate forgetting or finding surprising things along the way. It really depends on the people you're working with and having all the things on hand.

Mike, Josh, Tyler are all guys I know and trust - between the group we could drop the entire drive train bits pretty quickly on both rigs. The electronics are also fairly quick, granted some of the connectors are fiddly. Pedals take a lot of time, the center console, trans tunnel base plate, steering column stuff added in a good while. But I had no concerns the pieces they handled were done right. Anyone else I probably would have needed to micro manage.

Repairing or suring up the wiring harness while it's out is worthwhile, as is adding a quick disconnect for the gas tank wiring.

All that to say, my jeep was driving day 2. The other jeep had a shifting issue we found the cause of day 3 before noon (a spare part - a pilot bearing - fell into the clutch plate in a fluke accident in how we organized the swap spare parts I think).

Josh's took longer, but he did a bunch of other stuff along the way that is outstanding on mine (such as the trans cooler).
 
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We could have gotten down to just under 2 solid days now that we have more experience, but I'd budget at least 3 if you have things side by side, otherwise I'd anticipate forgetting or finding surprising things along the way. It really depends on the people you're working with and having all the things on hand.

Mike, Josh, Tyler are all guys I know and trust - between the group we could drop the entire drive train bits pretty quickly on both rigs. The electronics are also fairly quick, granted some of the connectors are fiddly. Pedals take a lot of time, the center console, trans tunnel base plate, steering column stuff added in a good while. But I had no concerns the pieces they handled were done right. Anyone else I probably would have needed to micro manage.

Repairing or suring up the wiring harness while it's out is worthwhile, as is adding a quick disconnect for the gas tank wiring.

All that to say, my jeep was driving day 2. The other jeep had a shifting issue we found the cause of day 3 before noon (a spare part - a pilot bearing - fell into the clutch plate in a fluke accident in how we organized the swap spare parts I think).

Josh's took longer, but he did a bunch of other stuff along the way that is outstanding on mine (such as the trans cooler).

Ok, well, that indicates it’s going to take me awhile. I’ve got several other things to do, and I don’t have an OD connector behind the dash, so all that wiring is coming out and all new harnesses going in. I’m going to do the evap and heater core while I’m there. I’ve got to run the transmission lines, cooler, and I’ll do the RMS and new oil pan while I’m there. Some of the little parts just aren’t there, things like oil pan magnet and O-Ring, so I imagine there’s quite a few other little things that might hang me up. Hopefully if I dedicate a week to it I can get it done, but if it takes longer I’m ok with that. Thanks for the description of your experience.

What are your thoughts about a Rubicrawler? Is that really worth it with an auto?
 
Ok, well, that indicates it’s going to take me awhile. I’ve got several other things to do, and I don’t have an OD connector behind the dash, so all that wiring is coming out and all new harnesses going in. I’m going to do the evap and heater core while I’m there. I’ve got to run the transmission lines, cooler, and I’ll do the RMS and new oil pan while I’m there. Some of the little parts just aren’t there, things like oil pan magnet and O-Ring, so I imagine there’s quite a few other little things that might hang me up. Hopefully if I dedicate a week to it I can get it done, but if it takes longer I’m ok with that. Thanks for the description of your experience.

What are your thoughts about a Rubicrawler? Is that really worth it with an auto?

The Rubicrawler is a nice option but I would be hesitant with the Teralow. Better to look for a 241 to mate with it.
 
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What are your thoughts about a Rubicrawler? Is that really worth it with an auto?

Run the ratios you would end up with. 10.88:1 with a 241 is excessively low with an automatic. 7.39:1 with a 231 is still very low, but usable.

The automatic, all by itself, changes everything you thought you knew and understood about technical off-road driving that it is really impossible and pointless to think about a RubiCrawler before you experience an automatic where the transmission matters. You drive and operate the lower gear reduction in an automatic very differently than you do with a manual.

In my experience so far, the upcoming regear to 5.38 with the 4:1 will be slightly nicer than the current 4.88 is. Having a 2.72:1 would be nice on occasion. But not $2k nicer when 4H becomes more useful off-road after the regear. The differences in gear reduction has everything to do with the nuance and the modulation in the throttle control with an automatic.
 
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We could have gotten down to just under 2 solid days now that we have more experience, but I'd budget at least 3 if you have things side by side, otherwise I'd anticipate forgetting or finding surprising things along the way. It really depends on the people you're working with and having all the things on hand.

Mike, Josh, Tyler are all guys I know and trust - between the group we could drop the entire drive train bits pretty quickly on both rigs. The electronics are also fairly quick, granted some of the connectors are fiddly. Pedals take a lot of time, the center console, trans tunnel base plate, steering column stuff added in a good while. But I had no concerns the pieces they handled were done right. Anyone else I probably would have needed to micro manage.
Know up front what you are going to do and that makes it easier.
Before you raise it on ramps to work under it, pull the console, shifter floor plate, shifter out of trans, knee blocker, and the pedals. That isn't more than an hour or two if you aren't in a hurry.
Repairing or suring up the wiring harness while it's out is worthwhile, as is adding a quick disconnect for the gas tank wiring.
We always butt connect staggered splices back the way it was. Most don't have the right connectors to make it other than that. We do and even then we still splice.
All that to say, my jeep was driving day 2. The other jeep had a shifting issue we found the cause of day 3 before noon (a spare part - a pilot bearing - fell into the clutch plate in a fluke accident in how we organized the swap spare parts I think).

Josh's took longer, but he did a bunch of other stuff along the way that is outstanding on mine (such as the trans cooler).
Another thing folks overlook is if one person can do something in 10 hours, 2 don't make that go twice as fast, it is generally a lot faster with 2 that cutting the time in half. Getting the trans in and out is much easier with 2 so you can watch things and keep it out of trouble.
 
What are your thoughts about a Rubicrawler? Is that really worth it with an auto?
Yes, but only under one very specific condition. It belongs on the front of an Atlas II t-case with the 2-1 ratio. That gives you 4 useable ratios. 1-1, 2.72-1, 2.0-1, and 5.44-1. Running it with the 231 gives you 2 useable ratios 1-1 and 2.72-1 twice. The 7.4-1 is stupid low, not even close to needed with the auto and generates torque so fast under bind that you will break shit before you can spit.

At least with the 241, you get 3 good ratios, 1-1, 2.72-1, and 4-1. Lot of money and effort for one more good ratio.
 
Yes, but only under one very specific condition. It belongs on the front of an Atlas II t-case with the 2-1 ratio. That gives you 4 useable ratios. 1-1, 2.72-1, 2.0-1, and 5.44-1. Running it with the 231 gives you 2 useable ratios 1-1 and 2.72-1 twice. The 7.4-1 is stupid low, not even close to needed with the auto and generates torque so fast under bind that you will break shit before you can spit.

At least with the 241, you get 3 good ratios, 1-1, 2.72-1, and 4-1. Lot of money and effort for one more good ratio.
My absolute favorite ratios…

🙂

The Rubicrawler / Atlas II combo is a 4 speed Atlas - at about half the length. Perfect for a TJ.
 
I received a box chock full of various sizes of Savvy stickers today.
Well Jerry, the same little bird that told me about your sticker package has let me know you are doing a stellar job as a brand ambassador. As such, they informed me that another box containing 300 stickers will be on the way to you soon.
 
Well Jerry, the same little bird that told me about your sticker package has let me know you are doing a stellar job as a brand ambassador. As such, they informed me that another box containing 300 stickers will be on the way to you soon.

No rear bumpers in this box either?
 
Well Jerry, the same little bird that told me about your sticker package has let me know you are doing a stellar job as a brand ambassador. As such, they informed me that another box containing 300 stickers will be on the way to you soon.

I sure hope there's white ones this time 🤞🤞