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Splicing Synthetic Winch Line

StG58

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OK, here we go. I'm going to try and get the splicing instructions for synthetic winch line from the Samson Rope site on here.

OK, that worked, but they are in PDF format and don't display in-line. You'll also need to have a splicing kit or several components and tools to properly splice 12 strand synthetic line. Something along the lines of this kit: http://www.winchline.com/viking-rope-repair-kit/
 

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Rob5589

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Really? Not that I looked but, would have never imagined you could mend synthetic winch line. Good to know as I have a winch with syn line on the way.
 
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StG58

StG58

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Really? Not that I looked but, would have never imagined you could mend synthetic winch line. Good to know as I have a winch with syn line on the way.
I was hoping that the Samson instructions would show up in all their glory. It's actually very simple and straight forward to splice 12 strand. Splicing also retains about 85-95% of the line's original strength.

Let's try this:
12-Strand Single Braid Bury Eye Splice
Rope splicing is a very strong method of fixing a loop eye; as the rope is pulled tighter so the spliced strands become more and more squeezed and locked into place. Rope splicing removes the worry of a knot becoming undone and a spliced eye is less bulky. You can buy 3-strand, 8-strand or 12-strand rope with an eye already spliced in or you you can make your own by following these instructions for eye splicing a rope.

STEP 1
sp10_1.jpe


From the rope's bitter end, measure back one full fid length. Place a mark on the rope (A). Put a single wrap of tape at the bitter end. (Fig 1) A fid length equals 21 times the diameter of the rope or 7 times the circumference.

STEP 2
Form the desired eye size and mark the point opposite A. This will be the mark B. (Figure 1)

STEP 3
From mark B, measure down the rope one full fid plus half fid, this will be mark C. (Figure 1)

STEP 4
From point A, counting toward the bitter end, count out 6 pics. Mark this pair and continue down the rope, marking every fifth pair as shown.

STEP 5
Cut and remove these strands back to the bitter end.

sp10_2.jpe

STEP 6

Re-tape the bitter end and attach it to your splicing tool. Insert this tool at B and exit at C. Pull through until A and B line up. Remove the tool and tape wrap from exposed tail. (Figure 2)

STEP 7
Firmly grasp the rope at the point where A and B meet. Smooth the rope away from this point, up the standing part of the line. The tapered tail will withdraw into the rope.

STEP 8
We recommend lock stitching and whipping the splice.

12-Strand Single Braid Lock Stitch Eye Splice
STEP 1
sp12_1.gif


Mark rope in 2-1/2 full fid lengths from the bitter end. Mark this A. Form the desired eye size and place a mark opposite A, mark this B. Measure 1 long fid section further. This is mark C. Continue down the rope an additional 2-1/2 fid lengths. Mark this D. (Figure 1)

STEP 2
sp12_2.gif


To mark the tuck points in the area between points B and C mark the 3rd, 6th and 9th pics. Open up B with a fid tool and pass the bitter end and tail through the rope completely. Pull the tail through until A and B align. Make subsequent tucks in the same manner between the 3rd and 4th, 6th and 7th strands. (Figure 2)

STEP 3
Pull the tucks tight as you go. After the last tuck above attach your splicing tool to the tail and insert it between the 9th and 10th strand exiting the rope at mark D. Remove the tool and the tape wrap from the tail end.

STEP 4
Work from the bitter end toward mark A, count three consecutive strand pairs and mark, count another five consecutive strand pairs and mark the 5th pair. Continue counting and marking the 5th consecutive strand pair until a total of 5 strand pairs have been marked. Cut and remove these strands back to bitter end and re-tape the bitter end. After taper is complete, hold rope at the neck of the splice and smooth cover until taper disappears.

NOTE: The rope may be too tight to bury before tapering, if so perform step 4 before steps 2 & 3.

12-Strand End-for-End Splice Class 1
splice2.gif


By following the procedure below, the splice can retain from 90% to 100% of average new rope strength and in used rope up to the same proportion of residual used rope strength.

splice3.gif

STEP 1 Marking Measurements

Tape ends of line to be spliced. Lay two ropes to be spliced side-by-side and measure one tubular fid length, (two wire fid lengths because wire fids are half the size) from taped end of each line and make a mark - mark 1.

splice4.gif


From mark 1 measure one tubular fid length (two wire fid lengths) and make mark 2 on both lines.

From mark 2 measure two tubular fid lengths (four wire fid lengths) and make mark 3 on both lines.

splice5.gif

STEP 2 Tapering Tail

From mark 1, in the direction of the tapered end of the line, mark every second right and left strand* for three strands.

Cut every marked strand and pull out of line (tape at end can cause resistance and may have to be removed in order to pull out cut strands).

Tapered end will now have only 6 strands remaining. tape tapered tail tightly to keep from unbraiding during the rope splicing process.

*Larger rope diameters may have pairs of strands in right and left direction. In this case, treat the pairs of strands as a single strand, marking and cutting both in each direction as described above.

STEP 3 Repositioning Ropes
Reposition ropes for splicing according to diagram below.

splice6.gif


splice7.gif

STEP 4 Burying Rope A Into Rope B

Attach fid to tapered end of rope A and insert fid into rope B at mark 2 and bring out at mark 3. Then remove fid.

Pull tapered tail of rope A until you have buried up to its mark 2. With larger lines, once you have fid and tapered tail through the line, tie off tail to stationary object; then use both hands and weight of body to bury rope B up to mark 2.

Leave tail sticking out.

splice8.gif

Step 5 Finish Burying

Attach tapered tail of rope B to fid. Insert fid into rope A approximately the diameter of the line away from insertion point of rope A into rope B. Bring fid and tail out at mark 3 of rope A. Following same procedures as in step 4 to bury rope B up to its mark 2. Leave tail sticking out.

splice9.gif

Step 6 Smooth Out Splice

Pull tails to tighten crossover. Then, smooth braid in both directions away from the crossover. Now cut off tails - cut the tails on an angle so as to give them a point.

Give a final smoothing, away from crossover, stroking rope firmly. Tails should bury inside cover. Rope splicing is a bit of an art, form as well as function.

Lock Stitching Procedure
splice10.gif

Step 1

From mark 2 at crossover, count 8 picks in either direction and insert stitching twine.

Step 2
splice11.gif


Working towards the crossover, pass end "b" back and forth through splice until a minimum of 2 complete stitches have been made on each side of crossover.

Step 3
splice12.gif


Tie an overhand knot in each tail, as close to its exit point as possible.

splice13.gif


Insert tail of stitching twine at extract location where twine emerges. Using a needle or small fid, pull (or push) through rope at a slight angle. Pull hard on the end of the twine so that the knot disappears inside the rope. Trim off the remaining twine close to the rope.
 
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StG58

StG58

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Really? Not that I looked but, would have never imagined you could mend synthetic winch line. Good to know as I have a winch with syn line on the way.
One of the major benefits of synthetic line is the ability to field repair it, and maintain almost the full strength of the line. It's not trivial to splice wire rope correctly.
 
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Rob5589

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Northwood

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https://wranglertjforum.com/threads/my-review-of-the-tre-safety-thimble-ii-tre-fairlead.298/
https://wranglertjforum.com/threads/how-to-install-a-safety-thimble-on-your-winch.299/

Here are a couple threads I found while researching. I was considering a thimble but with my knot tying skill (more like lack thereof) I may not :D
Really it's straight forward. I got my winch line from a marine supply shop. Followed samsons 12 strand buried tail eye splice to splice my tre safety thimble on. It hasn't failed me yet. Actually I think the one I used was called a locked brummel or something close to that, as I didn't feel like lock stitching the buried tail. It involves running the long end of the rope all the way through to effectively lock the splice
 
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StG58

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https://wranglertjforum.com/threads/my-review-of-the-tre-safety-thimble-ii-tre-fairlead.298/
https://wranglertjforum.com/threads/how-to-install-a-safety-thimble-on-your-winch.299/

Here are a couple threads I found while researching. I was considering a thimble but with my knot tying skill (more like lack thereof) I may not :D
A thimble, or better yet a safety thimble is mandatory with synthetic line. It's pretty easy stuff to splice correctly, though, and you can pick up some cheap 12 strand at the hardware store to practice with. It's not like double braid or parallel strand core where there's a lot of moving parts to keep straight.
 
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StG58

StG58

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Really it's straight forward. I got my winch line from a marine supply shop. Followed samsons 12 strand buried tail eye splice to splice my tre safety thimble on. It hasn't failed me yet. Actually I think the one I used was called a locked brummel or something close to that, as I didn't feel like lock stitching the buried tail. It involves running the long end of the rope all the way through to effectively lock the splice
Yup, the Locked Brummel is the second eye splice referenced above.

Sometimes you can pick up "drop" from rigging supply houses for cents on the dollar and use them as well. I'm looking for a good source for the abrasion sleeves to add to the thread. You could probably use kevlar single braid for that, but I want to verify that it's a workable / cost effective solution.
 

Northwood

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Yup, the Locked Brummel is the second eye splice referenced above.

Sometimes you can pick up "drop" from rigging supply houses for cents on the dollar and use them as well. I'm looking for a good source for the abrasion sleeves to add to the thread. You could probably use kevlar single braid for that, but I want to verify that it's a workable / cost effective solution.
I want to say I recall seeing something from blaine that those abrasion sleeves are a waste of time and can cause issues? Never heard an explanation or what those issues might be and may be misremembering, just thought I'd out it out there
 
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StG58

StG58

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I want to say I recall seeing something from blaine that those abrasion sleeves are a waste of time and can cause issues? Never heard an explanation or what those issues might be and may be misremembering, just thought I'd out it out there
Ya, just chased down some Blaine explanations on the wear guards...not going there. His three videos are pretty good at showing the dangers of the wear guards we get with stock ropes. Thanks for pointing that out!
 

Chris

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Well, @Chris, it seems I'm a day late and a dollar short on this then. Blaine has a good explanation with video in the kinked cable thread going on now as well covering winch line covers. :)
Yeah, I just saw that! When I first took this on I was worried that I'd do it wrong, but it's actually a lot easier than it seems!
 
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StG58

StG58

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12 strand single braid is lead pipe simple to splice correctly. All it takes is a little practice and the correct, inexpensive tools.
 
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StG58

StG58

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The hardest part is keeping the strands even and flat. Buy some cheap 12 strand and go for it! It's fun. With practice, you can run an eye splice in under ten minutes and have it turn out perfect every time.
 
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Mike_H

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Interesting...I've done 3 strand rope splices before cuz I can make dock lines a WHOLE lot better than you can buy them for my boat. Never tried a braided line though. Always looked too complicated.
 
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StG58

StG58

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Interesting...I've done 3 strand rope splices before cuz I can make dock lines a WHOLE lot better than you can buy them for my boat. Never tried a braided line though. Always looked too complicated.
Single braid is a whole different process. You're not weaving the lays togather like three strand. It's more like the Chinese handcuffs deal. The more tension on the line, the tighter the splice grips itself. And you absolutely need to use the right size round point fid to make the splice turn out smooth and functional. It's easy once you do a couple.