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This Jeep has always been out in the open

Red Dog

88M(30)
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Joined
Jan 12, 2019
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305
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Iowa, Trenton's Tiki Hut
If there is zero advantage to coils, why are they no longer using leaf springs?
Because changing out a single broken leaf is a PITA. Not sure how it would compare to coils, but definitely a PITA.

As a quasi-purist, I'd get another CJ if I could. First one I had needed way too much more TLC that I could afford to give it. But hot damn that military set-up felt nice and familiar. Until the Army removed them from the dispatch system I spent a good three years being the only person in my unit licensed on the Jeeps because of that CJ... good times 🆒
 
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Hammer24

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
186
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Because changing out a single broken leaf is a PITA. Not sure how it would compare to coils, but definitely a PITA.
Manufacturers don't care how easy it is for you to work on your car or jeep. Engines from 50 years ago are much easier to work on but that didn't stop them from changing them. If anything they want it to be difficult to work on so you take it to the dealer to get fixed.
 

Red Dog

88M(30)
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Jan 12, 2019
Messages
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Location
Iowa, Trenton's Tiki Hut
Manufacturers don't care how easy it is for you to work on your car or jeep. Engines from 50 years ago are much easier to work on but that didn't stop them from changing them. If anything they want it to be difficult to work on so you take it to the dealer to get fixed.
Agree with that 100%. I was thinking more along the lines of making it easier for the "authorized" mechanics. I'd imagine the various costs in leaf vs coil may be contributing factors as well, possibly even attempts for .mil contracts (easier to fix, quicker to get back to operational status).
 

Hammer24

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
186
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Agree with that 100%. I was thinking more along the lines of making it easier for the "authorized" mechanics. I'd imagine the various costs in leaf vs coil may be contributing factors as well, possibly even attempts for .mil contracts (easier to fix, quicker to get back to operational status).
Perhaps but it definitely isn't the reason manufacturers have stopped using them (as much)
 

Hammer24

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
186
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Not sure but the Wrangler and the Corvette used leafs until 1997.

View attachment 75722
Lot's utes (or trucks as you lot call them) still have them. Leaf springs and coil springs both have their own advantages and disadvantages. As far as I know, the only reason they still use them is because they're superior for towing and for carrying heavy loads in the bed.
 

Red Dog

88M(30)
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
305
Location
Iowa, Trenton's Tiki Hut
Lot's utes (or trucks as you lot call them) still have them. Leaf springs and coil springs both have their own advantages and disadvantages. As far as I know, the only reason they still use them is because they're superior for towing and for carrying heavy loads in the bed.
That would explain why most semi's still have them as well.
 

mots

Goldilocks Jeep Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 11, 2018
Messages
1,043
Location
OH, USA
Lot's utes (or trucks as you lot call them) still have them. Leaf springs and coil springs both have their own advantages and disadvantages. As far as I know, the only reason they still use them is because they're superior for towing and for carrying heavy loads in the bed.
That would explain why most semi's still have them as well.
Makes sense I guess, since the bed/load can be distributed over a larger area of spring support (as long as they are).
 

Red Dog

88M(30)
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Jan 12, 2019
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Iowa, Trenton's Tiki Hut
Makes sense I guess, since the bed/load can be distributed over a larger area of spring support (as long as they are).
Downside to that (at least with semi's) is unless you have a load heavier than your empty trailer it tends to be a bumpier ride. Flatbed with two APC's or a fully loaded CONEX is nice and smooth as long as you're not on I-90 East in Minnesota. The past 20 years or so they've gotten around that to an extend with air-ride seats. I'd put a pair in my TJ just for giggles if I had the time and money.
 
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Hammer24

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
186
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Downside to that (at least with semi's) is unless you have a load heavier than your empty trailer it tends to be a bumpier ride. Flatbed with two APC's or a fully loaded CONEX is nice and smooth as long as you're not on I-90 East in Minnesota. The past 20 years or so they've gotten around that to an extend with air-ride seats. I'd put a pair in my TJ just for giggles if I had the time and money.
Yeah it's the same with any ute's with leaf springs i've driven or been in, they ride pretty rough because the springs are too stiff for an empty bed.
 
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Sam Solo

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
Messages
146
Location
St. Louis
Very nice video and overall great message about a 1953CJ-3B and a 1947 Ken-Skill Kustom Kamper.

@Squatch I think you'll like this video. @Chris you as well.

This video introduced me to Petrolicous videos. It is my favorite of all their videos and they make awesome automobile videos. I go back to this one about 1-2 times a year. Great stuff, thanks for posting.
 

danof76

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
317
Location
San Antonio, TX
Lot's utes (or trucks as you lot call them) still have them. Leaf springs and coil springs both have their own advantages and disadvantages. As far as I know, the only reason they still use them is because they're superior for towing and for carrying heavy loads in the bed.
Aren't leaf suspensions mechanically simpler as well? A YJ has leafs, shocks and a sway bar. A TJ swaps the leafs for coils and adds control arms and a track bar to compensate for what the leafs would do by themselves.

If my old YJ was any indicator though a leaf suspension was indeed a much rougher ride than my TJ. Then again it had a lot of components that were rough around the edges.
 

Hammer24

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
186
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Aren't leaf suspensions mechanically simpler as well? A YJ has leafs, shocks and a sway bar. A TJ swaps the leafs for coils and adds control arms and a track bar to compensate for what the leafs would do by themselves.

If my old YJ was any indicator though a leaf suspension was indeed a much rougher ride than my TJ. Then again it had a lot of components that were rough around the edges.
True, less moving parts so less to go wrong, and cheaper and easier.
 

alittleoff

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
448
Location
So. Cal.
Hmm, wide angle lights adjustable through steering input?
Cable operated and connected to the drag link near the pitman arm somehow?
Two lights on mini spindles connected by a mini tie rod with mini heim joints.
Hmm
 

pagrey

TJ Addict
Joined
Apr 10, 2018
Messages
1,082
Location
Los Angeles, CA, USA
YJs are not even close to the TJ on the trail and it is entirely because of the suspension changes. I think most people here that haven't driven a YJ would be shocked at how terrible it is off and on road with the stock setup compared to a TJ. Front axle leaf suspension is a whole different world.
 
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