Water rolls off the lifted hard top glass into the Jeep

LJDC

TJ Enthusiast
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Feb 20, 2023
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D.C.
When it rains and I lift the hard top glass, water slides down the glass into the Jeep. Usually it ends up in the corner and in the plastic wiper cover.

I’ve checked the weather stripping, and it seems fine. (I bought new weather stripping and compared them side-by-side.) This has always been a problem, as far back as I can remember; but now I’m motivated to fix it.

Has anyone already solved this problem?

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My first attempt would be to rainx the glass in hopes that what doesn't roll off while the window is closed will stay beaded up and not roll off when it's opened.
 
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You do realize that is normal, right? The weather stripping is meant to keep water out when the rear glass is closed, not opened. Water naturally flows down. If you don't want water to do that, there are two solutions.
1. When it rains, don't open the window and rain won't get in the Jeep.
2. Take a towel and wipe the water off the rear glass, then water won't flow down the window into the Jeep. But, if it is raining, and you open the rear window, water will get in the Jeep. It is kind of what water does when you open windows and it is raining. Water gets inside.
 
You're opening a window while it's raining.
Where do you think it should go? :rolleyes:

wow, is THAT the problem? I thought it was about residual water AFTER it had rained (kinda like water on the soft top sloshing right on top of me when I pull myself into the seat by the grab handle on the roll bar).
 
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You're opening a window while it's raining.
Where do you think it should go? :rolleyes:

I’m opening a window and it has rained. Ideally I would like the water to go into the channel created by the weatherstripping, which is probably what’s supposed to happen.

If you look there, you’ll see a channel. That’s where water that drips off the hard top will go. But I’ll settle for off to the side.
 
I’m opening a window and it has rained. Ideally I would like the water to go into the channel created by the weatherstripping, which is probably what’s supposed to happen.

If you look there, you’ll see a channel. That’s where water that drips off the hard top will go. But I’ll settle for off to the side.

Only if the window is closed. There is a gap between the window and the top that allows the window to safely lift up. The weatherstripping seals the window against the top when closed, and allows any rain to go into the channel. When the window is open that defeats the seal. It is the same when you open a window at home. Any seal is defeated when the window is open, and it allows rain to pour into your home. It is the same for the seal around your Jeep doors. If the doors are opened, it defeats the seal.
 
Only if the window is closed. There is a gap between the window and the top that allows the window to safely lift up. The weatherstripping seals the window against the top when closed, and allows any rain to go into the channel. When the window is open that defeats the seal. It is the same when you open a window at home. Any seal is defeated when the window is open, and it allows rain to pour into your home. It is the same for the seal around your Jeep doors. If the doors are opened, it defeats the seal.

Not exactly. When water drips off the top of the hard top, it lands in the seal, and then it is channeled down, even when the window is open. The water from the glass, however, is angled in, mostly toward the corners.

In any event, I trying to think of ways to redirect the water away from inside the Jeep—especially the inside corners, where it tends to collect.

Early JLs had a channel above the front window that didn’t quite direct water far enough away, and it would end up in the cab. Someone came up with a rubber extension to the channel to direct water just a little farther away. I might try those.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08LCXQ24P/?tag=wranglerorg-20
 
wow, is THAT the problem? I thought it was about residual water AFTER it had rained (kinda like water on the soft top sloshing right on top of me when I pull myself into the seat by the grab handle on the roll bar).

No, you had it right. It’s residual water.
 
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It turns out that this was a problem for someone else as well, and a little company solved it. They cut a piece of Cordura that's the length of the lliftgate glass, attach one side under the weather stripping on the Jeep and the other side to the top inside edge of the liftgate glass. The result is that water that's on the glass is channeled down the sides, as it should be.

I know a lot of people live in places where it doesn't rain, or they never open the liftgate until the glass is completely dry, or they don't mind water inside the tailgate. So this post probably doesn't apply to you. On the other hand, if you also use your Jeep after it has rained but would prefer whatever is in the back not get wet, maybe you can make one of these for yourself (which is what I plan to do). I believe it will work on the TJ just like it'll fit on the JK.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0CP5GPR34/?tag=wranglerorg-20
 
This worked. I can now use the lift glass as a small shelter in the rain if I need to do something in the rear of the Jeep (e.g., find my rain jacket).

More important, when I open the tailgate glass after it rains, water doesn’t flow into the Jeep. It’s kind of a bummer if you need to fill your rear hot tub; but I like that water doesn’t pour in after a storm.

It seems to me that changing the design of the hinges so that the glass would tilt closer to the existing weather-stripping channel might solve the problem. So another option might be weather stripping on the inside of the glass that extends a few inches to guide water into that channel. But this solution is pretty easy.


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