What are you cooking today?

Dr. Pepper used to be the go to if memory serves. The color you have on that before foiling looks outstanding.



I could smash down that entire vat of rice with dumplings and egg rolls. I haven't been able to eat this kind of thing out for years now since developing an allergy to sesame in my mid-40s, fucking blows, pretty much all of this has sesame oil in it at least when you go out. I have to make it my self at home to avoid it, and that's a tall order :ROFLMAO:

My laboratory was open today for a Brooklyn 'Lucali' type pizza, came out pretty good, though I've never had a real one so I have no idea if I even came close:

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Nice! That looks really good!
 
Texas chili and sourdough cornbread. Sweet, not savory; it balances out the heat from the chili.
Two pounds of ground beef, a pound of venison sausage and a pound of the cross rib roast we smoked yesterday. Chipotles, onions, garlic, crushed/diced tomatoes and a Modelo.

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last evening's experiment, we went with New Haven style pizzas. I've never had a real one but the method looked interesting so we gave it a whirl. These pizzas are unique in several ways, they're a higher hydration dough than most, they're baked in coal fired ovens to a very 'well-done' state, not burnt but charred, & they're generally spartanly topped, the original as I understand it has only crushed tomatoes, oregano & grated pecorino, so no mozzarella or other toppings. They're also famous for the clam pie. I wanted to try it all so I went with a tomato pie, a tomato with mozzarella and a clam with mozzarella. This was also the official kick off of the 23-24 Tavern Night experience :LOL:

First up the tomato pie:

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the tomato with mozzarella:

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and finally the white clam pie with pecorino

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it was outstanding, I can understand why so many consider New Haven Connecticut to be the pizza capital of the United States, some say the world, though I think there are some folks in Italy that may contest that :ROFLMAO:
 
Baked a loaf of sourdough bread this morning to go with potato soup I’ll be making later today.

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looks good, love sourdough. I've steered away from baking boules in the cast iron as I needed something softer to take to work for lunch so I started making them in a loaf pan instead. Same exact dough just in a pan radically changes the final texture. Just pulled this one out of the oven:

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looks good, love sourdough. I've steered away from baking boules in the cast iron as I needed something softer to take to work for lunch so I started making them in a loaf pan instead. Same exact dough just in a pan radically changes the final texture. Just pulled this one out of the oven:

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Nice! I can imagine the smell just looking at the pic!


I only make boules from time to time anymore. When I have that artisan feeling on occasion, or we’re base camping. Mostly do loaves in iron pans for the week’s larder. One or two loaves. Or one sandwich and a couple French if we’re planning a pasta meal. Unless we’re needing (kneading? 🤣) more. Then we break out the Universal #8 and go to town. We’ve kept the same pot of sourdough for coming up on 20 years. Kinda use it for most everything. I make a mean sourdough æbelskiver 😉.

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Nice! I can imagine the smell just looking at the pic!


I only make boules from time to time anymore. When I have that artisan feeling on occasion, or we’re base camping. Mostly do loaves in iron pans for the week’s larder. One or two loaves. Or one sandwich and a couple French if we’re planning a pasta meal. Unless we’re needing (kneading? 🤣) more. Then we break out the Universal #8 and go to town. We’ve kept the same pot of sourdough for coming up on 20 years. Kinda use it for most everything. I make a mean sourdough æbelskiver 😉.

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man that contraption is really cool, loaves look spectacular too. I was doing my sourdough in the kitchen aid for a few years until I stumbled onto a youtube channel with a girl doing a different method, a basic autolyse for a couple hours followed by a few hours of periodic folding, gave that a whirl a couple months ago & now that's my go-to. Also I really can only do one loaf at a shot, living alone it's all I need... I slice large hunks & freeze to take out as needed.

My usual blend is 50/50 whole wheat/bread flour. I tried using organic dark rye flour to feed my starter but that slowed things down tremendously, had a few weeks in a row of poor results so I switched back to feeding it with bread flour & everything is back on target. Good strong starter with and a proper fermentation period = good oven spring, nothing better

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man that contraption is really cool, loaves look spectacular too. I was doing my sourdough in the kitchen aid for a few years until I stumbled onto a youtube channel with a girl doing a different method, a basic autolyse for a couple hours followed by a few hours of periodic folding, gave that a whirl a couple months ago & now that's my go-to. Also I really can only do one loaf at a shot, living alone it's all I need... I slice large hunks & freeze to take out as needed.

My usual blend is 50/50 whole wheat/bread flour. I tried using organic dark rye flour to feed my starter but that slowed things down tremendously, had a few weeks in a row of poor results so I switched back to feeding it with bread flour & everything is back on target. Good strong starter with and a proper fermentation period = good oven spring, nothing better

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It’s a Landers, Frary and Clark Universal Bread Dough Maker. They were graded by the number of loaves they made, 2, 4, 8. Really not too different than a Kitchen Aid in how it works. The dough hook even looks nearly the same. Wet ingredients first, then dry. Mix 3 minutes then set somewhere warm to rise in the bucket. Turn the crank to punch down after the first rise, then rise again. After the second rise, turn the crank again and pull the dough out with the crank and divide into the forms. It was designed to be an all in one labor saver. Height of technology 110 years ago when it was made, LOL.

We usually make unbleached white loaves. Occasionally white and a little whole wheat.
 
That looks fantastic! Is the cheese smoked, or the whole dish?

I used to smoke the cheese and the macaroni, then make it in the oven or slow cooker. Then I got lazy. Or inspired. I combine everything in the cast iron now, put it all in the smoker uncovered and run two or three smoke cycles with my wood of choice. Then let it slow cook in the smoker uncovered until the last hour or so. I don’t boil the macaroni before hand either. It goes in dry and softens as it cooks.
 
Not cooking it YET... This is a London Broil for Christmas Day dinner. First I do a rub on it and let it sit for a few hours with the rub on it. It's got a little bit of everything in the rub.

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Then I add all the liquids & onions plus fresh garlic & lemon juice to help cut the saltiness of some of the liquid.

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It's in a Tupperware marinade tray and will be flipped twice a day while in the refrigerator until Monday and will then be removed around 10AM and allowed to sit out until around 3PM when I'll put it on the grill. I have a searing burner where I'll sear the outside and then turn the center burner on low with the to adjacent burners will be turned up to about 3/4 and slow cook the roast.
I will also be cooking the bake potatoes and garlic bread on the grill. And that will be our Christmas dinner.