• Want to add an app icon for this forum to your mobile device's home screen? Check out this thread to see how.
  • Have an event you want to share? Check out the new forum event calendar and how-to use it in this thread here.
  • To both new members and existing members, please read this thread about posting your topics in the correct sub-forum. It makes my job (and my life) a lot easier!

What part is this?

bobthetj03

vibrajeep
Supporting Member
Ride of the Month Winner
Feb 3, 2017
9,160
NorCal
It's the windshield molding. You can take some sealant and glue it back in the channel. To replace it requires removing the windshield.
 
OP
DaisyJeep

DaisyJeep

New Member
Mar 2, 2019
23
Naples, FL
It's the windshield molding. You can take some sealant and glue it back in the channel. To replace it requires removing the windshield.
Looks like it's been glued at least once. It's stretched out and needs to be replaced. Looks like we'll be learning how to remove a windshield.
 

bobthetj03

vibrajeep
Supporting Member
Ride of the Month Winner
Feb 3, 2017
9,160
NorCal
Check your auto insurance. If you have a low enough deductible, just have the windshield and molding replaced by a professional. I almost guarantee you your current windshield is full of tiny chips.
 

JEEPCJTJ

TJ Addict
Supporting Member
I did auto glass for a few years. If your windshield is damaged and you have insurance, that's the easy way to go. I don't recall any insurance ever paying for what I would call the "multiple sandblasted chips" but I'm sure that several owners just mysteriously ended up with a broken windshield somehow to get it replaced. I'd want to watch the installers to make sure any scratches in the paint that is hidden behind the glass are taken care of. The best thing they could use for that is a black urethane primer. Some urethane "glues" have primer in them, I never liked them and always had a bottle of primer to use when needed.

If you don't have insurance and that gaskety thing is too long, I'd suggest cutting it in the center, using epoxy to glue one side in place then figure out where you need to cut the other side and epoxy it back on. I'd do my best to use the epoxy towards the inside of the Jeep and not near the glass.

Stay away from using silicone, it can mess up the urethane that is holding the windshield in. I've seen several leaks caused by it and at least a few windshields just kind of sitting where the belong but not really attached to the car.
 
OP
DaisyJeep

DaisyJeep

New Member
Mar 2, 2019
23
Naples, FL
I did auto glass for a few years. If your windshield is damaged and you have insurance, that's the easy way to go. I don't recall any insurance ever paying for what I would call the "multiple sandblasted chips" but I'm sure that several owners just mysteriously ended up with a broken windshield somehow to get it replaced. I'd want to watch the installers to make sure any scratches in the paint that is hidden behind the glass are taken care of. The best thing they could use for that is a black urethane primer. Some urethane "glues" have primer in them, I never liked them and always had a bottle of primer to use when needed.

If you don't have insurance and that gaskety thing is too long, I'd suggest cutting it in the center, using epoxy to glue one side in place then figure out where you need to cut the other side and epoxy it back on. I'd do my best to use the epoxy towards the inside of the Jeep and not near the glass.

Stay away from using silicone, it can mess up the urethane that is holding the windshield in. I've seen several leaks caused by it and at least a few windshields just kind of sitting where the belong but not really attached to the car.
I do have insurance, but don't want to file a claim for this. Great info on the epoxy vs. silicone! Thank you!
 

billiebob

TJ Addict
Supporting Member
Oct 31, 2015
3,943
Kootenays, BC, Canada
At least talk to a glass shop. Eventually you will need to replace the windshield. Don't use a product which will add to the work when you do. A glass shop might not charge much more than a tube of epoxy to fix it. Be the professional, call a professional.
 

mrblaine

TJ Expert
Supporting Member
Nov 20, 2015
5,644
Quail Valley, CA
I do have insurance, but don't want to file a claim for this. Great info on the epoxy vs. silicone! Thank you!
Weatherstrip adhesive would be the most appropriate for that repair. Squirt some in the channel, shove it up over the lip and tape it in place. If you wanted to mimic the factory install, get some 1/4" butyl rubber rope and use it.