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Why is there a skid plate under the transfer case?

P man

Keister Bunny
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Your mount appears to allow no rotation of the power train around the torque axis. I would think that after awhile the metal plate that bolts to the TC might fatigue and fail due to this.

Are you saying a conventional trans mount would be a better idea? Walk me through your thought process please
 

SvtLdr

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Your mount appears to allow no rotation of the power train around the torque axis. I would think that after awhile the metal plate that bolts to the TC might fatigue and fail due to this.
It's tough to see from the first photo. Here's a closer look at the rubber mount I made.

20210520_211408.jpg
 
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pagrey

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I don't think of the big thing as a skid but more as a removable cross-member as many people have said. I don't think Jeep designed the rear mount to take twisting loads or to restrict them, the engine mounts keep the assembly from rotating. Mounts that have rubber isolators at the frame in the rear and allow less flex than the engine mounts are not something I'd ever do for that reason. I've never heard of anything but engine mount bosses breaking off the block and it's never been attributed to a strange rear mount so it's entirely my personal bias and stupidity. I just think all good aftermarket designs keep the forces really similar to how the factory designed them to be dealt with. You don't need to research the correct height for the shovel or that cross-member, if it's too low for the way you wheel you'll know it.
 

hear

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Your mount appears to allow no rotation of the power train around the torque axis. I would think that after awhile the metal plate that bolts to the TC might fatigue and fail due to this.

how is it different from how the factory skid mounts to the transmission? Unless he's missing the rubber transmission mount it should be equivalent.

Which does bring up a good question: if you build your own crossmember that incorporates the transmission mount, do you have to modify the factory skid to allow it to clear the new crossmember, since the trans mount bolts through the skid?
 
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Akitadog

Willy's Edition
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I run a UCF ultra clearance skid still. This is just so I can access it for maintenance etc without it being supported.

Same UCF skid here. and Atlas too. Did you cut the channel out of the skid?
I just cut a 2" dia. hole to get access to the Atlas drain plug.
 
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SvtLdr

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how is it different from how the factory skid mounts to the transmission? Unless he's missing the rubber transmission mount it should be equivalent.

Which does bring up a good question: if you build your own crossmember that incorporates the transmission mount, do you have to modify the factory skid to allow it to clear the new crossmember, since the trans mount bolts through the skid?

That was my goal, by keeping the trans mount in the center.

I tucked the drivetrain high enough to clear a flat skid that I made. So no interference between the two.

20210618_161016.jpg
 
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TurboTJ

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It's tough to see from the first photo. Here's a closer look at the rubber mount I made.

View attachment 345814

It looks very strong so it is probably not an issue. But this illustrates what I was talking about. The axis of your sleeve is at a right angle to the torque axis. The engine/tranny does not twist much, but the engine mounts are rubber (at least the OEM ones are) so there is some twisting under load. Step on the gas and see how much your manual shift lever moves to the side. Your bushing looks like it probably has a lot of give though, even at a right angle.
 

Rescue6

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Same UCF skid here. and Atlas too. Did you cut the channel out of the skid?
I just cut a 2" dia. hole to get access to the Atlas drain plug.

Unfortunately I had to notch it a bit to clear the back of the Atlas 4speed. It’s 1” lower in that area. This next winter I’m going to cut the tub and make a new floor pan section so I can get it tucked up even higher and I’ll cut the lowered section out of the skid plate and make it flat again.

CAA0A9FC-D8BC-4F39-9D41-80FB4D9C70DD.jpeg


B34A521F-2C77-4756-8507-85E5EB69B158.jpeg
 
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