Window Shopping for Ramp Trucks or Roll Backs

My GCVWR is 30,000 lbs on my truck but I don't think I can legally tow over 26,000 lbs without additional licensing. I'd love to be wrong on this.

Here's what the state of Washington says for you. They are essentially the same rules as in MN.

https://dol.wa.gov/driver-licenses-and-permits/commercial-driver-licenses-cdl/do-i-need-cdl#:~:text=You must have a commercial,of 26,001 pounds or more

Do I need a CDL?​

Depending on the type of vehicle you drive, you may need a commercial driver license (CDL). Learn what types of vehicles require a CDL.

Types of vehicles that require a CDL​

You must have a commercial driver license (CDL) to drive any of the following vehicles:
  • All single vehicles with a manufacturer's weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • All trailers with a manufacturer's weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more, and a combined vehicle's gross weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • All vehicles that are designed to transport 16 or more persons (including the driver) including private and church buses.
  • All school buses, regardless of size
  • All vehicles that are used to transport any material that requires hazardous material placarding or any quantity of a material listed as a select agent or toxin in 42 CFR 73

Types of vehicles that don't require a CDL​

By law, the following types of drivers don't need a commercial driver license (CDL):
  • Farmers transporting farm equipment, supplies, or products* to or from a farm in a farm vehicle are exempt if the vehicle is operated by the farmer or a farm employee, not used in the operation of a common or contract motor carrier, or used within 150 miles of the farm (in an air-mile radius)
  • If farmers meet all requirements of the farm exemption, they may operate farm-exempt vehicles between the states of Idaho and Oregon
  • Firefighters and law enforcement personnel are exempt when operating emergency equipment if they carry the certification card proving they have completed the Emergency Vehicle Accident Prevention Program (EVAP).
  • Recreational vehicle (RV) operators are exempt when driving an RV for non-commercial purposes. This exemption includes 2-axle rental trucks and horse trailers.
  • Military commercial drivers are exempt only when they are operating the proper military vehicle under a military license issued by their branch of the service. Military members who want to obtain a CDL and are currently on active duty or those within one year of discharge, see Military experience waiver.
  • Drivers of vehicles with air brakes that don't otherwise qualify as commercial vehicles. Even though a vehicle is equipped with air brakes, it doesn't automatically mean the driver must have a CDL. If the vehicle doesn't meet the criteria listed under types of vehicles that require a CDL, the driver is exempt.
*Farm products include Christmas trees or wood products transported by vehicles weighing no more than 40,000 pounds licensed gross vehicle weight. This weight restriction applies only to Christmas trees and wood products.

My suggestion is you go to a weigh station and talk to one of the officers there. As how I understand the rules if you aren't hauling for profit the rules of needing a CDL do not apply. And yes I used to think that I had to have special license for over 26,000 lbs too.
 
My suggestion is you go to a weigh station and talk to one of the officers there. As how I understand the rules if you aren't hauling for profit the rules of needing a CDL do not apply. And yes I used to think that I had to have special license for over 26,000 lbs too.

Everything I've read on it says additional licensing would be needed.

Even in the picture that I initially commented on. That trailer is definitely over 10,001 lbs so it'd require additional licensing in Washington.

Based on the Washington laws if your trailer that you pull behind your motorhome is 10,001 lbs or more and your GCVWR is over 26,001 lbs you're in CDL territory even as a motorhome.
 
Everything I've read on it says additional licensing would be needed.

Even in the picture that I initially commented on. That trailer is definitely over 10,001 lbs so it'd require additional licensing in Washington.

Based on the Washington laws if your trailer that you pull behind your motorhome is 10,001 lbs or more and your GCVWR is over 26,001 lbs you're in CDL territory even as a motorhome.

And I'm telling you that WA does not have a additional license like some states do. Go talk to someone who knows the laws. The way they write them most of us can't make heads or tails of them.
 
And I'm telling you that WA does not have a additional license like some states do. Go talk to someone who knows the laws. The way they write them most of us can't make heads or tails of them.

I will eventually before I buy my trailer but it doesn't matter if I stay under 14,500 GVWR on the trailer since that will keep me under 26,001 lbs GCWR so it won't matter.

If your GVWR of your trailer is 10,001 lbs or more and you add it to your GCVR of your MH if it's above 26,001 lbs you do need a class A in Washington so if you meet that and I were you, I'd go ask too.
 
I will eventually before I buy my trailer but it doesn't matter if I stay under 14,500 GVWR on the trailer since that will keep me under 26,001 lbs GCWR so it won't matter.

If your GVWR of your trailer is 10,001 lbs or more and you add it to your GCVR of your MH if it's above 26,001 lbs you do need a class A in Washington so if you meet that and I were you, I'd go ask too.

WA does NOT have a non-commercial Class A license. I know this because I used to have a CDL in WA with every endorsement other than a bus driver. And I've gone and asked to make sure I was legal. I don't plan on having a trailer more than 10K but my motorhome is about 18.5K lbs loaded so I'll be over 26K lbs even with just my car trailer and the Jeep.

Edit: I don't know how else I can explain this. A CDL license is ONLY required if you're making money while driving.
 
Here's the RCW from WA on this whole debacle..

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https://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=46.25.050

And to help out a little more.

https://www.campanda.com/magazine/rv-special-drivers-license-requirements/

Do you need a special license to drive an RV?​

Unless you’re going BIG, probably not. Most states do not require a special license for RVs weighing under 26,000 pounds or towed vehicles under 10,000 pounds. Vehicles that can carry more than 16 passengers are often subject to special licensing (so you know, don’t go RVing in a literal school bus).
How much Class A Class C Class B weighs
Most RVs weigh well under 26,000 pounds. For reference, the average Class B RV weighs between 6,000 and 8,000 pounds, while a Class C vehicle typically weighs between 10,000 and 12,000 pounds. Class A vehicles can weigh anywhere from 13,000 to 30,000 pounds. In other words, for most kinds of RVs and campers, you do not need a special license. However, each state has it’s own rules, which can make things confusing for RV renters and new owners. To make it easy to find the information you need, we broke down the rules, state-by-state. Keep reading for Campanda‘s comprehensive guide to RV driver’s license requirements in every US state. Note: This article was updated in January 2018. We have done our best to ensure that the information is accurate, but state laws, rules and regulations are subject to change. We highly recommend that you check with your local DMV to confirm the details below before buying, renting or driving any RV.

What is a special license?​

Broadly speaking, there are two types of special licenses: a commercial and non-commercial license. Some states require you to have a non-commercial special license in order to drive a recreational vehicle over a certain length or weight. Other states will require you to have a commercial driver’s license (CDL) — the kind of license needed for large and heavy vehicles likes buses or tractor trailers.
 
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Licensed as a RV with "Not For Hire" or other markings no CDL is required. It's considered a RV so is just like a big diesel pusher.

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The KEY wording here is that you are hauling for private use so the CDL rules do not apply.

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Here's ya a NICE one. But ya got to be able to drive a 13 speed...
2011 Freightliner with 60 Series Detroit w/730,000 mile. Engine was rebuilt but poster didn't say when.
$60K is asking price.

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Here's ya a NICE one. But ya got to be able to drive a 13 speed...
2011 Freightliner with 60 Series Detroit w/730,000 mile. Engine was rebuilt but poster didn't say when.
$60K is asking price.

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I really like this set up myself. I learned how to drive a thirteen speed after I graduated highschool and my younger sisters and I took a grayhound bus from Sacramento to San Antonio to spend the summer with our dad. One of my older brothers and my dad we're hauling cattle from the auction yards all over Texas to San Antonio slaughter house. They both were driving GMC cab overs with the thirteen speed and both put me straight into the driver's seat when I rode with either of them. Oh, and we were drinking everyday, and I did not have a Texas license. It was literally one of the best summers of my life. 🍻
 
I really like this set up myself. I learned how to drive a thirteen speed after I graduated highschool and my younger sisters and I took a grayhound bus from Sacramento to San Antonio to spend the summer with our dad. One of my older brothers and my dad we're hauling cattle from the auction yards all over Texas to San Antonio slaughter house. They both were driving GMC cab overs with the thirteen speed and both put me straight into the driver's seat when I rode with either of them. Oh, and we were drinking everyday, and I did not have a Texas license. It was literally one of the best summers of my life. 🍻

I'd have no trouble driving it either. Would have been nice if the Owner had posted more information about it. And setup to haul a TJ & still tow a 5th wheel is great.
 
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I really like this set up myself. I learned how to drive a thirteen speed after I graduated highschool and my younger sisters and I took a grayhound bus from Sacramento to San Antonio to spend the summer with our dad. One of my older brothers and my dad we're hauling cattle from the auction yards all over Texas to San Antonio slaughter house. They both were driving GMC cab overs with the thirteen speed and both put me straight into the driver's seat when I rode with either of them. Oh, and we were drinking everyday, and I did not have a Texas license. It was literally one of the best summers of my life. 🍻

I should of mentioned that I graduated highschool in 1975. That's when Texas was Texas, and actually, California was a pretty damn good state, long before it took a shit.
 
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I should of mentioned that I graduated highschool in 1975. That's when Texas was Texas, and actually, California was a pretty damn good state, long before it took a shit.

I wasn't too far behind you since I should have graduated in 1979 but got kicked out in 1977 and then joined the Army in 1978. Drinking age was still 18 & yes CA & WA hadn't taken a huge shit yet... They raised the drinking age while I was stationed in Germany so I'd been drinking for 3 years & then come back to the states and was only 20....
 
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