Great deals on TJ parts on Amazon!

Looking for parts for your Jeep Wrangler TJ? Checkout the selection of TJ parts Amazon has to offer, many with 2-day Prime shipping!

Click the image below to browse TJ parts on Amazon.

Jeep Wrangler TJ Parts on Amazon

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Woodrow's 97 Green TJ Moderate Build

OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
I‘ve had this TJ for 3 years now and have done a few mechanical things but other than cleaning, really nothing purely cosmetic. In part, this is because I don’t think much looks nicer than a stock-ish TJ. So anything I add for looks would probably just screw it up😃. One little thing has been bugging me though. A previous owner sprayed bed liner on what I assume were stock sport flares. This was hard to clean and the flares were small with 12.5” tires and 3.75” backspace wheels. That led to mud not only on the body but also coming in through open windows. I looked for Sahara or Rubicon flares a little, but they are generally priced too high and still don’t give much more coverage. There are a few 6 and 7” options out there but they don’t look right to me. Then @TheBoogieman put Rough Country 5.5” flares on his Rubi and I thought those flares hit the perfect compromise between stock looks and better coverage (thanks for sharing, dude). I bought a set and put them on. Simple right? Pretty much, but it still took me a week plus 🙄. The Rough Country flares don’t come with hardware. That’s fine. I ordered Crown’s hardware kit and some new side marker lenses as mine were cracked and dirty.

I saw a guy on you tube cut the old flares and pull the wheels. I can tell you both made removal easier:
8D15E7FC-E083-4328-830F-BDFB32ACC22C.jpeg

1CC8C3F1-CFA5-4716-A621-A859548467D2.jpeg


A few issues:
1) The Crown kit (4918K) isn’t complete. It came with 6 nutserts and there are 16 in total for a set of TJ flares. Fortunately, exactly 6 of my 16 spun and had to be pulled and replaced (how did they know?!). It did have enough of the wood screw type bolts and plastic nuts. Finally, the rear wheel well liners are held in with 14 plastic push pins. The kit had only 6 new ones. I bought another 8 from a local auto parts store (Dorman 963-018D).

2) The paint on my TJ is sub-optimal but I have always kind of liked the patina and haven’t waxed it since I’ve owned it. But, with the flares off, it seemed like a good opportunity. So I pulled the rear lights, plate, spare and snubbers and got ‘er done:
33E74517-D4AD-4C8F-92D2-F0999D639AB3.jpeg

2F5C74E0-941B-43A6-8BE1-5F77788B4775.jpeg

3) ’97 TJs have all kinds of idiosyncrasies, and here’s another: The aftermarket front/side marker lenses are all 97-06. But my early ‘97 (mfg May 96) has different sockets. So I had to buy and splice in new sockets for the later model lenses. In the pic, you can see the old and new lenses and sockets (new=Standard S789). Bulbs are the same (Sylvania 194).
7DD58465-2DEE-4CD0-8EF6-64B2B2E128A0.jpeg

So, after more effort than I planned, here is the finished product:
2C0EBE25-5988-4AAD-8AC3-98BF7B4F7D99.jpeg

ED0AF711-A31C-44EA-97E4-B663AD3ED4BE.jpeg
1C748C34-3817-4271-9A4F-1E656C2D40CE.jpeg

FCF43DD6-C66D-44F2-AD43-DFF97412D19B.jpeg

I like the stock looks with increased coverage (still a little tire sticking out, which looks good, I think). My only complaint is the “RC” logo on the front but, whatever.
 

TheBoogieman

Disturbed American
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Messages
6,746
Location
C-Ville VA
I‘ve had this TJ for 3 years now and have done a few mechanical things but other than cleaning, really nothing purely cosmetic. In part, this is because I don’t think much looks nicer than a stock-ish TJ. So anything I add for looks would probably just screw it up😃. One little thing has been bugging me though. A previous owner sprayed bed liner on what I assume were stock sport flares. This was hard to clean and the flares were small with 12.5” tires and 3.75” backspace wheels. That led to mud not only on the body but also coming in through open windows. I looked for Sahara or Rubicon flares a little, but they are generally priced too high and still don’t give much more coverage. There are a few 6 and 7” options out there but they don’t look right to me. Then @TheBoogieman put Rough Country 5.5” flares on his Rubi and I thought those flares hit the perfect compromise between stock looks and better coverage (thanks for sharing, dude). I bought a set and put them on. Simple right? Pretty much, but it still took me a week plus 🙄. The Rough Country flares don’t come with hardware. That’s fine. I ordered Crown’s hardware kit and some new side marker lenses as mine were cracked and dirty.

I saw a guy on you tube cut the old flares and pull the wheels. I can tell you both made removal easier:
View attachment 325033
View attachment 325032

A few issues:
1) The Crown kit (4918K) isn’t complete. It came with 6 nutserts and there are 16 in total for a set of TJ flares. Fortunately, exactly 6 of my 16 spun and had to be pulled and replaced (how did they know?!). It did have enough of the wood screw type bolts and plastic nuts. Finally, the rear wheel well liners are held in with 14 plastic push pins. The kit had only 6 new ones. I bought another 8 from a local auto parts store (Dorman 963-018D).

2) The paint on my TJ is sub-optimal but I have always kind of liked the patina and haven’t waxed it since I’ve owned it. But, with the flares off, it seemed like a good opportunity. So I pulled the rear lights, plate, spare and snubbers and got ‘er done:
View attachment 325022
View attachment 325019
3) ’97 TJs have all kinds of idiosyncrasies, and here’s another: The aftermarket front/side marker lenses are all 97-06. But my early ‘97 (mfg May 96) has different sockets. So I had to buy and splice in new sockets for the later model lenses. In the pic, you can see the old and new lenses and sockets (new=Standard S789). Bulbs are the same (Sylvania 194).
View attachment 325024
So, after more effort than I planned, here is the finished product:
View attachment 325031
View attachment 325027View attachment 325028
View attachment 325030
I like the stock looks with increased coverage (still a little tire sticking out, which looks good, I think). My only complaint is the “RC” logo on the front but, whatever.
Looking good! 👍
 
  • Like
Reactions: Woodrow
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
No fun Jeep work lately. Just actual work and chores. I’ve been working my way through 1000’ of fence:
8A353CAD-12A4-4FBF-8E9A-143E6EE5CD42.jpeg

It rained all night and most of today so I got a little garage time in this afternoon.

For months, I’ve had a UCF skid that will lift my transfer case almost 2”. Before I install it, I need to do several things. First, a T-case cable shifter. I’ve been lucky with my stock linkage. It works well now with the stock skid and it also did with the 1.5” transfer case drop my TJ had when I bought it. But, for the tuck, I picked up the Savvy cable shifter for my NP231.
204D3617-0AEE-4F82-98DE-AD7A4D8755BA.jpeg

It is well reviewed here and elsewhere but of course, no instructions. However, thanks to folks on the forum and you tube, it’s not too hard.

Step 1, remove the four 10mm bolts from the stock tub bracket by peeling back the carpet on the tunnel:
C9A1130E-4A7C-42EA-A5E1-C92259B4188F.jpeg

Step 2, put the Jeep on a lift and support the transmission and T-case skid (for those under 50, support transmission and then skip to step 3):
C335697B-0A38-46D6-850D-58C6A4DF8A5B.jpeg

Here is the view with the tub bracket loose and T-case skid and front driveshaft out of the way:
39442681-0F16-44FE-AE23-C02F3DC6ED1A.jpeg

Step 3, remove the linkage.
9/16” nut + washer on the case:
EB8EBF22-2388-40A1-9F13-C3737879DD23.jpeg

Then pry the linkage shaft out of the bushing in the T-case bracket and remove the two 9/16” nuts from the T-case bracket:
084C7036-C3C8-48D8-957B-21BE58D13F90.jpeg
All the old stuff is now out:
8C378ACC-D4E1-47A4-9E80-99D3E467557B.jpeg

1677B517-6005-4036-AF87-42E2048AD3FD.jpeg

Step 4: Install new shifter:
The Savvy system has 2 new brackets that mount where the stock brackets were and the linkage is replaced by the cable which heads forward from the shift lever and turns 180 degrees down and toward the rear to go to the transfer case. There are two 15/16” nuts and a lock washer on each bracket to adjust cable length on either end. Hardware to attach the cable on both ends is in the kit including a new lever arm on the T-case end. New nuts, bolts and washers for the tub bracket are included. The three 9/16” nuts for the T-case lever and bracket are re-used.
20B0EFEB-8B71-4DAC-A278-B0C8B392C615.jpeg

I used blue loctite on all bolts and a dab of lithium grease on the pins at each end. When doing initial cable adjustment, I just made sure the shift lever and T-case lever were both in the same position. I used 4L as my reference (which is T-case lever all the way to rear on the NP231). A quick test drive seemed all good but fine tuning wii be straight forward, if necessary.
4350A23A-50BC-4E4F-AB3C-0FC092DDE064.jpeg
 
Last edited:
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
I have been wanting to do a mild tummy tuck for a while. A UCF no body lift skid has occupied a corner in my garage for over 6 months. The Savvy T-case cable shifter I recently installed was progress. Next, the Motor Mount Lift. The Savvy 1” blocks I ordered never showed so I picked up some JKS 1” aluminum blocks instead. I wanted to maintain the stock mounts for reduced NVH. The install wasn’t as easy as I‘d hoped. It would clearly have been better to do when I swapped in the stroker but, oh well. I made a wood adapter to allow me to lift the motor with a pole jack while the TJ was on my lift and without pushing on the bottom of the oil pan:

28CF7CBC-EFB3-4C19-B5A7-0334408A88ED.jpeg

The driver’s side was straight forward. Lots of room:
9BE2F01B-D6C8-448E-BF92-D3BB848B0E4B.jpeg

On the passenger’s side, not so much. The engine block bracket and one of it’s bolts contacted both the frame side bracket and the lift block requiring some metal trimming to allow reasonable clearance:
DA016FD3-65E7-4527-9C9E-D719C309D0C3.jpeg


9D672740-C9FB-4908-99F0-84B8875A738D.jpeg


BA9128B9-F128-40D9-BE3F-D0437CAD9287.jpeg


C8697AE7-15F3-44DD-9B1A-4E85B90CAAE8.jpeg

Once I was satisfied with the MML, it was time to test fit the new UCF skid 😀:
86F59755-7FC4-4E7C-8EAB-A6D73F2FAC0A.jpeg

The UCF aluminum skid is not drilled for the stock conical bolts so I used new grade 8 bolts and flat washers torqued to 75 ft.lbs. As this is a structural frame crossmember, I wonder how much strength/rigidity I’m giving up without the conical bolts. If I could find the right stuff, I suppose conical drilled aluminum washers could be welded on to allow use of the conical bolts….
On the plus side, the new skid weighs about 20# less and only hangs down 2.5”, vs 4 1/8” for my stock skid:
AD00A0CE-5932-4BCE-A0C3-872C4FDB937D.jpeg

Using the stock style (anchor) transmission mount, my NP231 is raised 1 5/8”. With that and the 1" MML, no clearance problems were created in the tunnel for the T-case or my AX-15. The shifter lever is higher in the cab but doesn’t contact the console or tunnel hole. Even my fan shroud has good clearance in a stock position. The air intake tube does lightly touch the plastic bracket that secures the throttle cable to the valve cover, so I’ll need to put some washers under the stock air box to raise it slightly.

Ground clearance is now 17” the the bottom of the skid (3” spring lift on 33s):
C5EC66F5-F34E-4861-B8B3-DECF49CAB41E.jpeg


B5EC7A38-FC59-4FA6-A128-478416F42F3D.jpeg

Now on to driveline angles.

I have a full set of Savvy double adjustable arms that I have been waiting to install with the skid. So far, I’ve just installed the Savvy UCAs. The mounting bolts for the uppers are all 7/16” so the bracket holes need to be drilled (stock are 3/8”, I think). Using a digital angle finder zeroed on the skid, my drive line angles went from 7 to 8 degrees front and 16 to 20 degrees rear. Both shafts are DC. Before I changed my UCAs and reset my pinion angles, I took it for a quick drive because I was curious about vibrations with that much change. To my great surprise, vibes were minimal up to 70 mph.

Nevertheless, after installing the Savvy UCAs, I set the rear pinion to 19.5 degrees and front to 8. It was a trial and error process, setting my pinion angles by guess on the lift and then checking at ride height with one UCA connected. (edit: you can easily spin the Savvy double adjustable arm by hand and rotate the axle with Jeep on the ground). When I had the angle I wanted, at ride height, I attached the 2nd UCA adjusted with no tension and tightened everything up. On my next test drive, I got up to 75mph and all was very smooth. I can’t really figure a good way to measure caster and the steering is a little quicker feeling. I may need to have an alignment shop get me some caster numbers. I think the front drive shaft may tolerate another degree flatter pinion. We shall see…

I still need to do a little exhaust and rear track bar work for better clearance and install the new LCAs but the TJ is drivable and it feels like some good progress has been made. Thanks to all here whose sharing of knowledge and experience has helped me get this far.
 
Last edited:

NashvilleTJ

I miss the snow...
Supporting Member
Ride of the Month Winner
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
3,897
Location
Nashville
Nice work. You can get a reasonably close measurement of caster by putting your angle finder on top of the upper ball joint castle nut. What I do is sit an appropriately sized socket over the ball joint bolt so it sits flush on the nut (you may have to pull the cotter pin), and then sit the angle finder on the socket. Just remember to zero out the angle finder for the slope if the jeep is not sitting on a level surface.
 
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
Nice work. You can get a reasonably close measurement of caster by putting your angle finder on top of the upper ball joint castle nut. What I do is sit an appropriately sized socket over the ball joint bolt so it sits flush on the nut (you may have to pull the cotter pin), and then sit the angle finder on the socket. Just remember to zero out the angle finder for the slope if the jeep is not sitting on a level surface.
Thanks! Using a socket on a castle nut to place the angle finder is a good idea. I tried putting my angle finder on the ball joint next to the zerk and on a few different places on the yoke but I couldn't get repeatable numbers. I did remember to zero on the ground as opposed to the frame or skid which I used for the pinions and driveshafts.
 
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
Before I finish the tummy tuck project by installing the Savvy LCAs and doing the final axle rotation adjustment with the already installed Savvy UCAs, I wanted to eliminate some mild vibes I had which I have suspected to be wheel balance related. I’ve thought this because the vibe is inconsistent at around 60 mph, doesn’t change with accel/decel/cruise status and improved with a rebalance when I moved one particularly non-round wheel to the spare position. I found 2 different 15”x8” aluminum wheels which fit over the 16” BMB calipers (Ultra 5051 inspired by @SAWB and ProComp 1069 which I have had for 14 years in 18x9 on my Dodge diesel tow rig).
EA9EF425-FE1E-44A3-AD57-D04B3A5B7DAF.jpeg

Both weighed about 9# less each than the steel D-windows I put on right after buying the Jeep 3 years ago (17.9# vs 26.8#). The ProComp backspace was 3.75” like the steelies and the Ultras are 3.65”. I liked them both so I did my 1st poll on this site, and the results were 22 to 11 in favor of the Ultras which I was leaning towards as well because they are machined with a clear coating vs polished. So Ultras it is:
4B54676B-90CA-4828-A4C0-811A70D7C2FE.jpeg

A test drive shows the previous subtle vibe at 60 mph was no longer evident and acceleration is maybe more brisk (due to 36# less rolling weight?).
 
Last edited:
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
Today, I planned to finish the last 500’ of a fence project. But, it started clouding up as I was finishing yesterday evening (pic below) and rained hard all night.
CB64E98D-DB36-4949-881D-2E2222CA3429.jpeg

The fence needs to happen so I can get cattle on the pasture but it’s valley bottom and still oddly wet for this time of year. Oh well, Jeep time! I got the fixed lower control arms out and in the pile with the old Rubicon Express adjustable uppers (all free for whom ever would like them):
BFDAF40E-5517-4D29-9BBA-6CC3E457AF89.jpeg

I set the Savvy lowers to match the old stock lowers in the rear and 16 1/4” eye to eye in the front matching what came out. The old front lowers are an aftermarket fixed set put on by a PO. They are about 1/4” longer the stock rears (and stock fronts?). Previously, I had no interference when cycling with those lengths. Hopefully, that will remain true with final pinion angles after the tuck.
2FE70418-8571-49EB-8D73-AB317952E461.jpeg


C91F3323-C295-4B55-ACEC-82B45E0B8D98.jpeg


B5EF4317-A649-4EC8-9C7E-D0CC8B1B5FD9.jpeg

Next, I re-set the pinion angles with the TJ on the ground (ride height) by loosening the UCA jam nuts, disconnecting one of the uppers on the axle side and adjusting the other upper by hand until I had the pinion angle I wanted. Then I brought the other upper to length and reattached it. It’s remarkable how easily you can adjust the Savvy double adjustable UCA length by hand with the Jeep on the ground when you consider the tension necessary on a ratchet strap to rotate an axle.

At ride height, L vs R front to rear axle measurements and LF to RR vs RF to LR measurements are each within 1/8” so pretty square (OK rectangular). I checked front and rear driveshaft and pinion angles with an angle finder before and after changing control arms. Caster is referenced to the ground and all others are referenced to the central frame:

Before Tummy Tuck (MML, T-case cable shifter, UCF skid, Savvy control arms):
FDS 7.5 degrees
F pinion 5.5
caster 8.5
RDS 16.2
R pinion 14.6

After Tuck:
FDS 8.5
F pinion 7
caster 7
RDS 20.1
R pinion 19.7

Surprisingly, prior to starting the tuck, I had no real driveline vibes with rear pinion/DS angle at 1.6 degrees and the front at 2 degrees. Regardless, I brought the rear within 1/2 degree. To preserve caster, I closed the gap less in front, to 1.5 degrees.

According to the local Jeep dealer‘s service department, for a 97 TJ, stock caster spec is 7 +/- 1 degree. When I originally put the uppers in a couple of weeks ago, I had about 1 degree less caster (6 degrees) and it felt a bit twitchy. So, I’m looking forward to trying this out.

Edit: 7 degrees caster feels good.
 
Last edited:
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
Back to cosmetics. I've been ignoring the bent bumper that came on the TJ for over 3 yrs. Time to deal with it:
7295CE41-A37F-4332-8158-7B6FD3C14A7B.jpeg
In keeping with the stock-ish and weight conscious build themes, a stubby stock bumper has been planned forever and today is finally that day.
Cut and test fit:
C3768E78-EC10-4454-9727-744D874067EF.jpeg

Weld up the holes:
7375D6D9-CDED-4835-9EBE-BF697E29D5DC.jpeg
Grind, polish and self etching prime:
25BBE126-606B-47E3-B7E4-3121C3B606E8.jpeg

Painted flat black with semi-flat tow hooks and re-installed with Mopar end caps held in place with Dorman 963-018D push retainers:
69C0B55B-9DBB-4AD6-8DFA-900916663FB2.jpeg


418AA806-2D19-409B-A653-59230D37B8CF.jpeg

Much better.
 
Last edited:
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
Next up is some hind end work. Mainly the rear axle but also the tank and bumper. I’m not happy with the rear trutrac and I have 4340 Cr moly shafts in my Dana 35 (my bad. I did this with my re-gear last year before I knew better). I want to keep the Dana 35 because it’s light, has good ground clearance and I’m building around 33s. So now I’m doing what I think I should’ve done last time: Super 35 w/ an e-locker. I also have ZJ rear discs to swap in and a Rock Jock rear track bar with their elevated bracket to replace the drums, stock track bar and PO’s elevated bracket without the forward lean needed for the rotated pinion an SYE kit. The axle is out. You can see where the stock track bar had been contacting the front of the stock skid:
1B71E9C4-2AB1-474B-BEAB-A9E225FEB9BA.jpeg

Here is the axle after pressure washing. The elevated track bar bracket and brace are PO mods:
685CE091-3E50-4746-A4C8-94073D2CE234.jpeg
The old track bar bracket was bolted and welded, but it came off fairly quickly. On quick inspection with a laser, it seems pretty straight.
B9022F76-082E-48E6-8D1A-89E72F67CEE9.jpeg

Next sand blasting. Looks better:
DE462AAC-FE0C-4FD7-9692-B6CB582FA7B4.jpeg

Then self etching primer and paint. The old shafts and drum brakes are also out:
12F9D4F7-3751-45F0-9DF1-458AB7307D2F.jpeg

Other issues include a failing fuel pump (actually the pressure regulator) and poor departure angle with my current hitch as well as hi-lift on the stock bumper.
02383BB7-B673-4290-AF3E-DB4B3C7A431D.jpeg

Today the tank came out and bumper and hitch came off. Needs cleaning under there, eh?
81A21725-8A55-4355-A706-34BEEBEACDE3.jpeg

I want to keep a 2” receiver and stock-ish appearance but improve the departure angle. I have some ideas I’m going to fool around with…
But cleaning/painting is next (the part I’m least looking forward to 😥).
 
  • Like
Reactions: P man and Wildman
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
Things are slowly moving along. The back half of the frame is stripped and the new tank is test fit:
60F9CE32-6C9C-4D8C-97D6-C928DFC6FFFF.jpeg


27401762-9F45-4856-9051-66685E91C45D.jpeg

The GenRight EXT tank is 19.5 gal. Ground clearance is about an inch higher than stock at the back and there is over 3 inches more room in the front for the axle.
8B11D45A-47BF-44E2-AD7C-156F387EC0EB.jpeg


2D22D846-D7FE-4F75-9C8A-2F429BD0400C.jpeg


022055D4-4120-49A0-9699-184588DDDC7D.jpeg

Eastwood internal frame coating is done after as thorough an internal cleaning as possible (frame drain holes between LCA mounts, multiple rinses, dry and blown out with compressed air):
A436562B-FE81-4790-A763-93508F2978C8.jpeg


84AFD679-8141-4F94-B994-65175B9F1F85.jpeg
Finally today, mask for paint tomorrow:
574FA70D-9BFD-4476-BE48-1B244770CBF0.jpeg
 
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
OK back at it again today. My wife is off with her horse and friends so I need to crank this out. About a thousand steps. I really don’t like painting.
First, the rust reformer (petroleum based wipe down then alcohol wipe down before that):
36743B3A-97C5-43B3-85D4-9300EC34CB6E.jpeg

All the grey stuff is rust after the chemical reaction. Then wipe down again with rag slightly damp with water. Then the 2K epoxy primer (this went on really nicely. Thx for the tip @Mike_H about the primer and the Eastwood internal frame coating being runny).
16227EFC-66B8-4F1A-A2DE-F120BD9E136A.jpeg
Finally, paint. I used Krylon semi-flat. This has some runs but it’s a frame:

7A4CDBF1-D280-4D9E-9D18-AE36DF981468.jpeg


683028BB-CD73-40A4-A764-2314D212CE69.jpeg

Here’s the products I used:
2C6A0756-9A60-4808-A734-874853780261.jpeg
 

Mike_H

Off-Camber is scary
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
9,259
Location
Grand Rapids, MI, United States
OK back at it again today. My wife is off with her horse and friends so I need to crank this out. About a thousand steps. I really don’t like painting.
First, the rust reformer (petroleum based wipe down then alcohol wipe down before that):
View attachment 350806
All the grey stuff is rust after the chemical reaction. Then wipe down again with rag slightly damp with water. Then the 2K epoxy primer (this went on really nicely. Thx for the tip @Mike_H about the primer and the Eastwood internal frame coating being runny).
View attachment 350807Finally, paint. I used Krylon semi-flat. This has some runs but it’s a frame:

View attachment 350809

View attachment 350808
Here’s the products I used:
View attachment 350814

Looks great! Nicely done
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wildman and Woodrow
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
This rear end project which I began roughly a month ago (and have been collecting parts for since last fall) is really several projects:

1) frame refresh (shown above)
2) tank and fuel pump
3) super 35
4) ZJ rear disc brake conversion
5) stock rear bumper mods
6) recovery point/jack update
All is not done, but the TJ is back in the daily driver pool 😀

To catch up on documentation, I’ll begin w/ the tank:
I‘ve never loved the stock tank. It’s in a vulnerable location and the ’97 skid is paper thin. Also, even w/ a Dana 35, real estate between the tank and differential is tight. Finally, it hangs down pretty far. Then my fuel pump (actually just the pressure regulator, I think) started to fail (long starts and the pressure at the rail bled down to less than 20 PSI in couple of minutes). So, even though it’s expensive option, I decided upon a Genright EXT Crawler tank which has another inch of ground clearance, about 5” more clearance to the differential and, with aluminum skid option, weighs similar to the factory tank and thin steel skid. I also got new Mopar fuel and fuel return lines from the local dealer. Significantly, a local auto parts store owner found a complete Bosch (OEM) fuel pump assembly after calling 8 states:
AB231EF2-58D2-4271-A36D-1CEFC4ADCB19.jpeg

part no. 67655 for the ‘97 TJ. Lucky find. Thx dude!
7BD9E2B8-5051-4D9E-9900-5B57C70A0A00.jpeg

Even though Genright said you might need longer lines, the pump position is roughly the same vs stock and stock line and electrical connectors fit perfectly:
68C051CF-42FF-4DA5-9DAA-73CA737FAFEE.jpeg

I also replaced the rusty filler neck and the rubber hose to the tank (China/Amazon and Dorman 573-032, respectively):
72C96710-D25F-4931-9EB6-F460057EE5C4.jpeg

Once the TJ was ready to drive, fuel pressure was stable at 54 PSI while running:
5B81F27C-B708-4C9B-AAF1-27A6C008FF56.jpeg

and holding at 50 PSI 20 minutes after shut down. Importantly, the long start issue is resolved 😀
4F49CF38-9E6A-4D16-B58D-211D6557751F.jpeg

Here’s the tank installed:
367F7687-D2F0-40CF-930E-750C8F3B37D7.jpeg


0ECAF9A5-D68A-4E69-8688-95218BA7AE86.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Wildman

Over Analyzer Extraordinaire...............
Staff Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2015
Messages
20,311
Location
In the hills of WA
This rear end project which I began roughly a month ago (and have been collecting parts for since last fall) is really several projects:

1) frame refresh (shown above)
2) tank and fuel pump
3) super 35
4) ZJ rear disc brake conversion
5) stock rear bumper mods
6) recovery point/jack update
All is not done, but the TJ is back in the daily driver pool 😀

To catch up on documentation, I’ll begin w/ the tank:
I‘ve never loved the stock tank. It’s in a vulnerable location and the ’97 skid is paper thin. Also, even w/ a Dana 35, real estate between the tank and differential is tight. Finally, it hangs down pretty far. Then my fuel pump (actually just the pressure regulator, I think) started to fail (long starts and the pressure at the rail bled down to less than 20 PSI in couple of minutes). So, even though it’s expensive option, I decided upon a Genright EXT Crawler tank which has another inch of ground clearance, about 5” more clearance to the differential and, with aluminum skid option, weighs similar to the factory tank and thin steel skid. I also got new Mopar fuel and fuel return lines from the local dealer. Significantly, a local auto parts store owner found a complete Bosch (OEM) fuel pump assembly after calling 8 states:
View attachment 355902
part no. 67655 for the ‘97 TJ. Lucky find. Thx dude!
View attachment 355901
Even though Genright said you might need longer lines, the pump position is roughly the same vs stock and stock line and electrical connectors fit perfectly:
View attachment 355903
I also replaced the rusty filler neck and the rubber hose to the tank (China and Dorma, respectively):
View attachment 355904
Once the TJ was ready to drive, fuel pressure was stable at 54 PSI while running
View attachment 355909
and holding at 50 PSI 20 minutes after shut down. Importantly, the llong start issue is resolved 😀
View attachment 355911
Here’s the tank installed:
View attachment 355912

View attachment 355913

With the better fuel pressure did you notice any difference in power with your stroker?

Jeep is really looking great. And this refresh makes the backend look good.
 
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
With the better fuel pressure did you notice any difference in power with your stroker?

Jeep is really looking great. And this refresh makes the backend look good.

Thanks. It’s nice to get some kudos after a bunch of work (but nothing close to your build which we are all anxiously awaiting rolling out under its own power😁).

No change in perceived power. But I didn’t expect any. The pressure when running was good before (about 51 PSI) but it would bleed off pressure quickly when shut down. That made me think it wasn’t the pump, but instead the pressure regulator which, as I understand it, is supposed to hold pressure in the line after shut down. I Initially thought of just replacing the regulator but it was half the price of the whole Bosch OEM assembly that I was lucky to get.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wildman

Wildman

Over Analyzer Extraordinaire...............
Staff Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2015
Messages
20,311
Location
In the hills of WA
Thanks. It’s nice to get some kudos after a bunch of work (but nothing close to your build which we are all anxiously awaiting rolling out under its own power😁).

No change in perceived power. But I didn’t expect any. The pressure when running was good before (about 51 PSI) but it would bleed off pressure quickly when shut down. That made me think it wasn’t the pump, but instead the pressure regulator which, as I understand it, is supposed to hold pressure in the line after shut down. I Initially thought of just replacing the regulator but it was half the price of the whole Bosch OEM assembly that I was lucky to get.

You've done a great job so you deserve the kudos. Mine will be back being worked on starting tomorrow. I'm ready for it to roll out under it's own power too.

Sorry I guess I'd read that wrong. I thought you'd said it had low pressure while running. And yes I'd have done what you did since the price is so close.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Woodrow
OP
Woodrow

Woodrow

TJ Enthusiast
Supporting Member
Joined
May 25, 2021
Messages
545
Location
Oregon
The next thing on the list is a big one; the axle. I was able to watch the mechanic at a shop local to me do the gear set up and eaton e-locker install in my axle housing which I brought to them out of the Jeep. I know the shop owner and really appreciated the opportunity to learn. This sort of thing is a pain in the ass for the mechanic and a liability for the shop so again, I thank them✌️. My Dana 35 had a factory limited slip (clutch style) w/ 3.08 gears swapped for a Eaton TruTrac and Yukon 4.11 last year. That set up had about 5-6K miles on it. I thought it was a waste to get new ring and pinion so I decided to use those gears with the Super 35 e-locker and Revolution 30 spline 1541H shafts (possibly a mistake?). Here is the pattern on the 5K gears before removal (lash was 0.008”):
Drive:

55841A74-E337-430C-8E83-8B42B650E8A2.jpeg

Coast:

83073957-1881-4FE1-ABAB-FDEA784E247A.jpeg

After all was pulled apart, we found a couple of things. First, the pinion and carrier races looked pitted:
D211F95C-613C-44B9-9571-ADC576BE3615.jpeg

‘Second, the inner pinion race wasn’t loose but neither was the interference fit as tight as expected upon removal or placing the new race. It also had what looked to be red locktite between the race and housing and what seemed to be punch impacts along the rim of the housing race seat (presumably to tighten the seat?).
D60B1CCC-BFB1-4234-8160-BD53AD469507.jpeg

At this point, I’m thinking “do I need a new housing?” But after talking it over with the mechanic and evaluating the fit of the new new race we decided to proceed.
Here’s the locking mechanism of the e-locker disassembled for inspection and lube:
16609BD6-343C-4089-86ED-6B8A26D7101B.jpeg

and reassembled with the ring and carrier bearings:
CBDD0595-7901-45D6-948D-BD0002552168.jpeg


AF82972A-443E-45FD-A8B1-6375712D2E95.jpeg

Note that super 35 carrier bearings have a larger inner diameter than standard Dana 35 carrier bearings due to the difference in diameter of 27 and 30 spline shafts. Here’s the new Revolution 30 spline shaft sitting next to an old stock 27 spline shaft. It looks to be the same diameter throughout except the inner section that engages the carrier:
997B815C-4A1A-4FF6-B606-21A8DEF6C5BE.jpeg
Next the pinion was installed. Preload about 18 in.lbs.
846B7963-57AE-4564-8BC6-E8D6D6CB073E.jpeg

Then then E-locker went in. Lash still 0.008”. A good pattern with used gears is tougher to define, I’m told. Here it is:
Drive:
3A99F029-F8B7-479F-B2EF-ECBD5F70A718.jpeg

Coast (apparently the one to use for judging set up with used gears):
55823CDF-1105-42D0-B10E-7738674F1CB0.jpeg

Then, in preparation for new shafts, we pressed in the new Koyo axle bearings and new seals Revolution Gear and Axle supplied.
F5C7BDA2-E438-40B1-A3C4-DF65F5777D3C.jpeg

Now I took the axle back home and welded on the Rock Jock elevated track bar mount. 50:50 here. 1 good weld and 1 bogger weld:
8064ED3D-4F10-422B-BDFE-8484290C70C9.jpeg

After some touch up paint, the axle went back on the TJ with a new Rock Jock (Currie) rear track bar, and my previously installed Savvy arms and Bilstein shocks. Also new were odds and ends like Delphi coil spring isolators, Daystar extended 5” bump stops with Crown cups.
C7A83093-6BB8-4124-9366-6173ADB9008B.jpeg

Then the ZJ disc backing plates, Revolution shafts, rotors and calipers went on.
66D4B352-F6FE-45F7-BFE1-8CE2FFE7A516.jpeg


7FD93330-9EB5-4B14-9734-9A9DD48EDAA8.jpeg

I had to fabricate the brake lines on the axle because the Classic Tubes kit stainless lines I got over the winter wouldn’t work with ZJ brakes and the Rock Jock track bar mount:
613F49E9-BC41-44A8-AEC7-4A46D54AE09F.jpeg


E523F9C6-2FFE-4862-AA99-52F53254CD0E.jpeg

Making the brake lines went better than I’d imagined (no leaks after a good bleed and pressure test!). Then I cycled the suspension. No interference but the elevated track bar mount comes close to the fuel lines🫣.
2C774FEA-28BC-4495-9AA1-23467DC9CEE8.jpeg
Getting close to driving now. e-brake hooked up, springs and sway bar in. Checked all bolt torques and lubed Johnny Joints. I got a new diff cover. It’s from Dana and it’s nodular iron. Bulkier and heavier than the stock stamped steel but burlier and gets rid of the rubber plug and the high fill plug allows for a more appropriate fill with the pinion rotated up vs stock. Room is not an issue with Currie bar and bracket and the stretch tank. Also looks cool (to me).
A5361455-D979-49A3-819B-2237A8770407.jpeg


80BD8DC6-0E47-4DC5-814D-0AA89D3049CE.jpeg

With the new hardware, the tailpipe needs a re-do (scheduled next week). In the mean time, I cut and turned it down before the axle and tack welded a hanger to the turn down. I filled the diff housing with conventional Valvoline 80/90wt gear oil, put the tires on and set the Jeep on the ground for the 1st time in a month. After a quick test drive confirming all seemed well, bath time😀
rear quarter pic.jpg


17DDB997-04CF-4F78-AC6C-D940EB6283F7.jpeg

In addition to the tailpipe, I need to wire up the e-locker and modify/reinstall my bumper and frame recovery point. But I’m happy with the progress.
 
Last edited: