Exhaust Jack

rosstfer

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Missouri
Does anyone have any real-world trail experience with exhaust jacks? Pros/Cons? I already have a Handyman jack, but i have been in some spot where using it would be out of the question. I explored the Harbor Freight off road jack, but space is an issue.

Anyone out there own/owned one and used it?
 
Is the jack primarily for changing tires or what? I would think it'd be hard to get a good/reliable enough seal around the exhaust for a jack though.
 
I'm not familiar with an "exhaust jack" do you have a picture of what you are referring to?
 
I'm not familiar with an "exhaust jack" do you have a picture of what you are referring to?

jack.jpg
 
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Yes, mainly for use on the trail. I tend to travel some pretty hairy trails.
My TJ was used to doing trails like this and I never carried anything more than the OE factory jack which was more than tall enough for its 35's. I stopped carrying my Hi-Lift trail jack back in 2003, it was never the best tool for the jobs I ever needed jacks for.



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My TJ was used to doing trails like this and I never carried anything more than the OE factory jack which was more than tall enough for its 35's. I stopped carrying my Hi-Lift trail jack back in 2003, it was never the best tool for the jobs I ever needed jacks for.



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The factory jack isn't an option in sandy or muddy areas without carrying blocks or something similar. i do still have and carry the factory jack and would use it appliable terrain.
 
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...I am wanting to find someone with real world experience with exhaust jacks.
You're not likely to find any here. I've never even seen them discussed on any of the many Jeep forums I've been on in the past 28 years. Maybe on an overlanding forum, they tend to like things like that more.
 
You're not likely to find any here. I've never even seen them discussed on any of the many Jeep forums I've been on in the past 28 years. Maybe on an overlanding forum, they tend to like things like that more.

I've seen them on the Australian offroaders youtubes.
 
I've seen them before, as well as watched a few videos.
The concept is cool, simple, and seems to 'work'.

They do fall short in terms of being 'safe' though. It's near impossible to create a sturdy/safe environment, when the vehicle is quite literally teetering on top of a balloon.

There's little to no stability involved, but I guess in short it WILL get the vehicle off the ground.
I'd never personally trust them enough to keep the vehicle off the ground or myself though.

It seems like it could be fairly handy in certain situations, if you understand/respect the extents of what it is designed to do.
 
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Does anyone have any real-world trail experience with exhaust jacks? Pros/Cons? I already have a Handyman jack, but i have been in some spot where using it would be out of the question. I explored the Harbor Freight off road jack, but space is an issue.

Anyone out there own/owned one and used it?

I own one, and have used exhaust jacks before. Here is the only pic I have of one in action (lying muddy to the side):

1708973096124.jpeg



Yes, one will relatively easily lift a stuck SUV. It’s a solution that works well in some situations.

A drawback in my experience, is that it’s difficult to keep the filler hose seated on the tailpipe, requiring constant pressure. Though once the “jack” is filled with gas, it stays inflated.

As to concerns on stability, I challenge you to find a stable lifting solution that works well in the mud. The HiLift is the best alternative, and those are unstable by design. And no, a bottle jack does not work in these situations.


If I regularly wheeled in heavily swamped areas, like some friends do back in Russia, I would likely carry one. I don’t really see a need for one elsewhere, and I don’t carry one anymore.
 
A drawback in my experience, is that it’s difficult to keep the filler hose seated on the tailpipe, requiring constant pressure.
That was my concern expressed above, I don't see that being an easy connection given the odd shapes of exhaust tips.

So did your exhaust jack get you out of that muck? If I were a betting man I'd guess it did not.
 
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I own one, and have used exhaust jacks before. Here is the only pic I have of one in action (lying muddy to the side):

View attachment 504492


Yes, one will relatively easily lift a stuck SUV. It’s a solution that works well in some situations.

A drawback in my experience, is that it’s difficult to keep the filler hose seated on the tailpipe, requiring constant pressure. Though once the “jack” is filled with gas, it stays inflated.

As to concerns on stability, I challenge you to find a stable lifting solution that works well in the mud. The HiLift is the best alternative, and those are unstable by design. And no, a bottle jack does not work in these situations.


If I regularly wheeled in heavily swamped areas, like some friends do back in Russia, I would likely carry one. I don’t really see a need for one elsewhere, and I don’t carry one anymore.

There's zero chance I'm wheeling in a place where I need rubber boots, let alone chest waders. F that.
 
That was my concern expressed above, I don't see that being an easy connection given the odd shapes of exhaust tips.

So did your exhaust jack get you out of that muck? If I were a betting man I'd guess it did not.

This particular time, it did not. I had bellied put to the point where all 4 tires were spinning in the water. It didn’t help that I was new at the time, and mistakenly believed more throttle = better.

I eventually was able to reposition the rear with the HiLift to be able to be winched out.
 
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