Why do some people not carry Hi-Lift jacks?

Mik

New Member
Supporting Member
Sep 10, 2018
16
Spring
It works great...just don't freak out like I did when that happens. I honestly had no clue what to do without another jack. One warning though...this sucker comes down quick, so watch yourself.
 

Drizit

TJ Addict
Feb 18, 2018
1,195
Canada
Mine gets used a few times a season. I keep it mounted inside the jeep so the pins don't rust and every spring before the first wheeling trip I hit all the moving parts with a bit of graphite spray. Now I have no use for farm jacks with fixed handles and stamped parts, they suck and are dangerous. The hi lift brand ones though are quite useful if given a healthy respect. My object lesson in that was a friend who was knocked out cold by one. Like a table saw, you should always be just a bit afraid of it every time you use it and you will probably be ok.

I have used it for on trail tire change ever since I got 35s (most people around here are on 35s or larger) I've used it to split wood, I've used it to pull or clamp things. It's limited only by your creativity. The handle makes a good wrench extension, or tie rod sleeve as well. Personally I wouldn't be without it on the trail... But it will kill you if you let it.

--
There must have been a time
when we could have said no.
 

Tomahawk

New Member
Jul 2, 2018
3
Wyoming
Have you ever had a hi-lift jack slip on the bumper? Mine did and slapped me on the side of my head and knocked me silly. Man that hurt. Have to be really careful with this jack.
 

jgaz

TJ Enthusiast
May 29, 2016
393
Peoria, AZ
My dad had a Ford Galaxie in the early 70s. The jack that came with it was a farm style type that's would attach to the steel bumpers. Does anyone else remember those?
Absolutely! ^^
I started driving in 1970 and don’t remember a car that didn’t use that type thru most of that decade.

You were taught to change a tire, safely, and you just accepted the possible danger.
Oh and BTW, flat tires were a lot more common back then.
 
I got my first Hi Lift in 1968 when I got my first Jeep, I was a junior in high school. It was bought then to be a winch of sorts as I couldn’t afford a real winch back then. I have since owned well over a dozen Jeeps and had a Hi Lift in every one of them. I use it as a tool, if I get hung up on something, if I need to get winched out backwards, or any other unforeseen issues where it is the best tool for the job (or quite possibly the only tool) I see and hear about people getting hurt with them and I have to say if this happens you’re not using it right. You have to have some common sense when you’re using any tool or you will get hurt. I too use a bottle jack to change tires, I never bought a Hi Lift for this purpose. So before you insult those of us that use them (and use them safely), please keep in mind that you may not have seen/heard/used them properly in the past.
 

jgaz

TJ Enthusiast
May 29, 2016
393
Peoria, AZ
Well, I can no longer say I’ve only used mine to pull fence posts.

I used it today to break the beads on four trailer tires that I changed by hand.
Piece a cake!
 
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ac_

zombicon
Supporting Member
Jun 15, 2017
4,081
AZ, United States
I always carry one with me on my Jeep. I am old school though. I have to admit I would probably use it to change a tire if I had too. I would Jack the car up and then set it down on something solid though. Growing up in the Pacific North Wet a lot to get me out of ruts especially if I didn't have a winch. I would jack my Jeep higher than the rut then push it over. I have done that many times. I have also used it as a porta-power.

Although anymore I don't go off road as much anymore, so mine is basically jewelry for now, but I wouldn't hesitate to use it however I have to get my Jeep back on the road or someone elses.

IMG-0432.JPG
 

WillM

Member
Apr 6, 2017
52
Tucker, GA, United States
Since this is my daily driver and I live in the city here in Atlanta, it's definitely one less thing I want to offer thieves who won't hesitate to break a window, cut a top of pry off something they think has value. The risk far outweighs any benefit. I stick with stock rated trails anyway.
 

Rapidan

New Member
Aug 20, 2018
10
Virginia
New guy here (though not new to Jeeps or 4wd), I appreciate all the knowledge. I've always carried a Hi-Lift, not for changing tires but for the reasons others mentioned above. Short distance winch, heavy duty clamp, "push off" jack for high centers or deep ruts, quick bodywork tool to pull fenders or bumpers out and get you home. Here in the Mid-Atlantic, with the rain we've had this year, I've used it twice this summer to move fallen trees from the trail when a vehicle pull couldn't do it. The Hi-Lift I currently have in my TJ has seen duty in my '79 Scout, '70 IH pickup, 96 XJ, '03 TJ, '06 Tacoma and now my '01 TJ. I've always found a way to mount it inside so it doesn't rust up or attract thieves. Most of the paint is off mine but it still works great after a couple of rebuilds. Back in the day, I couldn't afford a winch but the Hi-Lift pulled us out of a few jams. Now that I have a winch, I still tote the Hi-Lift - "Just in case".
 
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kandgo

New Member
Jun 14, 2016
10
I’ve carried one in our Jeeps since 81. Have used the jack no telling how many times. I also carry a bottle jack and a small hydraulic floor jack. Using a hi lift for tires normal or big tires is invaluable, just have to have a small chain and hook or a good strap to strap axle from all the swag in your Jeep. I’ve used the hi lift to break beads, pry out fenders, bend drag links etc etc the list can go on. But do agree that most are just for looks!
 

TehHeep

Member
Aug 20, 2018
92
Northeast
I keep my jack in my garage, really don't see the point in them with a good bottle jack, a winch, and a kinetic rope. Id never carry one around on the jeep all the time and id only mount one in/on the jeep if I planned on going wheeling that day.

A hi-lift is just a shitty way to recover; I would exhaust all other means first which are undoubtedly safer and quicker to begin with... I've put my hours in with them in all else fail situations but I don't care to by choice.

I do however use it around the house/property these days to pull fence posts, raise roofs/porches to replace supports, free up badly pinched chainsaw bars easily, etc...
 

TehHeep

Member
Aug 20, 2018
92
Northeast
This is why it's so great that we live in the good old U.S. of A. We have choices and can each do what we want to do with what ever tool we want and we don't have to justify it to anyone or make excuses why we did. We all have choices to do what ever we choose to. God Bless American! :)
Agreed. But I am always for a friendly debate on all techniques and practices; I am always willing to humor a better way of going about things.

It's what hones skills and evolves technique and equipment. There are a lot of unconventional points of view that make things safer or easier.

It's healthy to analyze and evaluate each other's load out and promote positive criticism.
 
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lowranger

TJ Expert
Supporting Member
Ride of the Month Winner
Feb 6, 2017
3,955
Kelseyville, CA, United States
Agreed. But I am always for a friendly debate on all techniques and practices; I am always willing to humor a better way of going about things.

It's what hones skills and evolves technique and equipment. There are a lot of unconventional points of view that make things safer or easier.

It's healthy to analyze and evaluate each other's load out and promote positive criticism.
Agree 100%! But no one should be made to feel stupid or "gee why do you have that" for what they do or what they have. If they've had it for years and have been using it for years and like it.....so be it.
Debates are great....if someone is asking questions and is not sure of a tool, Questions and answers are great.
 
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TehHeep

Member
Aug 20, 2018
92
Northeast
Agree 100%! But no one should be made to feel stupid or "gee why do you have that" for what they do or what they have. If they've had it for years and have been using it for years and like it.....so be it.
Debates are great....if someone is asking questions and is not sure of a tool, Questions and answers are great.
Agreed but I think intellectual and mature conversation goes beyond a basic Q&A session.

We should all be able to have an adult conversation as friends involved in the same hobby. As a person of your own you should be sure footed in your beliefs, but willing to listen and weigh the pros/cons of another's point of view without getting upset over it. I think if you are made to feel stupid over the internet by a total stranger you might have some more personal self confidence issues to work on, it's not the objective of most people in intellectual conversation.

I don't think I have seen anyone take a "gee why don't you have that" stance in a long time. There is a product that fits almost everyone's budget these days. Example: You can buy a winch for under $200.00.

Everyone operates under their own budget, and someone always has something bigger and better.

But I am not debating budget or feelings here, just touching on the want for more exchanged conversation rather than a mod list.

I am always willing to accept criticism that makes me smarter, my gear better, or my methodology more sound. It is how we push each other to be better at what we do.

At the end of the day I leave a conversation a bit smarter for absorbing the point of view that someone else has to give. This may or may not change the way I do things or what I equip myself with.

Too often people stick to there guns without diving into the logistics of it, it's great to breach that barrier and make good conversation out of it. It's great to actually be engaged in rich conversation rather than making a single isolated post, followed by the next, and the next...

Good talk sir.
 
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