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Just another locker and gear thread


SvtLdr

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Maybe he can, but he’s getting gears shipped in from overseas… if it doesn’t get setup right it’s not really a quick turn around(or cost effective) to order another set. It would be worth the money and hassle to let someone who does it for a living tackle the job than try to learn a new task he’s likely not going to use very often.
Your perspective is a valid way to look at it.

Have you ever taught yourself how to do something only for the satisfaction of learning?
 

suicideking

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Why the 4.88 ratio und the E-Locker?

For 33's, 4.56 and 4.88 aren't going to be much different. The best advice I've heard regarding gears: Figure out what gears you want, then, then go one lower (higher numerically). I don't see if you're running auto or manual, but the autos especially don't work as well with larger tires. So going to 4.88 would be best. Plus if you ever decide to move up to 35's, 4.88 will be better.

Suggest the E locker because it will be there when you need it, and will not have any negative effects when you don't need it. If you have a lot of wet/snow weather, a limited slip might be better.
 
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suicideking

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Your perspective is a valid way to look at it.

Have you ever taught yourself how to do something only for the satisfaction of learning?

Gears are not something you want to play with unless you're planning to do professional gear work. Especially if it's a pain to get the parts overseas. I've seen gear work done poorly. The best case scenario is they don't last as long (wrong preload etc). The worst case is they break, and kill your locker. I've also seen tcase work done by 'professional' shops where the tcase explodes on the freeway. This has happened to 2 people I know in the last couple years. In one, the tcase exploded and came through the floor.

When I got my Jeep, the gears were done wrong (preload). I had a reputable gear guy look at it. He fixed it as much as he could, but advised it would eventually fail. It failed on the trail (teeth broke off) and I had to get it towed. Then found out it broke my front ARB locker when that happened.

So if you want to play, that is sure an option. Though at your own risk of an expensive or life threatening failure. If I knew you and thought you knew what you're doing, I would still rather pay a professional to do it. Even if you offered to do the work for free.
 
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SvtLdr

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Gears are not something you want to play with unless you're planning to do professional gear work. Especially if it's a pain to get the parts overseas. I've seen gear work done poorly. The best case scenario is they don't last as long (wrong preload etc). The worst case is they break, and kill your locker. I've also seen tcase work done by 'professional' shops where the tcase explodes on the freeway. This has happened to 2 people I know in the last couple years. In one, the tcase exploded and came through the floor while driving on the freeway.

When I got my Jeep, the gears were done wrong (preload). I had a reputable gear guy look at it. He fixed it as much as he could, but advised it would eventually fail. It failed on the trail (teeth broke off) and I had to get it towed. Then found out it broke my front ARB locker when that happened.

So if you want to play, that is sure an option. Though at your own risk of an expensive or life threatening failure.
I disagree. I'm only trying to encourage others to not be fearful of the unknown. As with most things in life, everyone should do their own homework and make their own decisions based on the pros vs. cons. Yes, there's a lot at stake if you screw up the setup. Yes, for many folks this isn't a risk they're willing to take. That doesn't mean that someone who's interested in learning how can't figure it out and be successful. Just my opinion.
 

suicideking

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I disagree. I'm only trying to encourage others to not be fearful of the unknown. As with most things in life, everyone should do their own homework and make their own decisions based on the pros vs. cons. Yes, there's a lot at stake if you screw up the setup. Yes, for many folks this isn't a risk they're willing to take. That doesn't mean that someone who's interested in learning how can't figure it out and be successful. Just my opinion.

If someone really wants to learn it and will do it often in the future, sure proceed at your own risk. If you're just planning to do this once for your own rig, don't fucking bother. It's just not worth it.

I'd say do everything else yourself if you want to learn. Engine swap, suspension, transmission, etc. Just not gear work.

There's a reason Blaine doesn't do gear work. If he won't even do it, that says a lot.
 
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SvtLdr

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If someone really wants to learn it and will do it often in the future, sure proceed at your own risk. If you're just planning to do this once for your own rig, don't fucking bother. It's just not worth it.

I'd say do everything else yourself if you want to learn. Engine swap, suspension, transmission, etc. Just not gear work.

There's a reason Blaine doesn't do gear work. If he won't even do it, that says a lot.
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NashvilleTJ

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The part about not doing a regear yourself unless you are a pro & do it for a living. ‘Too many ways to go wrong.
Sorry Mud, but I disagree with that completely. That’s a gross generalization as many of us here do our own gears and are not pros. If you know how to do it, well, you know how to do it. If you don’t know how to do it, you can certainly learn.
 

TRE3TOP

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It ultimately comes down to what sort of value you place on your time and effort. For me outsourcing certain tasks is much better than frustrating with something for several days. Others will happily enjoy that challenge.

The whole concept of setting up gears would drive me insane. Assembling something only to find out you’re 1/10000th of an inch off, and you get to pull it apart and do it all again. No thanks, I want no part of that.
 

SvtLdr

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It ultimately comes down to what sort of value you place on your time and effort. For me outsourcing certain tasks is much better than frustrating with something for several days. Others will happily enjoy that challenge.

The whole concept of setting up gears would drive me insane. Assembling something only to find out you’re 1/10000th of an inch off, and you get to pull it apart and do it all again. No thanks, I want no part of that.
You're absolutely right. It's good that you recognize that before diving in.
 

NashvilleTJ

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It ultimately comes down to what sort of value you place on your time and effort. For me outsourcing certain tasks is much better than frustrating with something for several days. Others will happily enjoy that challenge.

The whole concept of setting up gears would drive me insane. Assembling something only to find out you’re 1/10000th of an inch off, and you get to pull it apart and do it all again. No thanks, I want no part of that.
Can't argue with that - setting gears is certainly a heavy lift. Nothing at all wrong with outsourcing that task.

But to clarify - you set up gears to the thou, not the tenth. If you are trying to set to the tenth, oh man no wonder it's tough!

:)
 

TRE3TOP

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Can't argue with that - setting gears is certainly a heavy lift. Nothing at all wrong with outsourcing that task.

But to clarify - you set up gears to the thou, not the tenth. If you are trying to set to the tenth, oh man no wonder it's tough!

:)
I thought they were ten thousandth of an inch shims? They are thousandth?
 

Jablinski

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I disagree. I'm only trying to encourage others to not be fearful of the unknown. As with most things in life, everyone should do their own homework and make their own decisions based on the pros vs. cons. Yes, there's a lot at stake if you screw up the setup. Yes, for many folks this isn't a risk they're willing to take. That doesn't mean that someone who's interested in learning how can't figure it out and be successful. Just my opinion.
I agree 100%.
Gear setup is definitely not horse whispering ,whatever that is. There is a lot of good knowledge available for this and I am willing to risk my hypothetical $10 on me and my own skill/fallacy against a shop that wants $1000. It's not that I feel I'd be charged unreasonable rates, it's that I am confident I can learn how... and that I can realize the satisfaction of knowing how to accomplish this (+ save that hypothetical $990).
If I fuck it up, I'll hire my own lawyer to sue myself 🤑
...Then my stubborn ass will start all over again