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Spring length information on Savvy 3" progressive springs

psrivats

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This is the information on Savvy 3" springs direct from Michael at Savvy. This information is for the CE-9133 model that they sell. I had trouble finding this information on this forum and others, so thought I would share it if anyone needs it.

My questions were:

1. What are the free lengths of the front and rear springs?
2. Are they very similar to the popular 4" springs apart than length? I well understand these are progressive springs and that the final height is going to be different on different jeeps.


His reply was:

3" Front Springs: 20.6"
3" Rear Springs: 17"

The front spring is harder to compare free lengths because they are different wire diameters and slightly different rates but are meant for lighter Jeeps which don't have a ton of weight on the front and sides added

The Rear is about 3/4-1" difference in height from 4" springs. They are very close in spec to the 4" Currie ones.
 

JMT

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@psrivats

I have different information for Savvy 3" and want to confirm or negate what I have.

Savvy 19498708106

Uncompressed Length Front: 20.25"
Spring Rate Front: 185
Uncompressed Length Rear: 15.75"
Spring Rate Rear: 185

That Rear length of 17" seems very long compared to other 3" springs. For example JKS are 15.125" and ProComp are 15.5"
 
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psrivats

psrivats

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@psrivats

I have different information for Savvy 3" and want to confirm or negate what I have.

Savvy 19498708106

Uncompressed Length Front: 20.25"
Spring Rate Front: 185
Uncompressed Length Rear: 15.75"
Spring Rate Rear: 185

That Rear length of 17" seems very long compared to other 3" springs. For example JKS are 15.125" and ProComp are 15.5"
Interesting. How old is this information? I wonder if the springs they use changed over time. I specifically asked Michael about what is available on the website today.

Also .. other than your old thread on this forum, I am not able to find any reference to the part # you shared above.
 
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jjvw

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@psrivats

I have different information for Savvy 3" and want to confirm or negate what I have.

Savvy 19498708106

Uncompressed Length Front: 20.25"
Spring Rate Front: 185
Uncompressed Length Rear: 15.75"
Spring Rate Rear: 185

...
That matches what I have listed for the old (really old) Currie 3". As far as I know, they aren't available any more. The spring rate is a very rough estimation and not an accurate way to describe those coils.

Savvy looks like a more useful set of 3" springs. The rears are really long for that ride height.
 
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JMT

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The rears are really long for that ride height.
I wonder if they are designed to maintain factory rake. 3" front and 4" rear.
How old is this information?
That is a good question. I do not know. It was hard to get. I talked to Katy probably a year or more ago and could not get the information that way. HAHA, surprise. I actually thing she really said, "I think the spring rate is 60." LOL. I found the information as @bobthetj03 and I tried to compile a database of 3" springs. It sounds obsolete. Glad you updated the information. I will no longer rely on my old data set.

It would be nice to know the spring rates. Did you happen to get them?
 

bobthetj03

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It's super secret mumbo jumbo information man! If they tell you their spring height and rate then they will have to kill you! Lol! Ugh! This is why I like OME springs. All the information you need is listed on their website. A simple linear spring, a few simple calculations, and you can get a good idea where you will sit in the clouds.
 
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jjvw

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...
That is a good question. I do not know. It was hard to get. I talked to Katy probably a year or more ago and could not get the information that way. HAHA, surprise. I actually thing she really said, "I think the spring rate is 60." LOL.
...
60lbs/in sounds like a plausible combined rate for a dual rate coil. Currie 4" rears are 79lb combined. A 3" that is almost as long as the Currie 4" would be pretty light.

It's useful information, but I have never taken the time to understand how to use it.
 
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psrivats

psrivats

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I wonder if they are designed to maintain factory rake. 3" front and 4" rear.
That may be a one of the explanations but I am not sure. From what Micheal said, I thought they were nearly 1" shorter than the 4"rear ones. Do you know what is the free length on the currie 4" rear spring? Maybe I will now email currie (or Rockjock 4x4 from where they now sell these springs) and find out.

It would be nice to know the spring rates. Did you happen to get them?
I did not ask since they are progressive springs .. whatever number they give be an "effective" number deduced from the weight of the rig they used and it won't apply 1-is-to-1 to other rigs.
 

kmas0n

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"It's useful information, but I have never taken the time to understand how to use it"

Exactly... I might not understand what is in my cheerios by reading the ingredient list... but I still want to know what's in it.

so

I'm going to thank Terraflex again.

anyways

I have always wondered how a coil spring can be progressive... with two springs (ie: coil-over), you get a combined rate until the lighter one bottoms out, then you get the second rate. with one spring you get a linear rate. It doesn't matter is part of the coil is firmer than the rest... you will get a combined linear rate until the lighter coils are removed from the rate... meaning they collapse and rest on other coils. Most of the "progressive" springs I've seen there is never coil bind until the whole thing is compressed, meaning that it was never progressive, just linear. It does make the spring longer, which is useful, but not a constantly changing spring rate like they want you to think.
 
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jjvw

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"It's useful information, but I have never taken the time to understand how to use it"

Exactly... I might not understand what is in my cheerios by reading the ingredient list... but I still want to know what's in it.

so

I'm going to thank Terraflex again.

anyways

I have always wondered how a coil spring can be progressive... with two springs (ie: coil-over), you get a combined rate until the lighter one bottoms out, then you get the second rate. with one spring you get a linear rate. It doesn't matter is part of the coil is firmer than the rest... you will get a combined linear rate until the lighter coils are removed from the rate... meaning they collapse and rest on other coils. Most of the "progressive" springs I've seen there is never coil bind until the whole thing is compressed, meaning that it was never progressive, just linear. It does make the spring longer, which is useful, but not a constantly changing spring rate like they want you to think.
Very few of these progressive springs are really progressive. Most are actually dual (triple) rate. Metalcloak is the most absurd example of this. My Currie rears have a small section that is pretty close to bind at ride height. Point being that a dual rate spring seems like it can be treated as linear rate while all the winds of the spring are active right up until a section reaches bind. The rate at which a section reaches bind before the other section is going to be determined by the rates and lengths of the sections.