Great deals on TJ parts on Amazon!

Looking for parts for your Jeep Wrangler TJ? Checkout the selection of TJ parts Amazon has to offer, many with 2-day Prime shipping!

Click the image below to browse TJ parts on Amazon.

Jeep Wrangler TJ Parts on Amazon

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Tox's dream trailer

Mrs Tox

Dashing through the Snow
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2020
Messages
41
Location
Northern WI
I figured you did all the research on the towing numbers, especially since you’re investing so much into something so nice. I was mainly courious on weather ya went SRW or DRW.

That would kinda suck if ya don’t get the truck before the trailer, I’m hoping it all works out for you.

The reason I’m torn between the open and closed deck ( I have lots of time to decide since if I do get one it won’t be for a couple years)
1. Weight, but I’ll admit I haven’t done much research in the difference
2. To me it seems easier to work on a rig in the open area but in bad weather that’s it would be totally opposite.
3. I kinda like the idea of also using that open deck to use as a “deck” when out. Grill off of it, setup a small table type thing. And be off the dirt but still be outside.

For what you have planned, being out for extended periods in all weather conditions I’d be more tempted to go the garage rout also, but I’m always second guessing myself, it’s a wonder how I get anything at all haha

Second-guessing yourself is the best thing you can do with a purchase like this. I can't recommend second-guessing yourself enough. The kindest thing you can do for yourself would be to second-guess yourself a million times over so that you truly know what you want and what's best for you.

1. Weight is such an important concern not just in taking care of your trailer and tow vehicle but in your safety on the road too. Mr. Tox and I actually made a Google Sheets document where we listed absolutely everything we thought we'd put in the trailer. And I mean every teensy-weensy detail from tinfoil to towels to tools to work equipment to clothes and extra people that might be coming along. We guessed the weight of absolutely everything going in our trailer so we would know what our maximum weight could potentially be and then planned accordingly. The peace of mind from us taking the time to do this is worth every aggravation we'll hopefully never have to deal with on the road because we overloaded our trailer.

2. "To me it seems easier to work on a rig in the open area but in bad weather that’s it would be totally opposite." This comes down to personal preference and we took the time to really think about this too. Only you know what's best for you. What is came down to for us was wanting to protect everything from the elements in transit. The last time Mr. Tox brought his LJ in for exhaust work in the dead of winter, the ratchet straps had frozen solid inches-of-ice-deep and it was caked in salt. It wasn't fun to unload. Hot chocolate can only help so much, you know?

3. "I kinda like the idea of also using that open deck to use as a “deck” when out. Grill off of it, setup a small table type thing. And be off the dirt but still be outside." I love this idea. Our version of this was to have a massive screen on the back garage door you can pull down so that if it's raining or the bugs are bad, you can be enclosed in the garage and enjoy the outdoors but not be in it. Otherwise, we're just planning on being outside. We'll probably end up getting a fold-down table like you mentioned that can be our outdoor kitchen and we're thinking of a blackstone griddle at the moment. We smoke a lot at home and I kind of like the idea of having smoking being something we do at home and maybe the griddle being our away-from-home thing. Jury's still out on that one but I've heard good things about those blackstone griddles.

Honestly, there's so many options out there and I think besides knowing your weight so you know your limitations, the best thing you can do is know all of the options that are available so you can go from there.

There's so many questions. Open deck or enclosed? Also, are you boondocking or planning on staying at campgrounds? How are you going to have heat? Water? AC? How much of those things do you need?

Have fun second-guessing everything. LOL. :)
 
Last edited:

Mumblewood

TJ Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Messages
864
Location
Renton Wa
Second-guessing yourself is the best thing you can do with a purchase like this. I can't recommend second-guessing yourself enough. The kindest thing you can do for yourself would be to second-guess yourself a million times over so that you truly know what you want and what's best for you.

1. Weight is such an important concern not just in taking care of your trailer and tow vehicle but in your safety on the road too. Mr. Tox and I actually made a Google Sheets document where we listed absolutely everything we thought we'd put in the trailer. And I mean every teensy-weensy detail from tinfoil to towels to tools to work equipment to clothes and extra people that might be coming along. We guessed the weight of absolutely everything going in our trailer so we would know what our maximum weight could potentially be and then planned accordingly. The peace of mind from us taking the time to do this is worth every aggravation we'll hopefully never have to deal with on the road because we overloaded our trailer.

2. "To me it seems easier to work on a rig in the open area but in bad weather that’s it would be totally opposite." This comes down to personal preference and we took the time to really think about this too. Only you know what's best for you. What is came down to for us was wanting to protect everything from the elements in transit. The last time Mr. Tox brought his LJ in for exhaust work in the dead of winter, the ratchet straps had frozen solid inches-of-ice-deep and it was caked in salt. It wasn't fun to unload. Hot chocolate can only help so much, you know?

3. "I kinda like the idea of also using that open deck to use as a “deck” when out. Grill off of it, setup a small table type thing. And be off the dirt but still be outside." I love this idea. Our version of this was to have a massive screen on the back garage door you can pull down so that if it's raining or the bugs are bad, you can be enclosed in the garage and enjoy the outdoors but not be in it. Otherwise, we're just planning on being outside. We'll probably end up getting a fold-down table like you mentioned that can be our outdoor kitchen and we're thinking of a blackstone griddle at the moment. We smoke a lot at home and I kind of like the idea of having smoking being something we do at home and maybe the griddle being our away-from-home thing. Jury's still out on that one but I've heard good things about those blackstone griddles.

Honestly, there's so many options out there and I think besides knowing your weight so you know your limitations, the best thing you can do is know all of the options that are available so you can go from there.

There's so many questions. Open deck or enclosed? Also, are you boondocking or planning on staying at campgrounds? How are you going to have heat? Water? AC? How much of those things do you need?

Have fun second-guessing everything. LOL. :)

Yeah, right now all options ore still on the table, I’m not even sure if I’ll change up what I’m doing now, but I’ve thought about going the rout your going, motorhome and enclosed trailer, or I’ve even tossed around ramp truck and travel trailer. The only thing I know for sure is that no matter what I do I’ll always keep my flatbed trailer. It comes in handy for more than just towing my jeep, and since I do a decent amount of day trips, it’s just fast and easy to load.

Right now it’s usually just me and my son since my wife is not into the jeepin much, but dose like to take camping trips a couple times a year, and this time she’s not invested in whatever I want to do since we have the Mexico house now, she’s rather go down there and lounge in the pool or hit the beach.

Thanks for the reply
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mrs Tox
OP
toximus

toximus

Life doesn't wait
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2018
Messages
7,366
Location
Northern WI
2. To me it seems easier to work on a rig in the open area but in bad weather that’s it would be totally opposite.

For any sort of major work on a Jeep, I plan to work outside under the awning. If the ground is messy I'll lay out a tarp first. I am looking forward to being able to bring parts inside to work on during cold or hot days.

3. I kinda like the idea of also using that open deck to use as a “deck” when out. Grill off of it, setup a small table type thing. And be off the dirt but still be outside.

On the flip side, you can use an enclosed as a mud room or dining/hangout area like Mrs Tox mentioned. Add a few windows on each wall if you'd like.

or I’ve even tossed around ramp truck

I thought about a ramp truck too. What swayed me against is that they all seem to be significantly older unless you go with a tow truck.

Definitely a lot of options available and none seem to be one size fits all.
 
  • USA Proud
Reactions: RINC

RINC

Beefy! I Loves Me Some Arizona.
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2020
Messages
4,260
Location
A Sunny Place For Shady People. Laveen, AZ
For any sort of major work on a Jeep, I plan to work outside under the awning. If the ground is messy I'll lay out a tarp first. I am looking forward to being able to bring parts inside to work on during cold or hot days.



On the flip side, you can use an enclosed as a mud room or dining/hangout area like Mrs Tox mentioned. Add a few windows on each wall if you'd like.



I thought about a ramp truck too. What swayed me against is that they all seem to be significantly older unless you go with a tow truck.

Definitely a lot of options available and none seem to be one size fits all.

Did I hear ramp truck?!!
 

Apparition

Moab June 11-16th 2023
Supporting Member
Ride of the Month Winner
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
26,500
Location
Twin Cities, MN
Did I hear ramp truck?!!
tumblr_p50kp29x0d1u7c3dro2_400.gif
 
  • Love
  • USA Proud
Reactions: IPerkWVU and RINC

Apparition

Moab June 11-16th 2023
Supporting Member
Ride of the Month Winner
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
26,500
Location
Twin Cities, MN
Diesel 2022 F350 single rear wheel. All of the numbers I've been told should mean that it's 100% legal and safe. Anything older than a 2020 I don't think would be legal.

I'm hoping the truck arrives before the trailer is ready for pick up.

What are the reasons you're interested in the open deck?

Are you going to add air bags?
 

TurboTJ

TJ Addict
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
1,009
Location
Walnut Creek, CA
1. Weight is such an important concern not just in taking care of your trailer and tow vehicle but in your safety on the road too. Mr. Tox and I actually made a Google Sheets document where we listed absolutely everything we thought we'd put in the trailer. And I mean every teensy-weensy detail from tinfoil to towels to tools to work equipment to clothes and extra people that might be coming along. We guessed the weight of absolutely everything going in our trailer so we would know what our maximum weight could potentially be and then planned accordingly. The peace of mind from us taking the time to do this is worth every aggravation we'll hopefully never have to deal with on the road because we overloaded our trailer.

It will still weigh more than you planned, guaranteed.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike_H

Mike_H

Buzz, buzz goes the driveshaft
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
9,542
Location
Grand Rapids, MI, United States
Second-guessing yourself is the best thing you can do with a purchase like this. I can't recommend second-guessing yourself enough. The kindest thing you can do for yourself would be to second-guess yourself a million times over so that you truly know what you want and what's best for you.

1. Weight is such an important concern not just in taking care of your trailer and tow vehicle but in your safety on the road too. Mr. Tox and I actually made a Google Sheets document where we listed absolutely everything we thought we'd put in the trailer. And I mean every teensy-weensy detail from tinfoil to towels to tools to work equipment to clothes and extra people that might be coming along. We guessed the weight of absolutely everything going in our trailer so we would know what our maximum weight could potentially be and then planned accordingly. The peace of mind from us taking the time to do this is worth every aggravation we'll hopefully never have to deal with on the road because we overloaded our trailer.

2. "To me it seems easier to work on a rig in the open area but in bad weather that’s it would be totally opposite." This comes down to personal preference and we took the time to really think about this too. Only you know what's best for you. What is came down to for us was wanting to protect everything from the elements in transit. The last time Mr. Tox brought his LJ in for exhaust work in the dead of winter, the ratchet straps had frozen solid inches-of-ice-deep and it was caked in salt. It wasn't fun to unload. Hot chocolate can only help so much, you know?

3. "I kinda like the idea of also using that open deck to use as a “deck” when out. Grill off of it, setup a small table type thing. And be off the dirt but still be outside." I love this idea. Our version of this was to have a massive screen on the back garage door you can pull down so that if it's raining or the bugs are bad, you can be enclosed in the garage and enjoy the outdoors but not be in it. Otherwise, we're just planning on being outside. We'll probably end up getting a fold-down table like you mentioned that can be our outdoor kitchen and we're thinking of a blackstone griddle at the moment. We smoke a lot at home and I kind of like the idea of having smoking being something we do at home and maybe the griddle being our away-from-home thing. Jury's still out on that one but I've heard good things about those blackstone griddles.

Honestly, there's so many options out there and I think besides knowing your weight so you know your limitations, the best thing you can do is know all of the options that are available so you can go from there.

There's so many questions. Open deck or enclosed? Also, are you boondocking or planning on staying at campgrounds? How are you going to have heat? Water? AC? How much of those things do you need?

Have fun second-guessing everything. LOL. :)

This is a great post. I'm FINALLY through enough of the mechanical stuff on my class A that I can start thinking about the interior updates and upgrades.

Now that we've been using the thing for a couple years, we know what we do and don't do with it. We cook outside, almost exclusively (highly recommmend a blackstone, BTW). So, the oven? Yeah, no use. We don't really boondock (or haven't yet) so we usually have shore power available. I've found that the waste tanks are too small (unbalanced from the fresh supply). We actually have more storage than we need and I'm a tall guy...so some of the cabinets we have gotta get reconfigured so I stop bashing my head on them. We don't really have a nice place to sit and relax, inside, only a dinette that forms into an uncomfortable chaise lounge. So a couch of some sort is on the list. The fridge is a three mode absorbtion type. Once its cold, its fine, but getting it there without shore power is tough. I'd like a DC compressor style, so I can eliminate another hole in the roof, it will work while travelling (currently my 12V mode doesn't work and using LP with an open flame while driving scares me), its MUCH quicker, and not nearly so sensitive to level.

I'm pretty convinced the interior is going to get gutted at this point, so I'm looking at what I should do while its apart...and second guessing EVERYTHING. Do I stay "tried and true" and run the same thing as RV's have since they began making them? Big, noisy generator, Big Shore power line, and a couple batteries to hold up to limited time without power? Or, do I get creative and design a LiPo system with solar and High Efficiency DC appliances with higher voltage batteries, Mini-splits for climate control, remove the LP tank (or reduce to a 20 lb from a 60 lb), etc. I can also do something hybrid (like LiPo Batteries, smaller gen, Newer, more efficient appliances, etc). Option 1 is least expensive, but I don't benefit much from the huge leaps in technology over the last 45 years. Option 2, presents a neat opportunity to learn some things. It definitely has "cool" factor as well. It will be VERY expensive however, and if its not done properly, will make us hate everything about the camping experience. Option 3 is probably the safest bet and will probably be the path I walk. Improve the efficiency of the appliances I have (and make them work better by sealing the coach properly) and increase capacity and DoD of the batteries to reduce, not eliminate the need for shore power. I still need to convince the wife that we don't need to make a thanksgiving dinner for the whole campground each night we're camping (lol).

Every time I have it planned out in my mind, I think about it some more and start over. When confronted with spending the amount of time (which is more important to me than money) this project will suck up...I need to make sure I hit it out of the part, first swing, first pitch. LOTS of thought and discussion. I'm actually working on a CAD model of the interior, so I can work up different floor plans and what is actually possible.
 
OP
toximus

toximus

Life doesn't wait
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2018
Messages
7,366
Location
Northern WI
Which brand is that? Has that Cummins color.

Cummins/Onan but with a Kubota engine.

We're expecting to boondock more than stay at campgrounds, so we decided on a diesel generator to share the same fuel as the truck and they're supposed to be quieter. It also requires less frequent maintenance and sips fuel compared to gasoline which will mean more time doing what we enjoy. Since we'll have pets staying in the trailer alone at times having an on board gen seems like the more reliable option so a well meaning camper doesn't turn it off while we aren't there. If I could expect it to always be sunny where we camp I'd have strongly looked into more batteries and more solar panels instead.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LarryTJ

AMS417

"The Ayatollah of rock and rolla"
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2020
Messages
1,888
Location
Springfield MO
If things get a little crazy at the all you can eat buffet, thankfully we have a safety margin of 2,000lbs on top of our estimate.

I just weighed my little trailer for the first time since I finished it. Loaded with water and gear its 1,160 pounds heavier than I would have guessed weighing 7,660. The truck is 7,680 with a full tank and me in the driver seat. I am also only 30 pounds below my rear axle rating of 6,390 with just the trailer and gear. She is way nose heavy. Adding the Jeep shifts the load to the trailer axles and off the truck. I plan to weigh again with the Jeep on soon and see how things move around. Trailer has 3x 5,200 axles so if I can get the Jeep in the right spot we should have lots of room by axle, and combined.

1661895742499.png
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wildman and toximus