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What do you do if you're stopped on a hill and your Jeep can't make it?

garet f

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When going up a steep hill and your jeep cannot make it you come to a stop. What do you do if you start rolling backwards? If you hit the brakes the front will lock in your most likely flip. What should you do
 

jjvw

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What does steep mean? Why would stopping make the Jeep flip?
 

jodomcfrodo

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Depends on the situation. The couple times I've had to back down a hill, I just put it in reverse, slowly let out the clutch and modulate the brake until I'm rolling backwards in a way I'm comfortable with. I think you are a bit too concerned about flipping backwards. Experience is really the only way to answer this question.
 
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-T.

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Modulate the brakes so that the front doesn't lock? "Pump them brakes kid!" :)
It's not the most pleasant experience in the world to have to back down a hill on a slippery surface, but it is manageable. People behind you should not be starting a climb until they are sure you are clear, and they need to leave room for you to come back down. Generally, holding your brakes will hold you on a hill fine, then you can release carefully and let it begin to roll back. Sometimes it is a matter of backing a little and stopping, then backing a little more and stopping, but if you begin to slide, you've got to modulate the brakes just like when you are trying to stop on ice so that you can maintain control. If you really begin to slide, sometimes you just have to let it roll a bit faster that you would like, but you have to let the front wheels keep turning to maintain control.
 
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JMT

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It has happened to me. Instinct will take over unless you practice. Not all instinct is good. Hopefully the front end is not starting to go sideways, if so, turn the opposite way to straighten it out. Be easy on the brakes and just let it come as straight down as possible. IF you are not comfortable trying the climb, don't.
 

Robin Down

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I was in a situation on a steep climb, on rocks, when my rear passenger tire slipped off the rock and down into a deep hole, which caused the weight to shift and the front of my Jeep to rise in the air. I nearly flipped backward and had literally a second to make a decision what to do.

First thing I did was to let off the gas and apply the brake, but my momentum had pushed the nose up dangerously high. I then shifted into reverse (with my automatic, from 1st gear which is 4 clicks 'up' to get to reverse). I then gave a small amount of throttle to bring the nose down, but making sure to keep one foot on the brake to keep from rolling backward down the hill. Once my front tires touched the ground I had to maneuver the vehicle backward carefully to get to a more stable spot. It was all done in a few seconds and I had prevented a roll-over, but just barely.

If I was in a vehicle with manual transmission, I could have simply put in the clutch and applied a little brake and gravity would have brought my nose down a little sooner. With an automatic you need to plan ahead how many clicks you might need to go up to get to neutral or reverse. This is something you can practice (on flat ground) if you want to memorize the position of the shifter and the shift pattern to get you into the gear you want.

It was all caught on video, and pictures, and one picture was published in 4 Wheeler magazine as a permanent reminder to be careful, keep your cool and plan ahead!

102282


The woman in the photo holding my tire was taken after I had stablized the vehicle - but I had to wait for her to let go so I could bring my wheels back down. DON'T DO THIS!!
 

tworley

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Ive had some interesting (scary) moments, but never once has the front end come up just end over end. My brakes have held me just fine. It can be an odd feeling when the front end wants to come up, chances are though that you are not in any real, immediate danger.

Awesome photo @Robin Down
 
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AndyG

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I once failed to make a hill, covered in snow /ice,in a ton and half flatbed pulling a dump trailer .

Backing down a hill is one thing .

Sliding down one with a trailer and houses below you on either side of the road is another.

To answer the question , carefully, any way I could .
 

AndyG

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I was in a situation on a steep climb, on rocks, when my rear passenger tire slipped off the rock and down into a deep hole, which caused the weight to shift and the front of my Jeep to rise in the air. I nearly flipped backward and had literally a second to make a decision what to do.

First thing I did was to let off the gas and apply the brake, but my momentum had pushed the nose up dangerously high. I then shifted into reverse (with my automatic, from 1st gear which is 4 clicks 'up' to get to reverse). I then gave a small amount of throttle to bring the nose down, but making sure to keep one foot on the brake to keep from rolling backward down the hill. Once my front tires touched the ground I had to maneuver the vehicle backward carefully to get to a more stable spot. It was all done in a few seconds and I had prevented a roll-over, but just barely.

If I was in a vehicle with manual transmission, I could have simply put in the clutch and applied a little brake and gravity would have brought my nose down a little sooner. With an automatic you need to plan ahead how many clicks you might need to go up to get to neutral or reverse. This is something you can practice (on flat ground) if you want to memorize the position of the shifter and the shift pattern to get you into the gear you want.

It was all caught on video, and pictures, and one picture was published in 4 Wheeler magazine as a permanent reminder to be careful, keep your cool and plan ahead!

View attachment 102282

The woman in the photo holding my tire was taken after I had stablized the vehicle - but I had to wait for her to let go so I could bring my wheels back down. DON'T DO THIS!!
Gnarly.
 

jjvw

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I once failed to make a hill, covered in snow /ice,in a ton and half flatbed pulling a dump trailer .

Backing down a hill is one thing .

Sliding down one with a trailer and houses below you on either side of the road is another.

To answer the question , carefully, any way I could .
Sliding a fully loaded 26ft box truck backwards down a ice covered mountain switch back road is one of the scariest things I have had to do. I can't imagine doing the same with a heavy trailer.
 

AndyG

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Sliding a fully loaded 26ft box truck backwards down a ice covered mountain switch back road is one of the scariest things I have had to do. I can't imagine doing the same with a heavy trailer.
It was horrible , and of course , when you freak out , everything about backing a trailer goes out the window. I got pretty lucky . A curb , tree and fence caught me.
 
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wildbill

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Put it in reverse and pump the break slowly to control your speed. Neutral is not your friend. Use the engine's compression to help control your decent. If your front tires go up, a little (and I mean a little) gas will help bring them down.
 
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