Woodrow's 97 Green TJ Moderate Build

I was talking to a guy named Keith in sales at GenRight today ordering a universal crossmember kit and elevated body mounts. He said he recommended their

Atlas Transfer Case Support Ring Kit​

View attachment 495863
He said he cracked two 4 speed transmissions on his CJ before he put this on. I didn't jump on it but wondered what anyone else thought? Obviously more money and time but also probably driveline vibrations to chassis. Here is the CJ he uses it on:
View attachment 495864

From what I understand Blaine does not feel that the added support is required. It's been discussed in a few threads on transfer cases and builds but I don't remember where or when. Not trying to quote him but I seem to remember somethings about vibrations if things aren't lined up dead on.


Of course since I'm different & have a 150lbs + t-case I have the second crossmember and a support bracket for my STaK's.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Woodrow
I made a little progress on the Atlas/higher tuck project:
First, I finally finished cutting out the internal brace on the 1” drop UCF skid @Alex01 loaned me (with his approval, of course). That was a bit of work. Using a cutting wheel for the 1/2” thick welds, I had trouble with it binding. As a result, I blew up my Dewalt corded grinder (it actually caught on fire 🔥). But I eventually got it done with my battery powered grinder.

IMG_6068.jpeg

Next, I marked the tub where clearance was needed and pulled the Atlas back out. You can see where the front top of the Atlas, just above the front output yoke, contacts the tub. That’s just behind the T-case linkage bracket holes on the driver’s side of the tunnel.
IMG_6069.jpeg

I debated about how to massage the sheet metal. Instead of the BFH method, I used a wood block on a pole jack. That worked well and seemed pretty controlled. It also didn’t damage the paint/under coating significantly. With the Atlas back in, clocked at 7 degrees down, I’ve got just over 1/2” minimum clearance above and below with the 1" drop skid in place. That previous point of contact is now nicely up off the case.
IMG_6071.jpeg


IMG_6075.jpeg


IMG_6076.jpeg

I will replace some of the left sided lower bolts with recessed, flat head phillips screws for a little more clearance like @mrblaine has done. Thanks to @Rickyd & @Apparition for that tip. Next, I’ll work on the Genright crossmember to support the driveline before I finish the shifters.
 
Last edited:
I made a little progress on the Atlas/higher tuck project:
First, I finally finished cutting out the internal brace on the 1” drop UCF skid @Alex01 loaned me (with his approval, of course). That was a bit of work. Using a cutting wheel for the 1/2” thick welds, I had trouble with it binding. As a result, I blew up my Dewalt corded grinder (it actually caught on fire 🔥). But I eventually got it done with my battery powered grinder.

View attachment 498627
Next, I marked the tub where clearance was needed and pulled the Atlas back out. You can see where the front top of the Atlas, just above the front output yoke, contacts the tub. That’s just behind the T-case linkage bracket holes on the driver’s side of the tunnel.
View attachment 498628
I debated about how to massage the sheet metal. Instead of the BFH method, I used a wood block on a pole jack. That worked well and seemed pretty controlled. It also didn’t damage the paint/under coating significantly. With the Atlas back in, clocked at 7 degrees down, I’ve got just over 1/2” minimum clearance above and below with the 1’ drop skid in place. That previous point of contact is now nicely up off the case.
View attachment 498631

View attachment 498629

View attachment 498630
I will replace some of the left sided lower bolts with recessed, flat head phillips screws for a little more clearance like @mrblaine has done. Thanks to @Rickyd & @Apparition for that tip. Next, I’ll work on the Genright crossmember to support the driveline before I finish the shifters.

Looks great!!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Woodrow
I still have work to do to finish up the atlas, but I want to be able to set the Jeep on its tires for the tunnel mods needed for the shifter. I sold my 33” tires last week and the new 35s and rims have been laying around taking up space. So its time to get them mounted. I have Coyote beadlocks to install with them. Tire shops won’t do those so I’m on my own. I’ve done many bike tires. Same principle, right? Also, pneumatic beadlocks exist in the mountain bike world. In fact, the success of those devices for downhill mountain biking is what started my interest in a similar system for the Jeep. I’ll admit the idea of manually mounting 35” tires was daunting. I watched the video on the Coyote site a few times(https://www.coyoteents.com/installing-coyote-boltless-beadlocks-video/). @jjvw and @mrblaine were both helpful in suggesting tools. I didn’t need to dismount the old tires (had a shop do that). There is some prep work for both the rims and new tires. My rims have some rock rash so I needed to smooth that out to remove sharp edges and to make them look nicer.
IMG_6096.jpeg

I used a paint stripping wheel on my grinder. That worked very nicely on the aluminum.
IMG_6097.jpeg

The tires also need prep (no pics-forgot). You need to smooth the inner edge of the bead which apparently can be sharp enough to cut the inner tube. Coyote recommends using a small pneumatic angle grinder with a 40 grit 2” wheel. I have that but my 2” wheel was shot so I used a 36 grit flap disc on my 4.5” grinder. It worked but I don’t recommend it. The flap disc gets a lot of traction on the rubber and it can really bounce around (dangerous). Then you need to vacuum all the rubber dust out of the tire.

Next, I spread everything out with the Coyote video on my ipad.
IMG_6100.jpeg

Now more wheel prep. The stickers need to come off and I cut out the old valve stem.
IMG_6101.jpeg


IMG_6102.jpeg

Then you need to drill a second valve hole in the rim for the inner (high pressure) chamber. It seems counterintuitive, but Coyote recommends this hole be within 6-8” of the other valve hole. The reason is the extra weight of the valves helps counter balance the overlapped and sewn together area of the polyester webbing is which makes up the “tread” of the inner tire. Therefore, that is clocked opposite the valve holes. Drilling the 5/16” hole in your rim seems like commitment😬.
IMG_6103.jpeg

The hole needs to be chamfered on both sides (just a bit) to create a sealing surface for the rubber o-rings.

Now, the inner tube and inner tire get powdered to allow the tube to move freely against the inner tire which helps to prevent damage/leaks. Coyote provides plenty of powder.
IMG_6104.jpeg

OK. Time to start mounting the tire. I worried the most about this, but it actually went very smoothly. Coyote recommends windex, rather than soap solution to lube the bead because the tire is less prone to slip when re wetted in the wild. The front face of the rim goes through the inside bead first. Coyote’s instructions aren’t too specific here but I quickly figured out that the end of my spoons with the little round bar welded on transversely worked perfectly.
IMG_6105.jpeg

The specific tire spoons/levers that I bought were OTC 5735-35G. They are a little spendy but excellent. They are double ended with different tools at either end and 35” long for good leverage.
IMG_6119.jpeg

Once the first bead is on the rim, you flip it over.
IMG_6106.jpeg
Then you sequentially, by hand, put the inside of the inner tire on and the inner tube in, securing the inner tube valve in the new hole with 2 o-rings, washer and a nut. Laying the tube in flat and free of wrinkles or folds and being sure it is NOT under either bead of the inner tire are important.
IMG_6107.jpeg

The new valve for the outer tire has a channel which extends up between the inner and outer tires to allow air to move from the original valve into the outer (low pressure) chamber.

IMG_6108.jpeg


IMG_6109.jpeg

Once that is in place and secured with its included seal plus washer and nut, the second bead of the inner is pushed onto the rim. Note that the inner tube and inner tire are pushed on by hand fairly easily.

Now, its time to mount the 2nd bead of the outer tire. Other than the tire irons, the only additional tool I bought was the vice grip device which clamps onto the rim and holds the 2nd bead down in the channel. I don’t think this was absolutely necessary but it sure was a helpful 3rd hand when doing this alone. Coyote says start just past the outer valve stem (the one with the channel) and carefully work your way around.
IMG_6110.jpeg


IMG_6111.jpeg

Note, now I’m using the opposite end of the tool. The little nub gently keeps the tire bead from sliding up as I bring it around. This part took the most amount of force and I was also very careful positioning the spoons to prevent damaging the tube or inner tire.
IMG_6113.jpeg

Upon reaching the outer valve, I was again careful to prevent damaging the channel as the bead dropped over.
IMG_6114.jpeg

Next, you put 10 psi into the inner chamber to move the outer tire beads out against a sealing surface. Then spray windex on both beads and add air to the outer chamber until the beads seat.
IMG_6116.jpeg

Finally, finish inflating the high pressure chamber (max is 50 psi and Coyote suggests 40 to allow for thermal expansion) and then outer (low pressure) chamber to your desired tire pressure. I went with 23 psi. Repeat until all tires mounted. Use soapy water at valve stems to check for leaks. Done.
IMG_6117.jpeg

I let them sit over night and re checked all the pressures. All were good so I rinsed them off and threw them on the Jeep (next post).
 
Last edited:
Finally on 35s! Here is my TJ sitting on the new Yokohama Geolandar MT G003 35x12.5r15 load C tires with Coyote beadlocks:

IMG_6121.jpeg


IMG_6120.jpeg

With the bodylift which allowed the 35s, the Atlas fits above the 1” drop UCF skid:
IMG_6123.jpeg

And belly height is upto 19”.
IMG_6124.jpeg

As always, weight is a concern. The 35” tires alone are 10# heavier each than the 33s I took off.
IMG_6099.jpeg
With the beadlocks (6#/wheel and the heavier tires, I’m at 90# per corner)
IMG_6098.jpeg

We will see how the axles like it.
 
Last edited:
But only 4#’s is due to the tire

Actually 10# per tire for the 33” to 35” change PLUS 6# each for the Coyote beadlock set up. So, in total, I’m up 16# per corner, total (beadlocks plus 33 tp 35).
Put another way, the 35” tire is 68#. The aluminum rim with beadlock is 22#. Still alot lighter than a traditional beadlock (probably by >10#).

Edit: This is probably about as light as you can get for beadlocked 35” tires at present. Even the no longer available kevlar Goodyear MTR was only 1# lighter (67#) according to one search I did. Anyone else know of a lighter 35” beadlock setup?
 
Last edited:
Actually 10# per tire for the 33” to 35” change PLUS 6# each for the Coyote beadlock set up. So, in total, I’m up 16# per corner, total (beadlocks plus 33 tp 35).
Put another way, the 35” tire is 68#. The aluminum rim with beadlock is 22#. Still alot lighter than a traditional beadlock (probably by >10#).

Edit: This is probably about as light as you can get for beadlocked 35” tires at present. Even the no longer available kevlar Goodyear MTR was only 1# lighter (67#) according to one search I did. Anyone else know of a lighter 35” beadlock setup?

Ok, I misread what you wrote above.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wildman and Woodrow
Really great write-ups. The Coyotes look like a lot of work, but the payoff in weight savings and capability seems worth it, especially if you like garage time. Everything looks great. Your rig just went leaps and bounds forward in capability with the Atlas and Beadlocks.
 
Besides the rocker protection, is body armor in the plan?

Yes. Because of weight, I’ve tried to go light on armor. Initially, I really didn’t have much besides mini skids on the front axle, nodular iron diff covers and the aluminum tank and belly skids. But I had A LOT more fun in the rocks than I anticipated and I was bummed not to do Pritchett Canyon in Moab last year because the Jeep was too small and unprotected. The steel Genright mini boatsides (80#) and a steel Warn steering box skid went on before the Rubicon last fall. Now the current plan is go from 1/4” to 3/8” aluminum belly skid and add an aluminum engine skid. Lastly, I’m planning aluminum corner armor; probably Genright (as you have, I think?). I’ll get another weight at some point, but I’m guessing loaded trail weight should still be under 4000 especially since I plan to leave the spare in the tow rig (for clearance as much as weight savings). I think that should be pretty safe with the Coyotes and a plug kit.
 
Idk if this is a bad idea or not but my experience with inner tubes would make me want to inflate,deflate and then inflate the inner tube again so it can be in a neutral position in regards to tension on the stem or folds/more tightly stretched areas?

Ignore if it would dislodge carefully positioned bits and bobs
 
  • Like
Reactions: Woodrow
Really great write-ups. The Coyotes look like a lot of work, but the payoff in weight savings and capability seems worth it, especially if you like garage time. Everything looks great. Your rig just went leaps and bounds forward in capability with the Atlas and Beadlocks.

Thanks Jeremy. The first tire took 2-2.5 hours, not including research beforehand. The subsequent tires were less than an hour each, working slowly. I got it all done in a long afternoon. Its not like doing an auto swap or something:)